ConvertFrom-SddlString

Converts a SDDL string to a custom object.

Syntax

ConvertFrom-SddlString
           [-Sddl] <String>
           [-Type <Object>]
           [<CommonParameters>]

Description

The ConvertFrom-SddlString cmdlet converts a Security Descriptor Definition Language string to a custom PSCustomObject object with the following properties: Owner, Group, DiscretionaryAcl, SystemAcl and RawDescriptor.

Owner, Group, DiscretionaryAcl and SystemAcl properties contain a readable text representation of the access rights specified in a SDDL string.

This cmdlet was introduced in PowerShell 5.0.

Examples

Example 1: Convert file system access rights SDDL to a PSCustomObject

$acl = Get-Acl -Path C:\Windows
ConvertFrom-SddlString -Sddl $acl.Sddl

The first command uses the Get-Acl cmdlet to get the security descriptor for the C:\Windows folder and saves it in the variable.

The second command uses the ConvertFrom-SddlString cmdlet to get the text representation of the SDDL string, contained in the Sddl property of the object representing the security descriptor.

Example 2: Convert registry access rights SDDL to a PSCustomObject

$acl = Get-Acl HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\
ConvertFrom-SddlString -Sddl $acl.Sddl -Type RegistryRights

The first command uses the Get-Acl cmdlet to get the security descriptor for the HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ key and saves it in the variable.

The second command uses the ConvertFrom-SddlString cmdlet to get the text representation of the SDDL string, contained in the Sddl property of the object representing the security descriptor.

It uses the -Type parameter to specify that SDDL string represents a registry security descriptor.

Example 3: Convert registry access rights SDDL to a PSCustomObject by using ConvertFrom-SddlString with and without the `-Type` parameter

$acl = Get-Acl -Path HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\

ConvertFrom-SddlString -Sddl $acl.Sddl | Foreach-Object {$_.DiscretionaryAcl[0]}

BUILTIN\Administrators: AccessAllowed (ChangePermissions, CreateDirectories, Delete, ExecuteKey, FullControl, GenericExecute, GenericWrite, ListDirectory, ReadExtendedAttributes, ReadPermissions, TakeOwnership, Traverse, WriteData, WriteExtendedAttributes, WriteKey)

ConvertFrom-SddlString -Sddl $acl.Sddl -Type RegistryRights | Foreach-Object {$_.DiscretionaryAcl[0]}

BUILTIN\Administrators: AccessAllowed (ChangePermissions, CreateLink, CreateSubKey, Delete, EnumerateSubKeys, ExecuteKey, FullControl, GenericExecute, GenericWrite, Notify, QueryValues, ReadPermissions, SetValue, TakeOwnership, WriteKey)

The first command uses the Get-Acl cmdlet to get the security descriptor for the HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ key and saves it in the variable.

The second command uses the ConvertFrom-SddlString cmdlet to get the text representation of the SDDL string, contained in the Sddl property of the object representing the security descriptor.

It doesn't use the -Type parameter, so the access rights shown are for file system.

The third command uses the ConvertFrom-SddlString cmdlet with the -Type parameter, so the access rights returned are for registry.

Parameters

-Sddl

Specifies the string representing the security descriptor in SDDL syntax.

Type:String
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByValue)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Type

Specifies the type of rights that SDDL string represents.

The acceptable values for this parameter are:

  • FileSystemRights
  • RegistryRights
  • ActiveDirectoryRights
  • MutexRights
  • SemaphoreRights
  • CryptoKeyRights
  • EventWaitHandleRights

By default cmdlet uses file system rights.

CryptoKeyRights and ActiveDirectoryRights are not supported in PowerShell Core.

Type:Object
Accepted values:FileSystemRights, RegistryRights, ActiveDirectoryRights, MutexRights, SemaphoreRights, CryptoKeyRights, EventWaitHandleRights
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

Inputs

System.String

You can pipe a SDDL string to ConvertFrom-SddlString.