April 2001

C++ Attributes: Make COM Programming a Breeze with New Feature in Visual Studio .NET

C++ attributes in Visual Studio .NET are used to generate C++ code through attribute providers. Attribute providers generate code for COM classes, and the code is injected by the C++ compiler at compile time. This has the effect of reducing the amount of code that you need to write. In addition, with C++ attributes you no longer need to maintain separate IDL and RGS files, which makes project management simpler. This article explains C++ attributes, the process used by the attribute provider to generate code, and the code that is automatically generated. It also covers how attributes affect the registration process, how attributes can be used to generate code module entry points, and how connection points can be implemented using C++ attributes. Also explained is how these features contribute to the Unified Event Model for the .NET platform. Richard Grimes

Winsock 2: QoS API Fine-Tunes Networked App Throughput and Reliability

The Generic Quality of Service (GQoS) API is a subset of the Winsock 2 API that allows a Winsock application to inform the network of its traffic requirements, enabling entitled applications to receive preferential treatment for their traffic. Existing Winsock applications can be GQoS-enabled by adding or modifying Winsock calls at appropriate places. An application's sending and receiving traffic needs can also be defined by specifying parameters within the QualityOfService (QOS) structure. This article discusses how traffic information is conveyed throughout the network, what kind of QOS structure should be used in your app, and how to set up network configurations for testing GQoS applications. Wei Hua

C++ and STL: Take Advantage of STL Algorithms by Implementing a Custom Iterator

There are many benefits to using the Standard Template Library (STL) for C++ development, including the ability to use generic data structures and algorithms. To use the STL algorithms, an STL-conforming container is required. Iterating through the Internet Explorer cache is an informative exercise, but the cache is not an STL-conforming container. So, to use the STL algorithms to search and enumerate the Internet Explorer cache, an adapter is needed. Building such an adapter-an STL-conforming iterator-is the topic of this article. Also provided is an overview of the components of the STL and the Win32 Internet APIs used. Samir Bajaj

SOAP Toolkit 2.0: New Definition Languages Expose Your COM Objects to SOAP Clients

In SOAP Toolkit 2.0, the Services Description Language (SDL) has been replaced with the Web Services Description Language (WSDL) and the Web Services Meta Language (WSML). WSDL and WSML files describe the interfaces to a service and expose COM objects to SOAP clients. This article describes a custom tool, IDL2SDL, which takes an IDL file and produces WSDL and WSML files without waiting for a DLL or TLB file to be generated. Also shown is a customized development environment in which WSDL and WSML files automatically reflect the changes to IDL files. Carlos C. Tapang

Windows Script Host: New Code-Signing Features Protect Against Malicious Scripts

Downloading scripts from the Web or e-mail leaves users vulnerable to security risks because scripts can't be signed. But now developers can use Windows Script Host (WSH) to hash scripts so users can verify their source and safety. With WSH, scripts can be signed or verified using all the same tools ordinarily used to sign EXE, CAB, DLL, and OCX files. This article discusses public-key cryptosystems, the process of signing and verifying scripts in WSH, and several warnings about attacks that could potentially be made against cryptographically secured scripts and ways in which to avoid them. Eric Lippert

Secure Sockets Layer: Protect Your E-Commerce Web Site with SSL and Digital Certificates

Security is one of the most important factors in the future growth of e-businesses. Making sure that communications remain secure between customers and the Web server is a critical issue. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is the standard that secure Web sites are built upon today. This article presents an overview of SSL-based Web security, explaining such fundamental concepts as digital certificates and their distribution, encryption, and the proper configuration of Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS). Acquiring a certificate, installing it, and configuring IIS for SSL are outlined in a step-by-step process. John Papa

Editor's Note: The New Web Q&A

New Stuff: Resources for Your Developer Toolbox

Theresa W. Carey

Web Q&A: Image Map Tooltips, Mouseover Effects, Script Execution Order, XML Schemas, and More

Edited by Nancy Michell

Serving the Web: Windows Forms in Visual Basic .NET

Ken Spencer

Cutting Edge: Server-side ASP.NET Data Binding, Part 2: Customizing the DataGrid Control

Dino Esposito

.NET Column: An Introduction to Delegates

Jeffrey Richter

Security Briefs: The Security Support Provider Interface Revisited

Keith Brown

Wicked Code: CityView App: Build Web Service Clients Quickly and Easily with C#

Jeff Prosise

C++ Q&A: Why = Returns a Reference, Accessing the Recycle Bin, When to Use STL

Paul DiLascia

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