Cursor Constructors

Definition

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class.

Overloads

Cursor(IntPtr)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified Windows handle.

Cursor(Stream)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified data stream.

Cursor(String)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified file.

Cursor(Type, String)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified resource with the specified resource type.

Cursor(IntPtr)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified Windows handle.

public:
 Cursor(IntPtr handle);
public Cursor (IntPtr handle);
new System.Windows.Forms.Cursor : nativeint -> System.Windows.Forms.Cursor
Public Sub New (handle As IntPtr)

Parameters

handle
IntPtr

An IntPtr that represents the Windows handle of the cursor to create.

Exceptions

handle is Zero.

Examples

The following code example creates a cursor from the Current cursor's Handle, changes its position and clipping rectangle. The result is the cursor will move up and to the left 50 pixels from where it is when the code is executed. Additionally, the cursor's clipping rectangle is changed to the bounds of the form (by default it is the user's whole screen). This example requires that you have a Form and a Button to call this code when it is clicked.

void MoveCursor()
{
   // Set the Current cursor, move the cursor's Position,
   // and set its clipping rectangle to the form.

   this->Cursor = gcnew System::Windows::Forms::Cursor( ::Cursor::Current->Handle );
   ::Cursor::Position = Point(::Cursor::Position.X - 50,::Cursor::Position.Y - 50);
   ::Cursor::Clip = Rectangle(this->Location,this->Size);

}
private void MoveCursor()
{
   // Set the Current cursor, move the cursor's Position,
   // and set its clipping rectangle to the form. 

   this.Cursor = new Cursor(Cursor.Current.Handle);
   Cursor.Position = new Point(Cursor.Position.X - 50, Cursor.Position.Y - 50);
   Cursor.Clip = new Rectangle(this.Location, this.Size);
}
Private Sub MoveCursor()
   ' Set the Current cursor, move the cursor's Position,
   ' and set its clipping rectangle to the form. 

   Me.Cursor = New Cursor(Cursor.Current.Handle)
   Cursor.Position = New Point(Cursor.Position.X - 50, Cursor.Position.Y - 50)
   Cursor.Clip = New Rectangle(Me.Location, Me.Size)
End Sub

Remarks

You must free the cursor handle when you are done with it. For more information about disposing of resources, see Cleaning Up Unmanaged Resources.

Applies to

Cursor(Stream)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified data stream.

public:
 Cursor(System::IO::Stream ^ stream);
public Cursor (System.IO.Stream stream);
new System.Windows.Forms.Cursor : System.IO.Stream -> System.Windows.Forms.Cursor
Public Sub New (stream As Stream)

Parameters

stream
Stream

The data stream to load the Cursor from.

Examples

The following code example loads a cursor from a Stream created by the OpenFile method of an OpenFileDialog. When the method is called, an OpenFileDialog is displayed to the user and when a. CUR file is selected and the dialog closed, the file is opened and the Stream returned is used to create a Cursor.

private:
   void SetCursor()
   {
      // Display an OpenFileDialog so the user can select a cursor.
      OpenFileDialog^ openFileDialog1 = gcnew OpenFileDialog;
      openFileDialog1->Filter = "Cursor Files|*.cur";
      openFileDialog1->Title = "Select a Cursor File";
      openFileDialog1->ShowDialog();

      // If a .cur file was selected, open it.
      if (  !openFileDialog1->FileName->Equals( "" ) )
      {
         // Assign the cursor in the stream to the form's Cursor property.
         this->Cursor = gcnew System::Windows::Forms::Cursor( openFileDialog1->OpenFile() );
      }
   }
private void SetCursor()
{
   // Display an OpenFileDialog so the user can select a cursor.
   OpenFileDialog openFileDialog1 = new OpenFileDialog();
   openFileDialog1.Filter = "Cursor Files|*.cur";
   openFileDialog1.Title = "Select a Cursor File";
   openFileDialog1.ShowDialog();

   // If a .cur file was selected, open it.
   if(openFileDialog1.FileName != "")
   {
      // Assign the cursor in the stream to the form's Cursor property.
      this.Cursor = new Cursor(openFileDialog1.OpenFile());
   }
}
Private Sub SetCursor()
   ' Display an OpenFileDialog so the user can select a Cursor.
   Dim openFileDialog1 As New OpenFileDialog()
   openFileDialog1.Filter = "Cursor Files|*.cur"
   openFileDialog1.Title = "Select a Cursor File"
   openFileDialog1.ShowDialog()
         
   ' If a .cur file was selected, open it.
   If openFileDialog1.FileName <> "" Then
      ' Assign the cursor in the stream to the form's Cursor property.
      Me.Cursor = New Cursor(openFileDialog1.OpenFile())
   End If
End Sub     

Remarks

The data stream specified by stream must contain a cursor (.cur) file.

Note

Animated cursors (.ani files) are not supported by the Cursor class.

See also

Applies to

Cursor(String)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified file.

public:
 Cursor(System::String ^ fileName);
public Cursor (string fileName);
new System.Windows.Forms.Cursor : string -> System.Windows.Forms.Cursor
Public Sub New (fileName As String)

Parameters

fileName
String

The cursor file to load.

Examples

The following code example displays customer information in a TreeView control. The root tree nodes display customer names, and the child tree nodes display the order numbers assigned to each customer. In this example, 1,000 customers are displayed with 15 orders each. The repainting of the TreeView is suppressed by using the BeginUpdate and EndUpdate methods, and a wait Cursor is displayed while the TreeView creates and paints the TreeNode objects. This example requires that you have a Customer object that can hold a collection of Order objects. It also requires that you have created an instance of a TreeView control on a Form.

// The basic Customer class.
ref class Customer: public System::Object
{
private:
   String^ custName;

protected:
   ArrayList^ custOrders;

public:
   Customer( String^ customername )
   {
      custName = "";
      custOrders = gcnew ArrayList;
      this->custName = customername;
   }


   property String^ CustomerName 
   {
      String^ get()
      {
         return this->custName;
      }

      void set( String^ value )
      {
         this->custName = value;
      }

   }

   property ArrayList^ CustomerOrders 
   {
      ArrayList^ get()
      {
         return this->custOrders;
      }

   }

};


// End Customer class
// The basic customer Order class.
ref class Order: public System::Object
{
private:
   String^ ordID;

public:
   Order( String^ orderid )
   {
      ordID = "";
      this->ordID = orderid;
   }


   property String^ OrderID 
   {
      String^ get()
      {
         return this->ordID;
      }

      void set( String^ value )
      {
         this->ordID = value;
      }

   }

};
// End Order class



void FillMyTreeView()
{
   // Add customers to the ArrayList of Customer objects.
   for ( int x = 0; x < 1000; x++ )
   {
      customerArray->Add( gcnew Customer( "Customer " + x ) );
   }
   
   // Add orders to each Customer object in the ArrayList.
   IEnumerator^ myEnum = customerArray->GetEnumerator();
   while ( myEnum->MoveNext() )
   {
      Customer^ customer1 = safe_cast<Customer^>(myEnum->Current);
      for ( int y = 0; y < 15; y++ )
      {
         customer1->CustomerOrders->Add( gcnew Order( "Order " + y ) );
      }
   }

   // Display a wait cursor while the TreeNodes are being created.
   ::Cursor::Current = gcnew System::Windows::Forms::Cursor( "MyWait.cur" );
   
   // Suppress repainting the TreeView until all the objects have been created.
   treeView1->BeginUpdate();
   
   // Clear the TreeView each time the method is called.
   treeView1->Nodes->Clear();
   
   // Add a root TreeNode for each Customer object in the ArrayList.
   myEnum = customerArray->GetEnumerator();
   while ( myEnum->MoveNext() )
   {
      Customer^ customer2 = safe_cast<Customer^>(myEnum->Current);
      treeView1->Nodes->Add( gcnew TreeNode( customer2->CustomerName ) );
      
      // Add a child treenode for each Order object in the current Customer object.
      IEnumerator^ myEnum = customer2->CustomerOrders->GetEnumerator();
      while ( myEnum->MoveNext() )
      {
         Order^ order1 = safe_cast<Order^>(myEnum->Current);
         treeView1->Nodes[ customerArray->IndexOf( customer2 ) ]->Nodes->Add( gcnew TreeNode( customer2->CustomerName + "." + order1->OrderID ) );
      }
   }
   
   // Reset the cursor to the default for all controls.
   ::Cursor::Current = Cursors::Default;
   
   // Begin repainting the TreeView.
   treeView1->EndUpdate();
}

// The basic Customer class.
public class Customer : System.Object
{
   private string custName = "";
   protected ArrayList custOrders = new ArrayList();

   public Customer(string customername)
   {
      this.custName = customername;
   }

   public string CustomerName
   {      
      get{return this.custName;}
      set{this.custName = value;}
   }

   public ArrayList CustomerOrders 
   {
      get{return this.custOrders;}
   }
} // End Customer class 

// The basic customer Order class.
public class Order : System.Object
{
   private string ordID = "";

   public Order(string orderid)
   {
      this.ordID = orderid;
   }

   public string OrderID
   {      
      get{return this.ordID;}
      set{this.ordID = value;}
   }
} // End Order class

// Create a new ArrayList to hold the Customer objects.
private ArrayList customerArray = new ArrayList(); 

private void FillMyTreeView()
{
   // Add customers to the ArrayList of Customer objects.
   for(int x=0; x<1000; x++)
   {
      customerArray.Add(new Customer("Customer" + x.ToString()));
   }

   // Add orders to each Customer object in the ArrayList.
   foreach(Customer customer1 in customerArray)
   {
      for(int y=0; y<15; y++)
      {
         customer1.CustomerOrders.Add(new Order("Order" + y.ToString()));    
      }
   }

   // Display a wait cursor while the TreeNodes are being created.
   Cursor.Current = new Cursor("MyWait.cur");
        
   // Suppress repainting the TreeView until all the objects have been created.
   treeView1.BeginUpdate();

   // Clear the TreeView each time the method is called.
   treeView1.Nodes.Clear();

   // Add a root TreeNode for each Customer object in the ArrayList.
   foreach(Customer customer2 in customerArray)
   {
      treeView1.Nodes.Add(new TreeNode(customer2.CustomerName));
          
      // Add a child treenode for each Order object in the current Customer object.
      foreach(Order order1 in customer2.CustomerOrders)
      {
         treeView1.Nodes[customerArray.IndexOf(customer2)].Nodes.Add(
           new TreeNode(customer2.CustomerName + "." + order1.OrderID));
      }
   }

   // Reset the cursor to the default for all controls.
   Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;

   // Begin repainting the TreeView.
   treeView1.EndUpdate();
}
Public Class Customer
   Inherits [Object]
   Private custName As String = ""
   Friend custOrders As New ArrayList()

   Public Sub New(ByVal customername As String)
      Me.custName = customername
   End Sub

   Public Property CustomerName() As String
      Get
         Return Me.custName
      End Get
      Set(ByVal Value As String)
         Me.custName = Value
      End Set
   End Property

   Public ReadOnly Property CustomerOrders() As ArrayList
      Get
         Return Me.custOrders
      End Get
   End Property
End Class


Public Class Order
   Inherits [Object]
   Private ordID As String

   Public Sub New(ByVal orderid As String)
      Me.ordID = orderid
   End Sub

   Public Property OrderID() As String
      Get
         Return Me.ordID
      End Get
      Set(ByVal Value As String)
         Me.ordID = Value
      End Set
   End Property
End Class

' Create a new ArrayList to hold the Customer objects.
Private customerArray As New ArrayList()

Private Sub FillMyTreeView()
   ' Add customers to the ArrayList of Customer objects.
   Dim x As Integer
   For x = 0 To 999
      customerArray.Add(New Customer("Customer" + x.ToString()))
   Next x

   ' Add orders to each Customer object in the ArrayList.
   Dim customer1 As Customer
   For Each customer1 In customerArray
      Dim y As Integer
      For y = 0 To 14
         customer1.CustomerOrders.Add(New Order("Order" + y.ToString()))
      Next y
   Next customer1

   ' Display a wait cursor while the TreeNodes are being created.
   Cursor.Current = New Cursor("MyWait.cur")

   ' Suppress repainting the TreeView until all the objects have been created.
   treeView1.BeginUpdate()

   ' Clear the TreeView each time the method is called.
   treeView1.Nodes.Clear()

   ' Add a root TreeNode for each Customer object in the ArrayList.
   Dim customer2 As Customer
   For Each customer2 In customerArray
      treeView1.Nodes.Add(New TreeNode(customer2.CustomerName))

      ' Add a child TreeNode for each Order object in the current Customer object.
      Dim order1 As Order
      For Each order1 In customer2.CustomerOrders
         treeView1.Nodes(customerArray.IndexOf(customer2)).Nodes.Add( _
    New TreeNode(customer2.CustomerName + "." + order1.OrderID))
      Next order1
   Next customer2

   ' Reset the cursor to the default for all controls.
   Cursor.Current = System.Windows.Forms.Cursors.Default

   ' Begin repainting the TreeView.
   treeView1.EndUpdate()
End Sub

Remarks

The fileName parameter must reference a standard cursor (.cur) file.

Note

Animated cursors (.ani files) are not supported by the Cursor class.

Applies to

Cursor(Type, String)

Initializes a new instance of the Cursor class from the specified resource with the specified resource type.

public:
 Cursor(Type ^ type, System::String ^ resource);
public Cursor (Type type, string resource);
new System.Windows.Forms.Cursor : Type * string -> System.Windows.Forms.Cursor
Public Sub New (type As Type, resource As String)

Parameters

type
Type

The resource Type.

resource
String

The name of the resource.

Examples

The following code example displays a form that demonstrates using a custom cursor by using the Cursor constructor. The custom Cursor is embedded in the application's resource file. The example requires that you have a cursor contained in a cursor file named MyCursor.cur. To compile this example using the command line, include the following flag: /res:MyCursor.Cur, CustomCursor.MyCursor.Cur

using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace CustomCursor
{
    public class Form1 : System.Windows.Forms.Form
    {
        [STAThread]
        static void Main() 
        {
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }

        public Form1()
        {
            this.ClientSize = new System.Drawing.Size(292, 266);
            this.Text = "Cursor Example";
            
            // The following generates a cursor from an embedded resource.
            
            // To add a custom cursor, create a bitmap
            //        1. Add a new cursor file to your project: 
            //                Project->Add New Item->General->Cursor File

            // --- To make the custom cursor an embedded resource  ---
            
            // In Visual Studio:
            //        1. Select the cursor file in the Solution Explorer
            //        2. Choose View->Properties.
            //        3. In the properties window switch "Build Action" to "Embedded Resources"

            // On the command line:
            //        Add the following flag:
            //            /res:CursorFileName.cur,Namespace.CursorFileName.cur
            //        
            //        Where "Namespace" is the namespace in which you want to use the cursor
            //        and   "CursorFileName.cur" is the cursor filename.

            // The following line uses the namespace from the passed-in type
            // and looks for CustomCursor.MyCursor.Cur in the assemblies manifest.
        // NOTE: The cursor name is acase sensitive.
            this.Cursor = new Cursor(GetType(), "MyCursor.cur");  
        }
    }
}
Imports System.Drawing
Imports System.Windows.Forms

Namespace CustomCursor
   
   Public Class Form1
      Inherits System.Windows.Forms.Form
      
      <System.STAThread()> _
      Public Shared Sub Main()
         System.Windows.Forms.Application.Run(New Form1())
      End Sub

      Public Sub New()

         Me.ClientSize = New System.Drawing.Size(292, 266)
         Me.Text = "Cursor Example"
         
        ' The following generates a cursor from an embedded resource.
         
        'To add a custom cursor, create a bitmap
        '       1. Add a new cursor file to your project: 
        '               Project->Add New Item->General->Cursor File

        '--- To make the custom cursor an embedded resource  ---

        'In Visual Studio:
        '       1. Select the cursor file in the Solution Explorer
        '       2. Choose View->Properties.
        '       3. In the properties window switch "Build Action" to "Embedded Resources"

        'On the command line:
        '       Add the following flag:
        '           /res:CursorFileName.cur,Namespace.CursorFileName.cur

        '       Where "Namespace" is the namespace in which you want to use the cursor
        '       and   "CursorFileName.cur" is the cursor filename.

        'The following line uses the namespace from the passed-in type
        'and looks for CustomCursor.MyCursor.cur in the assemblies manifest.
        'NOTE: The cursor name is acase sensitive.
        Me.Cursor = New Cursor(Me.GetType(), "MyCursor.cur")
      End Sub
   End Class
End Namespace 'CustomCursor

Remarks

The following is an example of how to embed a cursor as a resource within your application. To embed the resource, reference the resource name followed by a comma, then its full assembly path. See the Example section to learn how to load the cursor from the embedded resource.

Using the C# compiler:  
csc /resource:"MyWaitCursor.cur","MyCursors.MyWaitCursor.cur" MyCursor.cs  
Using the Visual Basic compiler:  
vbc /resource:"MyWaitCursor.cur","MyCursors.MyWaitCursor.cur" MyCursor.vb  

Note

The resource reference when compiling as well as when referencing it in code, is case sensitive for both the C# and Visual Basic compilers.

Applies to