Create your first teams and channels in Microsoft Teams

Setting up and using your first set of teams and channels builds your experience with Teams and identifies champions who can help drive Teams adoption across your organization.

Suggestions for your first teams and channels

A team is a collection of people who gather together around a common goal. Channels are the collaboration spaces within a team where the actual work gets done.

To learn more, see Overview of teams and channels in Teams and Best practices for organizing teams in Teams.

We suggest you start with a “Get to know Teams” team where your early adopters can play around, ask questions, and discover the capabilities of Teams. This team can be essential to your success as you begin to experiment with Teams.

"Get to know Teams" team

Your project team can use the “Getting to know Teams” team to ensure they're set up with Teams clients, have some great initial conversations, and explore what Teams can do. You may already have a group of people in your organization who enjoy getting early access to new capabilities. This can be one of their initial teams when you bring them on board, and will help you to immediately start getting feedback.

Here's a suggested structure for the team.

Channel Description and usage Pinned tabs, bots, and apps
General All teams start with a General channel. Use this channel to make announcements as you start getting to know Teams.
Say hi Introduce yourself to the team and share what you want to get from Teams.
How do I A channel to ask how-to questions.
Step 1 – install the desktop and mobile clients.
Step 2 – jump into Teams.
Pinned tab that links to the Teams help center
Pinned tab that links to Teams training videos
Pinned tab that links to Teams desktop and mobile client download links
Feedback Share your thoughts on your Teams experiences. Pinned tab with Polly Poll
Ideas for future teams Share your thoughts on where Teams can drive additional value in your organization. What could these teams be called? Who would be members?
Support If something isn't working as expected, use this channel to get help.

Get your first teams up and running

As an admin, you can create and manage teams and channels in the Teams client or the Microsoft Teams & Skype for Business Admin Center. You can create teams as public or private. You can also create an org-wide team. Anyone using Teams in your organization can join a public team. For private teams, team owners manage team membership. And for an org-wide team, everyone in your organization is automatically added.

To get started, we recommend you create private teams and add another owner to manage team settings and membership.

Note

In the steps that follow, we use the Teams desktop client to create teams and channels. Keep in mind that as an admin, you can also do these tasks in the Microsoft Teams & Skype for Business Admin Center.

Create a team

On the left side of Teams, click Teams, and then at the bottom of the teams list, click Join or create a team. On the Create a team tile, click Create team.

From here, name your team, add a description, and set the privacy. After you've done that, invite people to join the team. You can add individual users, groups, and even entire contact groups (formerly known as "distribution lists").

Create a team

Add a team owner

Find the team that you created, click More options ˙˙˙ > Manage team. Then go to the Members tab. Find the user or users you want to designate as team owner, and then under Role, click Owner.

Create a channel in a team

Find the team that you created, click More options ˙˙˙ > Add channel. You can also click Manage team and add a channel in the Channels tab.

Add a channel to a team

Give the channel a descriptive name to make it easier for users to understand what the conversation in the channel is there to achieve.

As a team owner, you can automatically favorite channels for the whole team, making the channels more visible for everyone on the team. You can also pin tabs to the channel to add tools like OneNote or links to webpages and other content to make it easy for users to find what they need and share their thoughts.

Here's an example of the "How do I" channel in the "Get to know Teams" team, showing pinned tabs that link to Teams webpages – Teams video training, Teams help center, and Teams download links.

Pin tabs to a channel

Next steps

Go to Onboard your early adopters.