1.1 Glossary

This document uses the following terms:

application programming interface (API): A set of routines used by an application program to direct the performance of procedures used by the computer's operating system. Also called application program interface.

Boolean: An operation or expression that can be evaluated only as either true or false.

Coordinated Universal Time (UTC): A high-precision atomic time standard that approximately tracks Universal Time (UT). It is the basis for legal, civil time all over the Earth. Time zones around the world are expressed as positive and negative offsets from UTC. In this role, it is also referred to as Zulu time (Z) and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). In these specifications, all references to UTC refer to the time at UTC-0 (or GMT).

CSOM array: An ordered collection of values that can be used in an XML request or JSON response text. The values are identified by their position and their position is determined by a zero-based integer index.

CSOM Boolean: A Boolean value that can be used in an XML request or JSON response text. A CSOM Boolean value is either "true" or "false".

CSOM DateTime: An Int64 value that represents the number of 100-nanosecond time intervals that have elapsed since 12:00:00, January 1, 0001. It can be used in an XML request or as a string in JSON response text. The value can represent time intervals through 23:59:59.9999999, December 31, 9999. It can also specify whether a local, UTC, or no time zone applies.

CSOM dictionary: An object that contains an unordered collection of key/value pairs that can be used in an XML request or JSON response text. Each key in a CSOM dictionary has a unique name.

CSOM Double: A 64-bit, double-precision, floating-point value, which is the DOUBLE type described in [MS-DTYP], that can be used in an XML request or as a number in JSON response text. The range of CSOM Double values is from "-1.79769313486232e308" to "1.79769313486232e308".

CSOM GUID: A GUID, as described in [MS-DTYP], that can be used in an XML request or as a string in JSON response text.

CSOM Int32: A 32-bit, signed integer value, which is the INT32 type described in [MS-DTYP], that can be used in an XML request or as a number in JSON response text. The range of CSOM Int32 values is from "-2147483648" to "2147483647".

CSOM Stream: A series of bytes that is used to transfer data and that supports reading, writing, and seeking.

CSOM String: A representation of text as a series of Unicode characters. It can be used in an XML request or JSON response text.

CSOM UInt32: A 32-bit, unsigned integer value, which is the UINT32 type described in [MS-DTYP], that can be used in an XML request or as a number in JSON response text. The range of CSOM UInt32 values is from "0" to "4294967295".

default scalar property set: A set of properties that are retrieved by default for an object. The properties map to fields in a storage schema.

document library: A type of list that is a container for documents and folders.

email address: A string that identifies a user and enables the user to receive Internet messages.

folder: A container for files and other folders. A folder may be encrypted. The semantics of encrypting a folder are implementation-dependent. In the Windows implementation, encrypting a folder does not directly cause any data to be encrypted. Encrypting a folder in Windows has the following consequences of EFSRPC Metadata is created and stored with the folder and an NTFS attribute is set on the folder to signify that it is encrypted. NTFS checks this attribute when any new files or folders are created in the folder. NTFS will automatically encrypt any files or folders created within a folder that has this attribute set.

full URL: A string of characters in a standardized format that identifies a document or resource on the World Wide Web.

globally unique identifier (GUID): A term used interchangeably with universally unique identifier (UUID) in Microsoft protocol technical documents (TDs). Interchanging the usage of these terms does not imply or require a specific algorithm or mechanism to generate the value. Specifically, the use of this term does not imply or require that the algorithms described in [RFC4122] or [C706] must be used for generating the GUID. See also universally unique identifier (UUID).

list: A container within a SharePoint site that stores list items. A list has a customizable schema that is composed of one or more fields.

list item: An individual entry within a SharePoint list. Each list item has a schema that maps to fields in the list that contains the item, depending on the content type of the item.

personal site: A type of SharePoint site that is used by an individual user for personal productivity. The site appears to the user as My Site.

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) address: A URI that does not include a "sip:" prefix and is used to establish multimedia communications sessions between two or more users over an IP network, as described in [RFC3261].

site: (1) A group of related webpages that is hosted by a server on the World Wide Web or an intranet. Each website has its own entry points, metadata, administration settings, and workflows. Also referred to as web site.

(2) A group of related pages and data within a SharePoint site collection. The structure and content of a site is based on a site definition. Also referred to as SharePoint site and web site.

site collection: A set of websites that are in the same content database, have the same owner, and share administration settings. A site collection can be identified by a GUID or the URL of the top-level site for the site collection. Each site collection contains a top-level site, can contain one or more subsites, and can have a shared navigational structure.

static CSOM method: A class method that is accessed through the type name rather than an instance of the class.

Uniform Resource Locator (URL): A string of characters in a standardized format that identifies a document or resource on the World Wide Web. The format is as specified in [RFC1738].

universally unique identifier (UUID): A 128-bit value. UUIDs can be used for multiple purposes, from tagging objects with an extremely short lifetime, to reliably identifying very persistent objects in cross-process communication such as client and server interfaces, manager entry-point vectors, and RPC objects. UUIDs are highly likely to be unique. UUIDs are also known as globally unique identifiers (GUIDs) and these terms are used interchangeably in the Microsoft protocol technical documents (TDs). Interchanging the usage of these terms does not imply or require a specific algorithm or mechanism to generate the UUID. Specifically, the use of this term does not imply or require that the algorithms described in [RFC4122] or [C706] must be used for generating the UUID.

MAY, SHOULD, MUST, SHOULD NOT, MUST NOT: These terms (in all caps) are used as defined in [RFC2119]. All statements of optional behavior use either MAY, SHOULD, or SHOULD NOT.