Connectors list

To find the triggers and actions defined by each connector's Swagger description plus any connector limits, see Connector details.

Connectors are an integral part when creating logic apps. Using these connectors, you can expand your on-premises and cloud applications to do various things with data that you create, and data you already have. The connectors are available as either built-in actions or managed connectors.

Built-in actions: The Logic Apps engine itself provides built-in actions for communicating to endpoints and performing tasks. For example, you can use these actions for calling HTTP endpoints, Azure Functions, and Azure API Management operations as well as manipulating messages with data operations and variables.

Managed connectors: Provide access to APIs for various services by creating API connections that the Logic Apps service hosts and manages. Managed connectors fall into these categories:

  • Standard connectors: Automatically available and included when you use logic apps. Some examples include Service Bus, Power BI, OneDrive, and many more.

  • On-premises connectors: Connect to server applications on-premises using the on-premises data gateway. On-premises connectors include connectivity to server applications such as SharePoint Server, SQL Server, Oracle DB, file shares, and others.

  • Integration account connectors: Available when you purchase an integration account. Using these connectors, you can transform and validate XML, process business-to-business messages with AS2 / X12 / EDIFACT, and encode and decode flat files. If you work with BizTalk Server, then these connectors are a good fit to expand your BizTalk workflows into Azure.

    BizTalk Server also has a Logic Apps adapter that includes receiving from a logic app, and sending to a logic app.

  • Enterprise connectors: Includes MQ and SAP. Available at an additional cost.

For more information about costs, see pricing details and the pricing model for Logic Apps.

There are thousands of applications and millions of executions that are successfully processing data and information using these connectors.

Built-in actions

The Logic Apps engine provides actions that can manipulate data, communicate over HTTP, and control the flow of the logic app definition. Some of these actions include:

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HTTP
Use logic apps to communicate with any endpoint over HTTP. API Icon
Azure Functions
Create functions that run custom snippets of C# or node.js, and then use these functions in your logic apps.
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Request
Provides a callable HTTPS URL typically used as a webhook in other applications. When the logic app receives a request to this URL, the logic app starts. API Icon
Schedule
Start logic apps based on simple or complex recurrence schedules. For example, create schedules from as simple as recur every day to recur hourly on the last Friday of every month between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm.
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Call
Logic App
Call a nested logic app. Any logic app with a request trigger can be called as a nested logic app. API Icon
API App
Call an App Service API App. API Apps with swagger renders just like other first class actions.

Standard connectors

The following table lists the most popular and some favorites with our users:

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Azure Blob
Storage
If you want to automate any tasks with your storage account, then you should look at this connector. Supports CRUD (create, read, update, delete) operations. API Icon
Dynamics 365
CRM Online
One of the most-asked for connectors. It has triggers and actions to help automate workflows with leads, and more.
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Event Hubs
Consume and publish events on an Event Hub. For example, you can get output from your logic app using Event Hubs, and then send the output to a real-time analytics provider. API Icon
FTP
If your FTP server is accessible from the internet, then you can automate workflows to work with files and folders.

SFTP is also available with the SFTP connector.
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Office 365
Outlook
Lots of triggers, and a lot more actions to use Office 365 email and events within your workflows.

This connector includes an approval email action to approve vacation requests, expense reports, and so on.

Office 365 users are also available with the Office 365 Users connector.
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Salesforce
Easily sign in with your Salesforce account to get access to objects, such as Leads, and more.
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Service Bus
The most popular connector within logic apps, it includes triggers and actions to do asynchronous messaging and publish/subscribe with queues, subscriptions, and topics. API Icon
SharePoint
Online
If you do anything with SharePoint, and could benefit from automation, we recommend looking at this connector. Can be used with an on-premises SharePoint, and SharePoint Online.
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SQL Server
One of the most used connectors, it can connect to an on-premises SQL Server, and an Azure SQL Database. API Icon
Twitter
Sign in easily with a Twitter account, and then start a workflow when a new tweet is posted. Then, save these tweets to a SQL database or SharePoint list.

On-premises connectors

On-premises connectors provide access to data in on-premises servers. Creating a connection to a server on-premises requires an on-premises data gateway that provides a secure communication channel without needed to configure network infrastructure. Some of the connectors include:

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DB2
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Oracle DB
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SharePoint
Server
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File
System
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SQL
Server
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BizTalk
Server

Integration account connectors

The Enterprise Integration Pack (EIP) includes connectors that are well known to the BizTalk Server community. When you purchase an integration account, you also get the following connectors:

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AS2
decoding
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AS2
encoding
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EDIFACT
decoding
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EDIFACT
encoding
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Flat file
encoding
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Flat file
decoding
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Integration
account
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Transform
XML
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X12
decoding
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X12
encoding
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XML
validation

Enterprise connectors

Connect to your enterprise applications within your logic apps.

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MQ
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SAP

Tip

To get started with Azure Logic Apps before signing up for an Azure account, go to Try Logic Apps. You can immediately create a short-lived starter logic app. No credit cards required; no commitments.

Connectors as triggers and actions

A trigger starts or runs an instance your logic app. Some connectors provide triggers that notify your app when specific events happen. For example, the FTP connector has the OnUpdatedFile trigger that starts your logic app when a file is updated.

Logic apps include the following types of triggers:

  • Poll triggers: These triggers poll your service at a specified frequency to check for new data.

    When new data is available, a new instance of your logic app runs with the data as input.

  • Push triggers: These triggers listen for data on an endpoint, or for an event to happen, then triggers a new instance of your logic app.

  • Recurrence trigger: This trigger instantiates an instance of your logic app on a prescribed schedule.

Connectors also provide actions that you can use in your workflow. For example, your logic app can look up data, and then use this data later on in your logic app. More specifically, you can look up customer data from a SQL database, and then use this customer data to build your workflow.

Tip

Connectors overview provides more details on triggers and actions.

Message manipulation actions

Logic apps include built-in actions that can change or manipulate your payload data. The built-in Data Operations connector includes the following actions:

Compose Build or generate values or objects to use later, or as you build your workflow. For example, you can author a JSON object with values from multiple steps, or calculate a constant to reference later in a logic app run.
Create CSV table
Create HTML table
Turn an array result-set into a CSV or HTML table. For example, add the CRM "List records" action, and add a filter for records added today. Then, send the results as an HTML table in an email.
Filter array (query) Filter a result set to the entries that interest you. For example, search all tweets with #Azure, and then "filter" the returned tweets to only return results that are Tweeted_by_followers > 50.
Join Join an array by some delimiter. For example, the Detect Key Phrases operation returns an array of key phrases. You could "join" them with a , or something similar. So instead of ["Some", "Phrase"], you have "Some, Phrase".
Parse JSON Parse out and access values from a JSON object in the designer. For example, if your Azure Function returns a JSON payload, then you can parse it to access the JSON properties later in another step. The action also validates that the JSON matches the specified schema at runtime.
Select Select certain properties of an array for further processing. If you "List records" from SQL, and it returns 15 columns, then select just a few of those columns for further processing. The output is an array that only contains the properties you select.

Custom connectors and Azure certification

To call into APIs that run custom code or aren't available as connectors, you can extend the Logic Apps platform by creating REST-based API Apps. You can also create your own custom connectors that can be made available to any logic app in your subscription.

If you want to make your custom API Apps public and available to use in Azure, then you can submit your connectors for Microsoft certification.

Get help

To ask questions, answer questions, and see what other Azure Logic Apps users are doing, go to the Azure Logic Apps forum.

To help improve Azure Logic Apps and connectors, vote on or submit ideas at the Logic Apps user feedback site.

Are we missing a connector topic, or any details you think are important? If yes, then help us by adding to our existing topics, or write your own. Our documentation is open source, and hosted on GitHub. Get started at our GitHub repository.

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