Set-AuthConfig

This cmdlet is available only in on-premises Exchange. Use the Set-AuthConfig cmdlet to modify the authorization configuration for your Exchange organization. For information about the parameter sets in the Syntax section below, see Exchange cmdlet syntax (https://technet.microsoft.com/library/bb123552.aspx).

Syntax

Set-AuthConfig
   -CertificateThumbprint <String>
   [-Confirm]
   [-DomainController <Fqdn>]
   [-Force]
   [-Server <ServerIdParameter>]
   [-SkipImmediateCertificateDeployment]
   [-WhatIf]
   [<CommonParameters>]
Set-AuthConfig
   [-ClearPreviousCertificate]
   [-Confirm]
   [-DomainController <Fqdn>]
   [-Force]
   [-PublishCertificate]
   [-WhatIf]
   [<CommonParameters>]
Set-AuthConfig
   [-Confirm]
   [-DomainController <Fqdn>]
   [-Force]
   [-NewCertificateEffectiveDate <DateTime>]
   [-NewCertificateThumbprint <String>]
   [-Server <ServerIdParameter>]
   [-SkipImmediateCertificateDeployment]
   [-WhatIf]
   [<CommonParameters>]
Set-AuthConfig
   [-Confirm]
   [-DomainController <Fqdn>]
   [-Realm <String>]
   [-ServiceName <String>]
   [-WhatIf]
   [<CommonParameters>]

Description

The Set-AuthConfig parameter defines Microsoft Exchange as a partner application for server-to-server authentication with other partner applications such as Microsoft SharePoint 2013 and Microsoft Lync 2013 or Skype for Business Server 2015, including the certificate used for signing tokens. It's generally not required for this configuration to be modified except in some cases where you must use a different certificate instead of the self-signed certificate created by Exchange Setup or to use a new certificate after the old one has expired.

You need to be assigned permissions before you can run this cmdlet. Although this topic lists all parameters for the cmdlet, you may not have access to some parameters if they're not included in the permissions assigned to you. To find the permissions required to run any cmdlet or parameter in your organization, see Find the permissions required to run any Exchange cmdlet (https://technet.microsoft.com/library/mt432940.aspx).

Examples

-------------------------- Example 1 --------------------------

Set-AuthConfig -NewCertificateThumbprint DB821B4FCA2A5DA9593B9DE00C86BC5EA35D0FC0 -NewCertificateEffectiveDate 4/17/2013

This example specifies a new certificate and a date when the certificate will become effective.

-------------------------- Example 2 --------------------------

Set-AuthConfig -PublishCertificate

This example immediately rolls over the certificate configured as the next certificate and makes it the current certificate. You must have installed a certificate marked as the next certificate.

Required Parameters

-CertificateThumbprint

The CertificateThumbprint parameter specifies the thumbprint of the certificate to be used by Exchange for server-to-server authentication.

Type:String
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016

Optional Parameters

-ClearPreviousCertificate

The ClearPreviousCertificate switch clears the certificate saved as the previous certificate in the authorization configuration.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-Confirm

The Confirm switch specifies whether to show or hide the confirmation prompt. How this switch affects the cmdlet depends on if the cmdlet requires confirmation before proceeding.

  • Destructive cmdlets (for example, Remove-* cmdlets) have a built-in pause that forces you to acknowledge the command before proceeding. For these cmdlets, you can skip the confirmation prompt by using this exact syntax: -Confirm:$false.

  • Most other cmdlets (for example, New-* and Set-* cmdlets) don't have a built-in pause. For these cmdlets, specifying the Confirm switch without a value introduces a pause that forces you acknowledge the command before proceeding.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:cf
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-DomainController

The DomainController parameter specifies the domain controller that's used by this cmdlet to read data from or write data to Active Directory. You identify the domain controller by its fully qualified domain name (FQDN). For example, dc01.contoso.com.

Type:Fqdn
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-Force

The Force switch specifies whether to suppress warning or confirmation messages. You can use this switch to run tasks programmatically where prompting for administrative input is inappropriate. You don't need to specify a value with this switch.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-NewCertificateEffectiveDate

The NewCertificateEffectiveDate parameter specifies a date when the certificate configured as the next certificate should be used.

Type:DateTime
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-NewCertificateThumbprint

The NewCertificateThumbprint parameter specifies the thumbprint of the new certificate to be used as the next certificate in the authorization configuration.

Type:String
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-PublishCertificate

The PublishCertificate switch specifies that the specified certificate be immediately rolled over as the current certificate. The certificate is immediately deployed to all Client Access servers.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-Realm

The Realm parameter specifies a security realm for partner applications. If a service or user presents a token from a domain that's not an accepted domain in the Exchange organization, the token must contain the specified realm to gain access to resources.

Type:String
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-Server

The Server parameter isn't available in this release.

Type:ServerIdParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-ServiceName

The ServiceName parameter identifies Microsoft Exchange to other partner applications such as SharePoint 2013.

Exchange Setup configures the ServiceName parameter with a specific constant value. You shouldn't change this parameter. Changing the ServiceName parameter can result in server-to-server authentication with partner applications not functioning.

Type:String
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-SkipImmediateCertificateDeployment

The SkipImmediateCertificateDeployment switch specifies that the certificate shouldn't be used immediately. We recommend that you don't use this parameter in a production environment.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016
-WhatIf

The WhatIf switch simulates the actions of the command. You can use this switch to view the changes that would occur without actually applying those changes. You don't need to specify a value with this switch.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:wi
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016

Inputs

To see the input types that this cmdlet accepts, see Cmdlet Input and Output Types (https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?linkId=616387). If the Input Type field for a cmdlet is blank, the cmdlet doesn't accept input data.

Outputs

To see the return types, which are also known as output types, that this cmdlet accepts, see Cmdlet Input and Output Types (https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?linkId=616387). If the Output Type field is blank, the cmdlet doesn't return data.