Secure access and data in Azure Logic Apps

Azure Logic Apps relies on Azure Storage to store and automatically encrypt data at rest. This encryption protects your data and helps you meet your organizational security and compliance commitments. By default, Azure Storage uses Microsoft-managed keys to encrypt your data. For more information, see Azure Storage encryption for data at rest.

To further control access and protect sensitive data in Azure Logic Apps, you can set up more security in these areas:

For more information about security in Azure, see these topics:

Access for inbound calls to request-based triggers

Inbound calls that a logic app receives through a request-based trigger, such as the Request trigger or HTTP Webhook trigger, support encryption and are secured with Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.2 at minimum, previously known as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Logic Apps enforces this version when receiving an inbound call to the Request trigger or a callback to the HTTP Webhook trigger or action. If you get TLS handshake errors, make sure that you use TLS 1.2. For more information, see Solving the TLS 1.0 problem.

For inbound calls, use the following cipher suites:

  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256

Note

For backward compatibility, Azure Logic Apps currently supports some older cipher suites. However, don't use older cipher suites when you develop new apps because such suites might not be supported in the future.

For example, you might find the following cipher suites if you inspect the TLS handshake messages while using the Azure Logic Apps service or by using a security tool on your logic app's URL. Again, don't use these older suites:

  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA

The following list includes more ways that you can limit access to triggers that receive inbound calls to your logic app so that only authorized clients can call your logic app:

Generate shared access signatures (SAS)

Every request endpoint on a logic app has a Shared Access Signature (SAS) in the endpoint's URL, which follows this format:

https://<request-endpoint-URI>sp=<permissions>sv=<SAS-version>sig=<signature>

Each URL contains the sp, sv, and sig query parameter as described in this table:

Query parameter Description
sp Specifies permissions for the allowed HTTP methods to use.
sv Specifies the SAS version to use for generating the signature.
sig Specifies the signature to use for authenticating access to the trigger. This signature is generated by using the SHA256 algorithm with a secret access key on all the URL paths and properties. Never exposed or published, this key is kept encrypted and stored with the logic app. Your logic app authorizes only those triggers that contain a valid signature created with the secret key.

Inbound calls to a request endpoint can use only one authorization scheme, either SAS or Azure Active Directory Open Authentication. Although using one scheme doesn't disable the other scheme, using both schemes at the same time causes an error because the service doesn't know which scheme to choose.

For more information about securing access with SAS, see these sections in this topic:

Regenerate access keys

To generate a new security access key at any time, use the Azure REST API or Azure portal. All previously generated URLs that use the old key are invalidated and no longer have authorization to trigger the logic app. The URLs that you retrieve after regeneration are signed with the new access key.

  1. In the Azure portal, open the logic app that has the key you want to regenerate.

  2. On the logic app's menu, under Settings, select Access Keys.

  3. Select the key that you want to regenerate and finish the process.

Create expiring callback URLs

If you share the endpoint URL for a request-based trigger with other parties, you can generate callback URLs that use specific keys and have expiration dates. That way, you can seamlessly roll keys or restrict access to triggering your logic app based on a specific timespan. To specify an expiration date for a URL, use the Logic Apps REST API, for example:

POST /subscriptions/<Azure-subscription-ID>/resourceGroups/<Azure-resource-group-name>/providers/Microsoft.Logic/workflows/<workflow-name>/triggers/<trigger-name>/listCallbackUrl?api-version=2016-06-01

In the body, include the NotAfterproperty by using a JSON date string. This property returns a callback URL that's valid only until the NotAfter date and time.

Create URLs with primary or secondary secret key

When you generate or list callback URLs for a request-based trigger, you can specify the key to use for signing the URL. To generate a URL that's signed by a specific key, use the Logic Apps REST API, for example:

POST /subscriptions/<Azure-subscription-ID>/resourceGroups/<Azure-resource-group-name>/providers/Microsoft.Logic/workflows/<workflow-name>/triggers/<trigger-name>/listCallbackUrl?api-version=2016-06-01

In the body, include the KeyType property as either Primary or Secondary. This property returns a URL that's signed by the specified security key.

Enable Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth)

For inbound calls to an endpoint that's created by a request-based trigger, you can enable Azure AD OAuth by defining or adding an authorization policy for your logic app. This way, inbound calls use OAuth access tokens for authorization.

When your logic app receives an inbound request that includes an OAuth access token, Azure Logic Apps compares the token's claims against the claims specified by each authorization policy. If a match exists between the token's claims and all the claims in at least one policy, authorization succeeds for the inbound request. The token can have more claims than the number specified by the authorization policy.

Note

For the Logic App (Standard) resource type in single-tenant Azure Logic Apps, Azure AD OAuth is currently unavailable for inbound calls to request-based triggers, such as the Request trigger and HTTP Webhook trigger.

Considerations before you enable Azure AD OAuth

  • An inbound call to the request endpoint can use only one authorization scheme, either Azure AD OAuth or Shared Access Signature (SAS). Although using one scheme doesn't disable the other scheme, using both schemes at the same time causes an error because the Logic Apps service doesn't know which scheme to choose.

  • Only Bearer-type authorization schemes are supported for Azure AD OAuth access tokens, which means that the Authorization header for the access token must specify the Bearer type.

  • Your logic app is limited to a maximum number of authorization policies. Each authorization policy also has a maximum number of claims. For more information, see Limits and configuration for Azure Logic Apps.

  • An authorization policy must include at least the Issuer claim, which has a value that starts with either https://sts.windows.net/ or https://login.microsoftonline.com/ (OAuth V2) as the Azure AD issuer ID.

    For example, suppose that your logic app has an authorization policy that requires two claim types, Audience and Issuer. This sample payload section for a decoded access token includes both claim types where aud is the Audience value and iss is the Issuer value:

    {
        "aud": "https://management.core.windows.net/",
        "iss": "https://sts.windows.net/<Azure-AD-issuer-ID>/",
        "iat": 1582056988,
        "nbf": 1582056988,
        "exp": 1582060888,
        "_claim_names": {
           "groups": "src1"
        },
        "_claim_sources": {
           "src1": {
              "endpoint": "https://graph.windows.net/7200000-86f1-41af-91ab-2d7cd011db47/users/00000-f433-403e-b3aa-7d8406464625d7/getMemberObjects"
           }
        },
        "acr": "1",
        "aio": "AVQAq/8OAAAA7k1O1C2fRfeG604U9e6EzYcy52wb65Cx2OkaHIqDOkuyyr0IBa/YuaImaydaf/twVaeW/etbzzlKFNI4Q=",
        "amr": [
           "rsa",
           "mfa"
        ],
        "appid": "c44b4083-3bb0-00001-b47d-97400853cbdf3c",
        "appidacr": "2",
        "deviceid": "bfk817a1-3d981-4dddf82-8ade-2bddd2f5f8172ab",
        "family_name": "Sophia Owen",
        "given_name": "Sophia Owen (Fabrikam)",
        "ipaddr": "167.220.2.46",
        "name": "sophiaowen",
        "oid": "3d5053d9-f433-00000e-b3aa-7d84041625d7",
        "onprem_sid": "S-1-5-21-2497521184-1604012920-1887927527-21913475",
        "puid": "1003000000098FE48CE",
        "scp": "user_impersonation",
        "sub": "KGlhIodTx3XCVIWjJarRfJbsLX9JcdYYWDPkufGVij7_7k",
        "tid": "72f988bf-86f1-41af-91ab-2d7cd011db47",
        "unique_name": "SophiaOwen@fabrikam.com",
        "upn": "SophiaOwen@fabrikam.com",
        "uti": "TPJ7nNNMMZkOSx6_uVczUAA",
        "ver": "1.0"
    }
    

Enable Azure AD OAuth for your logic app

Follow these steps for either the Azure portal or your Azure Resource Manager template:

In the Azure portal, add one or more authorization policies to your logic app:

  1. In the Azure portal, find and open your logic app in the Logic App Designer.

  2. On the logic app menu, under Settings, select Authorization. After the Authorization pane opens, select Add policy.

    Select "Authorization" > "Add policy"

  3. Provide information about the authorization policy by specifying the claim types and values that your logic app expects in the access token presented by each inbound call to the Request trigger:

    Provide information for authorization policy

    Property Required Description
    Policy name Yes The name that you want to use for the authorization policy
    Claims Yes The claim types and values that your logic app accepts from inbound calls. The claim value is limited to a maximum number of characters. Here are the available claim types:

    - Issuer
    - Audience
    - Subject
    - JWT ID (JSON Web Token identifier)

    At a minimum, the Claims list must include the Issuer claim, which has a value that starts with https://sts.windows.net/ or https://login.microsoftonline.com/ as the Azure AD issuer ID. For more information about these claim types, see Claims in Azure AD security tokens. You can also specify your own claim type and value.

  4. To add another claim, select from these options:

    • To add another claim type, select Add standard claim, select the claim type, and specify the claim value.

    • To add your own claim, select Add custom claim. For more information, see how to provide optional claims to your app. Your custom claim is then stored as a part of your JWT ID; for example, "tid": "72f988bf-86f1-41af-91ab-2d7cd011db47".

  5. To add another authorization policy, select Add policy. Repeat the previous steps to set up the policy.

  6. When you're done, select Save.

  7. To include the Authorization header from the access token in the request-based trigger outputs, see Include 'Authorization' header in request trigger outputs.

Workflow properties such as policies don't appear in your logic app's code view in the Azure portal. To access your policies programmatically, call the following API through Azure Resource Manager: https://management.azure.com/subscriptions/{Azure-subscription-ID}/resourceGroups/{Azure-resource-group-name}/providers/Microsoft.Logic/workflows/{your-workflow-name}?api-version=2016-10-01&_=1612212851820. Make sure that you replace the placeholder values for your Azure subscription ID, resource group name, and workflow name.

Include 'Authorization' header in request trigger outputs

For logic apps that enable Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth) for authorizing inbound calls to access request-based triggers, you can enable the Request trigger or HTTP Webhook trigger outputs to include the Authorization header from the OAuth access token. In the trigger's underlying JSON definition, add and set the operationOptions property to IncludeAuthorizationHeadersInOutputs. Here's an example for the Request trigger:

"triggers": {
   "manual": {
      "inputs": {
         "schema": {}
      },
      "kind": "Http",
      "type": "Request",
      "operationOptions": "IncludeAuthorizationHeadersInOutputs"
   }
}

For more information, see these topics:

Expose your logic app with Azure API Management

For more authentication protocols and options, consider exposing your logic app as an API by using Azure API Management. This service provides rich monitoring, security, policy, and documentation capabilities for any endpoint. API Management can expose a public or private endpoint for your logic app. To authorize access to this endpoint, you can use Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth), client certificate, or other security standards. When API Management receives a request, the service sends the request to your logic app and makes any necessary transformations or restrictions along the way. To let only API Management call your logic app, you can restrict your logic app's inbound IP addresses.

For more information, review the following documentation:

Restrict inbound IP addresses

Along with Shared Access Signature (SAS), you might want to specifically limit the clients that can call your logic app. For example, if you manage your request endpoint by using Azure API Management, you can restrict your logic app to accept requests only from the IP address for the API Management service instance that you create.

Regardless of any IP addresses that you specify, you can still run a logic app that has a request-based trigger by using the Logic Apps REST API: Workflow Triggers - Run request or by using API Management. However, this scenario still requires authentication against the Azure REST API. All events appear in the Azure Audit Log. Make sure that you set access control policies accordingly.

To restrict the inbound IP addresses for your logic app, follow these steps for either the Azure portal or your Azure Resource Manager template:

In the Azure portal, this filter affects both triggers and actions, contrary to the description in the portal under Allowed inbound IP addresses. To set up this filter separately for triggers and for actions, use the accessControl object in an Azure Resource Manager template for your logic app or the Logic Apps REST API: Workflow - Create Or Update operation.

  1. In the Azure portal, open your logic app in the Logic App Designer.

  2. On your logic app's menu, under Settings, select Workflow settings.

  3. In the Access control configuration section, under Allowed inbound IP addresses, choose the path for your scenario:

    • To make your logic app callable only as a nested logic app by using the built-in Azure Logic Apps action, select Only other Logic Apps, which works only when you use the Azure Logic Apps action to call the nested logic app.

      This option writes an empty array to your logic app resource and requires that only calls from parent logic apps that use the built-in Azure Logic Apps action can trigger the nested logic app.

    • To make your logic app callable only as a nested app by using the HTTP action, select Specific IP ranges, not Only other Logic Apps. When the IP ranges for triggers box appears, enter the parent logic app's outbound IP addresses. A valid IP range uses these formats: x.x.x.x/x or x.x.x.x-x.x.x.x.

      Note

      If you use the Only other Logic Apps option and the HTTP action to call your nested logic app, the call is blocked, and you get a "401 Unauthorized" error.

    • For scenarios where you want to restrict inbound calls from other IPs, when the IP ranges for triggers box appears, specify the IP address ranges that the trigger accepts. A valid IP range uses these formats: x.x.x.x/x or x.x.x.x-x.x.x.x.

  4. Optionally, under Restrict calls to get input and output messages from run history to the provided IP addresses, you can specify the IP address ranges for inbound calls that can access input and output messages in run history.

Access to logic app operations

You can permit only specific users or groups to run specific tasks, such as managing, editing, and viewing logic apps. To control their permissions, use Azure role-based access control (Azure RBAC). You can assign built-in or customized roles to members who have access to your Azure subscription. Azure Logic Apps has these specific roles:

  • Logic App Contributor: Lets you manage logic apps, but you can't change access to them.

  • Logic App Operator: Lets you read, enable, and disable logic apps, but you can't edit or update them.

  • Contributor: Grants full access to manage all resources, but does not allow you to assign roles in Azure RBAC, manage assignments in Azure Blueprints, or share image galleries.

    For example, suppose you have to work with a logic app that you didn't create and authenticate connections used by that logic app's workflow. Your Azure subscription requires Contributor permissions for the resource group that contains that logic app resource. If you create a logic app resource, you automatically have Contributor access.

To prevent others from changing or deleting your logic app, you can use Azure Resource Lock. This capability prevents others from changing or deleting production resources. For more information about connection security, review Connection configuration in Azure Logic Apps and Connection security and encryption.

Access to run history data

During a logic app run, all the data is encrypted during transit by using Transport Layer Security (TLS) and at rest. When your logic app finishes running, you can view the history for that run, including the steps that ran along with the status, duration, inputs, and outputs for each action. This rich detail provides insight into how your logic app ran and where you might start troubleshooting any problems that arise.

When you view your logic app's run history, Logic Apps authenticates your access and then provides links to the inputs and outputs for the requests and responses for each run. However, for actions that handle any passwords, secrets, keys, or other sensitive information, you want to prevent others from viewing and accessing that data. For example, if your logic app gets a secret from Azure Key Vault to use when authenticating an HTTP action, you want to hide that secret from view.

To control access to the inputs and outputs in your logic app's run history, you have these options:

Restrict access by IP address range

You can limit access to the inputs and outputs in your logic app's run history so that only requests from specific IP address ranges can view that data.

For example, to block anyone from accessing inputs and outputs, specify an IP address range such as 0.0.0.0-0.0.0.0. Only a person with administrator permissions can remove this restriction, which provides the possibility for "just-in-time" access to your logic app's data.

To specify the allowed IP ranges, follow these steps for either the Azure portal or your Azure Resource Manager template:

  1. In the Azure portal, open your logic app in the Logic App Designer.

  2. On your logic app's menu, under Settings, select Workflow settings.

  3. Under Access control configuration > Allowed inbound IP addresses, select Specific IP ranges.

  4. Under IP ranges for contents, specify the IP address ranges that can access content from inputs and outputs.

    A valid IP range uses these formats: x.x.x.x/x or x.x.x.x-x.x.x.x

Secure data in run history by using obfuscation

Many triggers and actions have settings to secure inputs, outputs, or both from a logic app's run history. All managed connectors and custom connectors support these options. However, the following built-in operations don't support these options:

Secure Inputs - Unsupported Secure Outputs - Unsupported
Append to array variable
Append to string variable
Decrement variable
For each
If
Increment variable
Initialize variable
Recurrence
Scope
Set variable
Switch
Terminate
Until
Append to array variable
Append to string variable
Compose
Decrement variable
For each
If
Increment variable
Initialize variable
Parse JSON
Recurrence
Response
Scope
Set variable
Switch
Terminate
Until
Wait

Considerations for securing inputs and outputs

Before using these settings to help you secure this data, review these considerations:

  • When you obscure the inputs or outputs on a trigger or action, Logic Apps doesn't send the secured data to Azure Log Analytics. Also, you can't add tracked properties to that trigger or action for monitoring.

  • The Logic Apps API for handling workflow history doesn't return secured outputs.

  • To secure outputs from an action that obscures inputs or explicitly obscures outputs, manually turn on Secure Outputs in that action.

  • Make sure that you turn on Secure Inputs or Secure Outputs in downstream actions where you expect the run history to obscure that data.

    Secure Outputs setting

    When you manually turn on Secure Outputs in a trigger or action, Logic Apps hides these outputs in the run history. If a downstream action explicitly uses these secured outputs as inputs, Logic Apps hides this action's inputs in the run history, but doesn't enable the action's Secure Inputs setting.

    Secured outputs as inputs and downstream impact on most actions

    The Compose, Parse JSON, and Response actions has only the Secure Inputs setting. When turned on, the setting also hides these actions' outputs. If these actions explicitly use the upstream secured outputs as inputs, Logic Apps hides these actions' inputs and outputs, but doesn't enable these actions' Secure Inputs setting. If a downstream action explicitly uses the hidden outputs from the Compose, Parse JSON, or Response actions as inputs, Logic Apps doesn't hide this downstream action's inputs or outputs.

    Secured outputs as inputs with downstream impact on specific actions

    Secure Inputs setting

    When you manually turn on Secure Inputs in a trigger or action, Logic Apps hides these inputs in the run history. If a downstream action explicitly uses the visible outputs from that trigger or action as inputs, Logic Apps hides this downstream action's inputs in the run history, but doesn't enable Secure Inputs in this action and doesn't hide this action's outputs.

    Secured inputs and downstream impact on most actions

    If the Compose, Parse JSON, and Response actions explicitly use the visible outputs from the trigger or action that has the secured inputs, Logic Apps hides these actions' inputs and outputs, but doesn't enable these action's Secure Inputs setting. If a downstream action explicitly uses the hidden outputs from the Compose, Parse JSON, or Response actions as inputs, Logic Apps doesn't hide this downstream action's inputs or outputs.

    Secured inputs and downstream impact on specific actions

Secure inputs and outputs in the designer

  1. In the Azure portal, open your logic app in the Logic App Designer.

    Open logic app in Logic App Designer

  2. On the trigger or action where you want to secure sensitive data, select the ellipses (...) button, and then select Settings.

    Open trigger or action settings

  3. Turn on either Secure Inputs, Secure Outputs, or both. When you're finished, select Done.

    Turn on "Secure Inputs" or "Secure Outputs"

    The action or trigger now shows a lock icon in the title bar.

    Action or trigger title bar shows lock icon

    Tokens that represent secured outputs from previous actions also show lock icons. For example, when you select such an output from the dynamic content list to use in an action, that token shows a lock icon.

    Select token for secured output

  4. After the logic app runs, you can view the history for that run.

    1. On the logic app's Overview pane, select the run that you want to view.

    2. On the Logic app run pane, expand the actions that you want to review.

      If you chose to obscure both inputs and outputs, those values now appear hidden.

      Hidden inputs and outputs in run history

Secure inputs and outputs in code view

In the underlying trigger or action definition, add or update the runtimeConfiguration.secureData.properties array with either or both of these values:

  • "inputs": Secures inputs in run history.
  • "outputs": Secures outputs in run history.
"<trigger-or-action-name>": {
   "type": "<trigger-or-action-type>",
   "inputs": {
      <trigger-or-action-inputs>
   },
   "runtimeConfiguration": {
      "secureData": {
         "properties": [
            "inputs",
            "outputs"
         ]
      }
   },
   <other-attributes>
}

Access to parameter inputs

If you deploy across different environments, consider parameterizing the values in your workflow definition that vary based on those environments. That way, you can avoid hard-coded data by using an Azure Resource Manager template to deploy your logic app, protect sensitive data by defining secured parameters, and pass that data as separate inputs through the template's parameters by using a parameter file.

For example, if you authenticate HTTP actions with Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth), you can define and obscure the parameters that accept the client ID and client secret that are used for authentication. To define these parameters in your logic app, use the parameters section in your logic app's workflow definition and Resource Manager template for deployment. To help secure parameter values that you don't want shown when editing your logic app or viewing run history, define the parameters by using the securestring or secureobject type and use encoding as necessary. Parameters that have this type aren't returned with the resource definition and aren't accessible when viewing the resource after deployment. To access these parameter values during runtime, use the @parameters('<parameter-name>') expression inside your workflow definition. This expression is evaluated only at runtime and is described by the Workflow Definition Language.

Note

If you use a parameter in a request header or body, that parameter might be visible when you view your logic app's run history and outgoing HTTP request. Make sure that you also set your content access policies accordingly. You can also use obfuscation to hide inputs and outputs in your run history. Authorization headers are never visible through inputs or outputs. So if a secret is used there, that secret isn't retrievable.

For more information, see these sections in this topic:

If you automate deployment for logic apps by using Resource Manager templates, you can define secured template parameters, which are evaluated at deployment, by using the securestring and secureobject types. To define template parameters, use your template's top level parameters section, which is separate and different from your workflow definition's parameters section. To provide the values for template parameters, use a separate parameter file.

For example, if you use secrets, you can define and use secured template parameters that retrieve those secrets from Azure Key Vault at deployment. You can then reference the key vault and secret in your parameter file. For more information, see these topics:

Secure parameters in workflow definitions

To protect sensitive information in your logic app's workflow definition, use secured parameters so this information isn't visible after you save your logic app. For example, suppose you have an HTTP action requires basic authentication, which uses a username and password. In the workflow definition, the parameters section defines the basicAuthPasswordParam and basicAuthUsernameParam parameters by using the securestring type. The action definition then references these parameters in the authentication section.

"definition": {
   "$schema": "https://schema.management.azure.com/providers/Microsoft.Logic/schemas/2016-06-01/workflowdefinition.json#",
   "actions": {
      "HTTP": {
         "type": "Http",
         "inputs": {
            "method": "GET",
            "uri": "https://www.microsoft.com",
            "authentication": {
               "type": "Basic",
               "username": "@parameters('basicAuthUsernameParam')",
               "password": "@parameters('basicAuthPasswordParam')"
            }
         },
         "runAfter": {}
      }
   },
   "parameters": {
      "basicAuthPasswordParam": {
         "type": "securestring"
      },
      "basicAuthUsernameParam": {
         "type": "securestring"
      }
   },
   "triggers": {
      "manual": {
         "type": "Request",
         "kind": "Http",
         "inputs": {
            "schema": {}
         }
      }
   },
   "contentVersion": "1.0.0.0",
   "outputs": {}
}

Secure parameters in Azure Resource Manager templates

A Resource Manager template for a logic app has multiple parameters sections. To protect passwords, keys, secrets, and other sensitive information, define secured parameters at the template level and workflow definition level by using the securestring or secureobject type. You can then store these values in Azure Key Vault and use the parameter file to reference the key vault and secret. Your template then retrieves that information at deployment. For more information, see Pass sensitive values at deployment by using Azure Key Vault.

Here is more information about these parameters sections:

  • At the template's top level, a parameters section defines the parameters for the values that the template uses at deployment. For example, these values can include connection strings for a specific deployment environment. You can then store these values in a separate parameter file, which makes changing these values easier.

  • Inside your logic app's resource definition, but outside your workflow definition, a parameters section specifies the values for your workflow definition's parameters. In this section, you can assign these values by using template expressions that reference your template's parameters. These expressions are evaluated at deployment.

  • Inside your workflow definition, a parameters section defines the parameters that your logic app uses at runtime. You can then reference these parameters inside your logic app's workflow by using workflow definition expressions, which are evaluated at runtime.

This example template that has multiple secured parameter definitions that use the securestring type:

Parameter name Description
TemplatePasswordParam A template parameter that accepts a password that is then passed to the workflow definition's basicAuthPasswordParam parameter
TemplateUsernameParam A template parameter that accepts a username that is then passed to the workflow definition's basicAuthUserNameParam parameter
basicAuthPasswordParam A workflow definition parameter that accepts the password for basic authentication in an HTTP action
basicAuthUserNameParam A workflow definition parameter that accepts the username for basic authentication in an HTTP action
{
   "$schema": "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
   "contentVersion": "1.0.0.0",
   "parameters": {
      "LogicAppName": {
         "type": "string",
         "minLength": 1,
         "maxLength": 80,
         "metadata": {
            "description": "Name of the Logic App."
         }
      },
      "TemplatePasswordParam": {
         "type": "securestring"
      },
      "TemplateUsernameParam": {
         "type": "securestring"
      },
      "LogicAppLocation": {
         "type": "string",
         "defaultValue": "[resourceGroup().location]",
         "allowedValues": [
            "[resourceGroup().location]",
            "eastasia",
            "southeastasia",
            "centralus",
            "eastus",
            "eastus2",
            "westus",
            "northcentralus",
            "southcentralus",
            "northeurope",
            "westeurope",
            "japanwest",
            "japaneast",
            "brazilsouth",
            "australiaeast",
            "australiasoutheast",
            "southindia",
            "centralindia",
            "westindia",
            "canadacentral",
            "canadaeast",
            "uksouth",
            "ukwest",
            "westcentralus",
            "westus2"
         ],
         "metadata": {
            "description": "Location of the Logic App."
         }
      }
   },
   "variables": {},
   "resources": [
      {
         "name": "[parameters('LogicAppName')]",
         "type": "Microsoft.Logic/workflows",
         "location": "[parameters('LogicAppLocation')]",
         "tags": {
            "displayName": "LogicApp"
         },
         "apiVersion": "2016-06-01",
         "properties": {
            "definition": {
               "$schema": "https://schema.management.azure.com/providers/Microsoft.Logic/schemas/2016-06-01/workflowdefinition.json#",
               "actions": {
                  "HTTP": {
                     "type": "Http",
                     "inputs": {
                        "method": "GET",
                        "uri": "https://www.microsoft.com",
                        "authentication": {
                           "type": "Basic",
                           "username": "@parameters('basicAuthUsernameParam')",
                           "password": "@parameters('basicAuthPasswordParam')"
                        }
                     },
                  "runAfter": {}
                  }
               },
               "parameters": {
                  "basicAuthPasswordParam": {
                     "type": "securestring"
                  },
                  "basicAuthUsernameParam": {
                     "type": "securestring"
                  }
               },
               "triggers": {
                  "manual": {
                     "type": "Request",
                     "kind": "Http",
                     "inputs": {
                        "schema": {}
                     }
                  }
               },
               "contentVersion": "1.0.0.0",
               "outputs": {}
            },
            "parameters": {
               "basicAuthPasswordParam": {
                  "value": "[parameters('TemplatePasswordParam')]"
               },
               "basicAuthUsernameParam": {
                  "value": "[parameters('TemplateUsernameParam')]"
               }
            }
         }
      }
   ],
   "outputs": {}
}

Access for outbound calls to other services and systems

Based on the target endpoint's capability, outbound calls sent by the HTTP trigger or HTTP action, support encryption and are secured with Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0, 1.1, or 1.2, previously known as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Logic Apps negotiates with the target endpoint over using the highest possible version that's supported. For example, if the target endpoint supports 1.2, the HTTP trigger or action uses 1.2 first. Otherwise, the connector uses the next highest supported version.

Here is information about TLS/SSL self-signed certificates:

Here are more ways that you can help secure endpoints that handle calls sent from your logic app:

  • Add authentication to outbound requests.

    When you use the HTTP trigger or action to send outbound calls, you can add authentication to the request that's sent by your logic app. For example, you can select these authentication types:

  • Restrict access from logic app IP addresses.

    All calls to endpoints from logic apps originate from specific designated IP addresses that are based on your logic apps' regions. You can add filtering that accepts requests only from those IP addresses. To get these IP addresses, see Limits and configuration for Azure Logic Apps.

  • Improve security for connections to on-premises systems.

    Azure Logic Apps provides integration with these services to help provide more secure and reliable on-premises communication.

    • On-premises data gateway

      Many managed connectors in Azure Logic Apps facilitate secured connections to on-premises systems, such as File System, SQL, SharePoint, and DB2. The gateway sends data from on-premises sources on encrypted channels through the Azure Service Bus. All traffic originates as secured outbound traffic from the gateway agent. Learn how the on-premises data gateway works.

    • Connect through Azure API Management

      Azure API Management provides on-premises connection options, such as site-to-site virtual private network and ExpressRoute integration for secured proxy and communication to on-premises systems. If you have an API that provides access to your on-premises system, and you exposed that API by creating an API Management service instance, you can call that API in your logic app's workflow by selecting the built-in API Management trigger or action in the Logic App Designer.

      Note

      The connector shows only those API Management services where you have permissions to view and connect, but doesn't show consumption-based API Management services.

      1. In the Logic App Designer, enter api management in the search box. Choose the step based on whether you're adding a trigger or an action:

        • If you're adding a trigger, which is always the first step in your workflow, select Choose an Azure API Management trigger.

        • If you're adding an action, select Choose an Azure API Management action.

        This example adds a trigger:

        Add Azure API Management trigger

      2. Select your previously created API Management service instance.

        Select API Management service instance

      3. Select the API call to use.

        Select existing API

Add authentication to outbound calls

HTTP and HTTPS endpoints support various kinds of authentication. On some triggers and actions that you use for sending outbound calls or requests to these endpoints, you can specify an authentication type. In the Logic App Designer, triggers and actions that support choosing an authentication type have an Authentication property. However, this property might not always appear by default. In these cases, on the trigger or action, open the Add new parameter list, and select Authentication.

Important

To protect sensitive information that your logic app handles, use secured parameters and encode data as necessary. For more information about using and securing parameters, see Access to parameter inputs.

Authentication types for triggers and actions that support authentication

This table identifies the authentication types that are available on the triggers and actions where you can select an authentication type:

Authentication type Supported triggers and actions
Basic Azure API Management, Azure App Services, HTTP, HTTP + Swagger, HTTP Webhook
Client Certificate Azure API Management, Azure App Services, HTTP, HTTP + Swagger, HTTP Webhook
Active Directory OAuth Azure API Management, Azure App Services, Azure Functions, HTTP, HTTP + Swagger, HTTP Webhook
Raw Azure API Management, Azure App Services, Azure Functions, HTTP, HTTP + Swagger, HTTP Webhook
Managed identity Built-in triggers and actions

Azure API Management, Azure App Services, Azure Functions, HTTP, HTTP Webhook

Managed connectors

Azure AD Identity Protection, Azure Automation, Azure Container Instance, Azure Data Explorer, Azure Data Factory, Azure Data Lake, Azure Event Grid, Azure IoT Central V3, Azure Key Vault, Azure Resource Manager, Azure Sentinel, HTTP with Azure AD

Note: Support for managed connectors is currently in preview.

Basic authentication

If the Basic option is available, specify these property values:

Property (designer) Property (JSON) Required Value Description
Authentication type Yes Basic The authentication type to use
Username username Yes <user-name> The user name for authenticating access to the target service endpoint
Password password Yes <password> The password for authenticating access to the target service endpoint

When you use secured parameters to handle and secure sensitive information, for example, in an Azure Resource Manager template for automating deployment, you can use expressions to access these parameter values at runtime. This example HTTP action definition specifies the authentication type as Basic and uses the parameters() function to get the parameter values:

"HTTP": {
   "type": "Http",
   "inputs": {
      "method": "GET",
      "uri": "@parameters('endpointUrlParam')",
      "authentication": {
         "type": "Basic",
         "username": "@parameters('userNameParam')",
         "password": "@parameters('passwordParam')"
      }
  },
  "runAfter": {}
}

Client Certificate authentication

If the Client Certificate option is available, specify these property values:

Property (designer) Property (JSON) Required Value Description
Authentication type Yes Client Certificate
or
ClientCertificate
The authentication type to use. You can manage certificates with Azure API Management.

Note: Custom connectors don't support certificate-based authentication for both inbound and outbound calls.
Pfx pfx Yes <encoded-pfx-file-content> The base64-encoded content from a Personal Information Exchange (PFX) file

To convert the PFX file into base64-encoded format, you can use PowerShell by following these steps:

1. Save the certificate content into a variable:

$pfx_cert = get-content 'c:\certificate.pfx' -Encoding Byte

2. Convert the certificate content by using the ToBase64String() function and save that content to a text file:

[System.Convert]::ToBase64String($pfx_cert) | Out-File 'pfx-encoded-bytes.txt'

Troubleshooting: If you use the cert mmc/PowerShell command, you might get this error:

Could not load the certificate private key. Please check the authentication certificate password is correct and try again.

To resolve this error, try converting the PFX file to a PEM file and back again by using the openssl command:

openssl pkcs12 -in certificate.pfx -out certificate.pem
openssl pkcs12 -in certificate.pem -export -out certificate2.pfx

Afterwards, when you get the base64-encoded string for the certificate's newly converted PFX file, the string now works in Azure Logic Apps.

Password password No <password-for-pfx-file> The password for accessing the PFX file

When you use secured parameters to handle and secure sensitive information, for example, in an Azure Resource Manager template for automating deployment, you can use expressions to access these parameter values at runtime. This example HTTP action definition specifies the authentication type as ClientCertificate and uses the parameters() function to get the parameter values:

"HTTP": {
   "type": "Http",
   "inputs": {
      "method": "GET",
      "uri": "@parameters('endpointUrlParam')",
      "authentication": {
         "type": "ClientCertificate",
         "pfx": "@parameters('pfxParam')",
         "password": "@parameters('passwordParam')"
      }
   },
   "runAfter": {}
}

Important

If you have a Logic App (Standard) resource in single-tenant Azure Logic Apps, and you want to use an HTTP operation with a TSL/SSL certificate, client certificate, or Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth) with the Certificate credential type, make sure to complete the extra setup steps for this authentication type. Otherwise, the call fails. For more information, review Authentication in single-tenant environment.

For more information about securing services by using client certificate authentication, see these topics:

Azure Active Directory Open Authentication

On Request triggers, you can use Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth), for authenticating incoming calls after you set up Azure AD authorization policies for your logic app. For all other triggers and actions that provide the Active Directory OAuth authentication type for you to select, specify these property values:

Property (designer) Property (JSON) Required Value Description
Authentication type Yes Active Directory OAuth
or
ActiveDirectoryOAuth
The authentication type to use. Logic Apps currently follows the OAuth 2.0 protocol.
Authority authority No <URL-for-authority-token-issuer> The URL for the authority that provides the access token, such as https://login.microsoftonline.com/ for Azure global service regions. For other national clouds, review Azure AD authentication endpoints - Choosing your identity authority.
Tenant tenant Yes <tenant-ID> The tenant ID for the Azure AD tenant
Audience audience Yes <resource-to-authorize> The resource that you want to use for authorization, for example, https://management.core.windows.net/
Client ID clientId Yes <client-ID> The client ID for the app requesting authorization
Credential Type credentialType Yes Certificate
or
Secret
The credential type that the client uses for requesting authorization. This property and value don't appear in your logic app's underlying definition, but determines the properties that appear for the selected credential type.
Secret secret Yes, but only for the "Secret" credential type <client-secret> The client secret for requesting authorization
Pfx pfx Yes, but only for the "Certificate" credential type <encoded-pfx-file-content> The base64-encoded content from a Personal Information Exchange (PFX) file
Password password Yes, but only for the "Certificate" credential type <password-for-pfx-file> The password for accessing the PFX file

When you use secured parameters to handle and secure sensitive information, for example, in an Azure Resource Manager template for automating deployment, you can use expressions to access these parameter values at runtime. This example HTTP action definition specifies the authentication type as ActiveDirectoryOAuth, the credential type as Secret, and uses the parameters() function to get the parameter values:

"HTTP": {
   "type": "Http",
   "inputs": {
      "method": "GET",
      "uri": "@parameters('endpointUrlParam')",
      "authentication": {
         "type": "ActiveDirectoryOAuth",
         "tenant": "@parameters('tenantIdParam')",
         "audience": "https://management.core.windows.net/",
         "clientId": "@parameters('clientIdParam')",
         "credentialType": "Secret",
         "secret": "@parameters('secretParam')"
     }
   },
   "runAfter": {}
}

Important

If you have a Logic App (Standard) resource in single-tenant Azure Logic Apps, and you want to use an HTTP operation with a TSL/SSL certificate, client certificate, or Azure Active Directory Open Authentication (Azure AD OAuth) with the Certificate credential type, make sure to complete the extra setup steps for this authentication type. Otherwise, the call fails. For more information, review Authentication in single-tenant environment.

Raw authentication

If the Raw option is available, you can use this authentication type when you have to use authentication schemes that don't follow the OAuth 2.0 protocol. With this type, you manually create the authorization header value that you send with the outgoing request, and specify that header value in your trigger or action.

For example, here is a sample header for an HTTPS request that follows the OAuth 1.0 protocol:

Authorization: OAuth realm="Photos",
   oauth_consumer_key="dpf43f3p2l4k3l03",
   oauth_signature_method="HMAC-SHA1",
   oauth_timestamp="137131200",
   oauth_nonce="wIjqoS",
   oauth_callback="http%3A%2F%2Fprinter.example.com%2Fready",
   oauth_signature="74KNZJeDHnMBp0EMJ9ZHt%2FXKycU%3D"

In the trigger or action that supports raw authentication, specify these property values:

Property (designer) Property (JSON) Required Value Description
Authentication type Yes Raw The authentication type to use
Value value Yes <authorization-header-value> The authorization header value to use for authentication

When you use secured parameters to handle and secure sensitive information, for example, in an Azure Resource Manager template for automating deployment, you can use expressions to access these parameter values at runtime. This example HTTP action definition specifies the authentication type as Raw, and uses the parameters() function to get the parameter values:

"HTTP": {
   "type": "Http",
   "inputs": {
      "method": "GET",
      "uri": "@parameters('endpointUrlParam')",
      "authentication": {
         "type": "Raw",
         "value": "@parameters('authHeaderParam')"
      }
   },
   "runAfter": {}
}

Managed identity authentication

When the managed identity option is available on the trigger or action that supports managed identity authentication, your logic app can use this identity for authenticating access to Azure resources that are protected by Azure Active Directory (Azure AD), rather than credentials, secrets, or Azure AD tokens. Azure manages this identity for you and helps you secure your credentials because you don't have to manage secrets or directly use Azure AD tokens. Learn more about Azure services that support managed identities for Azure AD authentication.

  • The Logic App (Consumption) resource type can use the system-assigned identity or a single manually created user-assigned identity.

  • The Logic App (Standard) resource type can use only the system-assigned identity, which is automatically enabled. The user-assigned identity is currently unavailable.

  1. Before your logic app can use a managed identity, follow the steps in Authenticate access to Azure resources by using managed identities in Azure Logic Apps. These steps enable the managed identity on your logic app and set up that identity's access to the target Azure resource.

  2. Before an Azure function can use a managed identity, first enable authentication for Azure functions.

  3. In the trigger or action that supports using a managed identity, provide this information:

    Built-in triggers and actions

    Property (designer) Property (JSON) Required Value Description
    Authentication type Yes Managed Identity
    or
    ManagedServiceIdentity
    The authentication type to use
    Managed Identity identity Yes * System Assigned Managed Identity
    or
    SystemAssigned

    * <user-assigned-identity-ID>

    The managed identity to use
    Audience audience Yes <target-resource-ID> The resource ID for the target resource that you want to access.

    For example, https://storage.azure.com/ makes the access tokens for authentication valid for all storage accounts. However, you can also specify a root service URL, such as https://fabrikamstorageaccount.blob.core.windows.net for a specific storage account.

    Note: The Audience property might be hidden in some triggers or actions. To make this property visible, in the trigger or action, open the Add new parameter list, and select Audience.

    Important: Make sure that this target resource ID exactly matches the value that Azure AD expects, including any required trailing slashes. So, the https://storage.azure.com/ resource ID for all Azure Blob Storage accounts requires a trailing slash. However, the resource ID for a specific storage account doesn't require a trailing slash. To find these resource IDs, see Azure services that support Azure AD.

    When you use secured parameters to handle and secure sensitive information, for example, in an Azure Resource Manager template for automating deployment, you can use expressions to access these parameter values at runtime. For example, this HTTP action definition specifies the authentication type as ManagedServiceIdentity and uses the parameters() function to get the parameter values:

    "HTTP": {
       "type": "Http",
       "inputs": {
          "method": "GET",
          "uri": "@parameters('endpointUrlParam')",
          "authentication": {
             "type": "ManagedServiceIdentity",
             "identity": "SystemAssigned",
             "audience": "https://management.azure.com/"
          },
       },
       "runAfter": {}
    }
    

    Managed connector triggers and actions

    Property (designer) Required Value Description
    Connection name Yes <connection-name>
    Managed identity Yes System-assigned managed identity
    or
    <user-assigned-managed-identity-name>
    The authentication type to use

Block creating connections

If your organization doesn't permit connecting to specific resources by using their connectors in Azure Logic Apps, you can block the capability to create those connections for specific connectors in logic app workflows by using Azure Policy. For more information, see Block connections created by specific connectors in Azure Logic Apps.

Isolation guidance for logic apps

You can use Azure Logic Apps in Azure Government supporting all impact levels in the regions described by the Azure Government Impact Level 5 Isolation Guidance. To meet these requirements, Logic Apps supports the capability for you to create and run workflows in an environment with dedicated resources so that you can reduce the performance impact by other Azure tenants on your logic apps and avoid sharing computing resources with other tenants.

For more information about isolation, review the following documentation:

Next steps