Quickstart: Create and configure Route Server using Azure PowerShell

This article helps you configure Azure Route Server to peer with a Network Virtual Appliance (NVA) in your virtual network using Azure PowerShell. Route Server will learn routes from your NVA and program them on the virtual machines in the virtual network. Azure Route Server will also advertise the virtual network routes to the NVA. For more information, see Azure Route Server.

Diagram of Route Server deployment environment using the Azure PowerShell.

Important

If you have an Azure Route Server created before September 1st and it doesn't have a public IP address asssociated, you'll need to recreate the Route Server so it can obtain an IP address for management purpose.

Prerequisites

  • An Azure account with an active subscription. Create an account for free.
  • Make sure you have the latest PowerShell modules, or you can use Azure Cloud Shell in the portal.
  • Review the service limits for Azure Route Server.
  • If you're running PowerShell locally, you also need to run Connect-AzAccount to create a connection with Azure.

Create resource group and a virtual network

Create a resource group

Before you can create an Azure Route Server, you have to create a resource group to host the Route Server. Create a resource group with New-AzResourceGroup. This example creates a resource group named myRouteServerRG in the WestUS location:

$rg = @{
    Name = 'myRouteServerRG'
    Location = 'WestUS'
}
New-AzResourceGroup @rg

Create a virtual network

Create a virtual network with New-AzVirtualNetwork. This example creates a default virtual network named myVirtualNetwork in the WestUS location: If you already have a virtual network, you can skip to the next section.

$vnet = @{
    Name = 'myVirtualNetwork'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
    Location = 'WestUS'
    AddressPrefix = '10.0.0.0/16'    
}
$virtualNetwork = New-AzVirtualNetwork @vnet

Add a dedicated subnet

Azure Route Server requires a dedicated subnet named RouteServerSubnet. The subnet size has to be at least /27 or short prefix (such as /26 or /25) or you'll receive an error message when deploying the Route Server. Create a subnet configuration named RouteServerSubnet with Add-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig:

$subnet = @{
    Name = 'RouteServerSubnet'
    VirtualNetwork = $virtualNetwork
    AddressPrefix = '10.0.0.0/24'
}
$subnetConfig = Add-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig @subnet

$virtualnetwork | Set-AzVirtualNetwork

Create the Route Server

  1. To ensure connectivity to the backend service that manages Route Server configuration, assigning a public IP address is required. Create a Standard Public IP named RouteServerIP with New-AzPublicIpAddress:

    $ip = @{
        Name = 'myRouteServerIP'
        ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
        Location = 'WestUS'
        AllocationMethod = 'Static'
        IpAddressVersion = 'Ipv4'
        Sku = 'Standard'
    }
    $publicIp = New-AzPublicIpAddress @ip
    
  2. Create the Azure Route Server with New-AzRouteServer. This example creates an Azure Route Server named myRouteServer in the WestUS location. The HostedSubnet is the resource ID of the RouteServerSubnet created in the previous section.

    $rs = @{
        RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
        ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
        Location = 'WestUS'
        HostedSubnet = $subnetConfig.Id
        PublicIP = $publicIp
    }
    New-AzRouteServer @rs 
    

Create BGP peering with an NVA

To establish BGP peering from the Route Server to your NVA use Add-AzRouteServerPeer:

The “your_nva_ip” is the virtual network IP assigned to the NVA. The “your_nva_asn” is the Autonomous System Number (ASN) configured in the NVA. The ASN can be any 16-bit number other than the ones in the range of 65515-65520. This range of ASNs are reserved by Microsoft.

$peer = @{
    PeerName = 'myNVA"
    PeerIp = '192.168.0.1'
    PeerAsn = '65501'
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = myRouteServerRG'
}
Add-AzRouteServerPeer @peer

To set up peering with a different NVA or another instance of the same NVA for redundancy, use the same command as above with different PeerName, PeerIp, and PeerAsn.

Complete the configuration on the NVA

To complete the configuration on the NVA and enable the BGP sessions, you need the IP and the ASN of Azure Route Server. You can get this information by using Get-AzRouteServer:

$routeserver = @{
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
} 
Get-AzRouteServer @routeserver

The output will look like the following:

RouteServerAsn : 65515
RouteServerIps : {10.5.10.4, 10.5.10.5}

Configure route exchange

If you have an ExpressRoute and an Azure VPN gateway in the same virtual network and you want them to exchange routes, you can enable route exchange on the Azure Route Server.

  1. To enable route exchange between Azure Route Server and the gateway(s) use Update-AzRouteServer with the -AllowBranchToBranchTraffic flag:
$routeserver = @{
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
    AllowBranchToBranchTraffic
}  
Update-AzRouteServer @routeserver 
  1. To disable route exchange between Azure Route Server and the gateway(s) use Update-AzRouteServer without the -AllowBranchToBranchTraffic flag:
$routeserver = @{
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
}  
Update-AzRouteServer @routeserver 

Troubleshooting

Use the Get-AzRouteServerPeerAdvertisedRoute to view routes advertised by the Azure Route Server.

$remotepeer = @{
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
    PeerName = 'myNVA'
}
Get-AzRouteServerPeerAdvertisedRoute @routeserver

Use the Get-AzRouteServerPeerLearnedRoute to view routes learned by the Azure Route Server.

$routeserver = @{
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
    AllowBranchToBranchTraffic
}  
Get-AzRouteServerPeerLearnedRoute @routeserver

Clean up resources

If you no longer need the Azure Route Server, use the first command to remove the BGP peering and then the second command to remove the Route Server.

  1. Remove the BGP peering between Azure Route Server and an NVA with Remove-AzRouteServerPeer:
$peer = @{
    PeerName = 'myNVA'
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
} 
Remove-AzRouteServerPeer @peer
  1. Remove the Azure Route Server with Remove-AzRouteServer:
$routeserver = @{
    RouteServerName = 'myRouteServer'
    ResourceGroupName = 'myRouteServerRG'
} 
Remove-AzRouteServer @routeserver

Next steps

After you've created the Azure Route Server, continue on to learn more about how Azure Route Server interacts with ExpressRoute and VPN Gateways: