September 2000

Microsoft .NET Framework: Delivers the Platform for an Integrated, Service-Oriented Web

The Microsoft .NET Framework is a new platform for building integrated, service-oriented applications to meet the needs of today's Internet businesses; apps that gather information from, and interact with, a wide variety of sources, regardless of the platforms or languages in use. This article, the first of a two part series, illustrates how the .NET Framework enables you to quickly build and deploy Web services and applications in any programming language. Microsoft Intermediate Language and JIT compiler, which make this reuse possible, are described as well as managed components, assemblies, and the Common Type System (CTS). Jeffrey Richter

The Programmable Web: The Web Services Platform Provides Building Blocks for Seamless App Integration

Web Services are building blocks for constructing distributed Web-based applications in a platform, object model, and multilanguage manner. Web Services are based on open Internet standards, such as HTTP and XML, and form the basis of Microsoft's vision of the programmable Web. This article defines Web Services and the key enabling technologies that ensure services can be aggregated into applications. It then describes Microsoft's new Microsoft .NET Framework and its support for creating and consuming Web Services. Mary Kirtland

Visual Studio .NET: Build Web Applications Faster and Easier Using Web Services and XML

Visual Studio .NET includes exciting features, some of which are enhancements to previous versions and some of which are brand new. A few of the most significant additions are the new Microsoft programming language called C#; a new, smarter integrated development environment; new object-oriented features in Visual Basic .NET; and development lifecycle tools. This article provides an overview of these features, as well as a look at Web Services, Web Forms, and new versions of ADO and ASP. It takes a first look at dozens of important new Visual Studio features that aid in the design, development, testing, and deployment of solutions built with Visual Basic, C++, Visual FoxPro, and C#. Dave Mendlen

Sharp New Language: C# Offers the Power of C++ and Simplicity of Visual Basic

Many developers wish there was a language that was easy to write, read, and maintain like Visual Basic, but that still provided the power and flexibility of C++. For those developers, the new C# language is here. Microsoft has built C# with type-safety, garbage collection, simplified type declarations, versioning and scalability support, and lots of other features that make developing solutions faster and easier, especially for COM+ and Web Services. This article gives you a first look at C#, a language you are going to be hearing lots more about in the very near future. Joshua Trupin

Active Server Pages+: ASP+ Improves Web App Deployment, Scalability, Security, and Reliability

ASP has been rebuilt from the ground up. The result? Active Server Pages+. ASP+, with a host of new features, provides for easier to write, cleaner code that's simple to reuse and share. ASP+ boosts performance and scalability by offering access to complied languages; development is more intuitive thanks to Web Forms; and an object-oriented foundation facilitates reuse. Other important features include page events, Web Controls, and caching. Server Controls and improvements in data binding are also new with ASP+. Libraries for use with ASP+, and the Microsoft .NET Framework which allows custom business functions to be exposed over the Web, provide more new development opportunities. Dave Sussman

Marshalling Your Data: Efficient Data Transfer Techniques Using COM and Windows 2000

The way you choose to transfer data is vitally important in a distributed application. Windows 2000 provides several new features that allow you to transfer data more efficiently. Lightweight handlers allow you to write smart proxies that can cache results and perform buffered reads and writes, minimizing the number of network calls. Windows 2000 also allows you to use pipe interfaces to transfer large amounts of data efficiently through a read-ahead facility. This article illustrates several ways to improve data transfer in Windows 2000 using these new features. It also reports the results of transfer time tests and provides recommendations for transferred buffer sizes. Richard Grimes

Editor's Note: Nothin' but .NET

Flux: Hackers of the World Unite!

Paul DiLascia

New Stuff: Resources for Your Developer Toolbox

Theresa W. Carey

Web Q&A: Targeting Frames, Hidden Fields, Dropdown Menu Positioning, and Distilling Other Web Sites

Robert Hess

Cutting Edge: A Client-side Environment for ASP Pages

Dino Esposito

The XML Files: MSXML 3.0 Supports XPath 1.0, XSLT 1.0, XDR, and SAX2

Aaron Skonnard

Serving the Web: Using Visio 2000 Enterprise Edition to Model Applications

Ken Spencer

Basic Instincts: Automating COM+ Administration

Ted Pattison

Under the Hood: A Tale of Real-world Debugging

Matt Pietrek

C++ Q&A: CPopupText for Home-grown Tooltips, Controlling Application Instantiation

Paul DiLascia

MSDN Update: News this Month from MSDN

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