Encoding.IsAlwaysNormalized Method

Definition

Gets a value indicating whether the current encoding is always normalized.

Overloads

IsAlwaysNormalized()

Gets a value indicating whether the current encoding is always normalized, using the default normalization form.

IsAlwaysNormalized(NormalizationForm)

When overridden in a derived class, gets a value indicating whether the current encoding is always normalized, using the specified normalization form.

IsAlwaysNormalized()

Gets a value indicating whether the current encoding is always normalized, using the default normalization form.

public:
 bool IsAlwaysNormalized();
[System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComVisible(false)]
public bool IsAlwaysNormalized ();
member this.IsAlwaysNormalized : unit -> bool
Public Function IsAlwaysNormalized () As Boolean

Returns

true if the current Encoding is always normalized; otherwise, false. The default is false.

Attributes

Remarks

The default normalization form is FormC, which uses full canonical decomposition, followed by the replacement of sequences with their primary composites, if possible.

See also

IsAlwaysNormalized(NormalizationForm)

When overridden in a derived class, gets a value indicating whether the current encoding is always normalized, using the specified normalization form.

public:
 virtual bool IsAlwaysNormalized(System::Text::NormalizationForm form);
[System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComVisible(false)]
public virtual bool IsAlwaysNormalized (System.Text.NormalizationForm form);
abstract member IsAlwaysNormalized : System.Text.NormalizationForm -> bool
override this.IsAlwaysNormalized : System.Text.NormalizationForm -> bool
Public Overridable Function IsAlwaysNormalized (form As NormalizationForm) As Boolean

Parameters

form
NormalizationForm

One of the NormalizationForm values.

Returns

true if the current Encoding object is always normalized using the specified NormalizationForm value; otherwise, false. The default is false.

Attributes

Remarks

The default normalization form is FormC, which uses full canonical decomposition, followed by the replacement of sequences with their primary composites, if possible.

See also

Applies to