Extending decimal point precision for selected data types

This topic describes how to extend decimal point precision for selected data types. You can create extensions of specific extended data types of the type Real, to change the decimal point precision for certain scenarios. To change the decimal point precision, change the NoOfDecimals property as needed.

Weight

Weight data can be maintained with a maximum of two decimals by default. If you require the ability to enter, maintain, and view weight data with a maximum precision of six decimals, you must extend the decimal point precision for the WeightBase extended data type.

Product quantity

Quantity data that is related to the procuring, consuming, producing, storing, and selling of products can be maintained with a maximum of two decimals by default. If you require the ability to enter, maintain, and view product quantities with a maximum precision of six decimals points, you must extend the decimal point precision of the ProductQuantity, CostQuantity, and CAMMagnitude extended data types.

Bill of materials, formulas, and production orders allow maintaining quantities with four decimals by default. If you require more than four decimals, extend the decimal point precision for the BOMProductQuantity extended data type.

Price unit, Price quantity, and Charge quantity data can be extended independently from product quantities. You can extend the PriceUnit extended data type to change the decimal point precision to a value other than the default two for price units.

You can extend the PriceQty extended data type to change the decimal point precision to a value other than the default two for price and charge quantities.

Overloaded data types

There are two extended data types that are used for storing both quantity data and other types of data. These data types must be extended separately.

The AmountQty extended data type is used for storing and presenting both amounts and quantities. The AmountQty extended data type should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimals for both amounts and quantities. For example, if amounts need to be maintained with three decimal points, but quantities still need to be maintained with two decimal points, then the data type should be extended to three decimal points.

The ProductQuantityHourValue extended data type is used for storing and presenting both hours and quantities. The ProductQuantityHourValue extended data type should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimal points for both hours and quantities. For example, if quantities need to be maintained with four decimal points, but hours still need to be maintained with two decimal points, then the data type should be extended to four decimal points.

Unit amounts

By default, unit amounts including prices, line discount amounts, and line charge amounts can be maintained with a maximum of two decimals.

If you require the ability enter, maintain, and view unit amounts with a maximum precision of six decimal points, you must extend the decimal point precision of the UnitAmountCur, UnitAmountMST, and CostPriceNonMonetary extended data types.

If you require a decimal point precision of more than four, you should also extend the PriceRoundOff extended data type.

Overloaded data types

There are five extended data types that are used for storing both unit amount data and other types of data.

The PriceDiscAmount extended data type is used for storing and presenting amounts and unit amounts. The PriceDiscAmount extended data type should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimals points for both amounts and unit amounts. For example, if amounts need to be maintained with three decimal points, but unit amounts need to be maintained with four decimal points, the data type should be extended to four decimal points.

The MCRRoyaltyValue, PdsRebateValue, TAMRebateValue, and MarkupValue extended data types are used for storing and presenting amounts, unit amounts, and percentages. The extended data types should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimal points for amounts, unit amounts, and percentages. For example, if amounts need to be maintained with three decimal points, but unit amounts need to be maintained with four decimal points and percentages should remain maintained with two decimal points, then the data type should be extended to four decimal points.

Amounts

Amounts, including unit amounts, can be maintained with a maximum of two decimals by default.

If you require the ability to enter, maintain, and view amounts including unit amounts with a precision of maximum six decimal points, you must extend the decimal point precision of the Amount, AmountMST, and CostAmountNonMonetary extended data types. If you require a different precision for unit amounts other than for amount, follow the description for how to extend the decimal point precision for unit amounts.

Overloaded data types

There are three extended data types that are used for storing amount data and other types of data. This means that they must be extended separately.

The AmountQty extended data type is used for storing and presenting amounts and quantities. The AmountQty extended data type should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimals for both amounts and quantities. For example, if amounts need to be maintained with three decimal points, but quantities still need to be maintained with two, then the data type should be extended to three decimal points.

The PriceDiscAmount extended data type is used for storing and presenting amounts and unit amounts. The PriceDiscAmount extended data type should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimals points for amounts and unit amounts. For example, if amounts need to be maintained with three decimal points, but unit amounts need to be maintained with four decimal points, then the data type should be extended to four decimal points.

The MarkupValue extended data type is used for storing and presenting amounts, unit amounts, and percentages. The extended data types should be extended to the maximum amount of required decimals points for amounts, unit amounts, and percentages. For example, if amounts need to be maintained with three decimal points, unit amounts need to be maintained with four decimal points, and percentages should remain with two decimal points, then the data type should be extended to four decimal points.