Enable-PSBreakpoint

Enables the breakpoints in the current console.

Syntax

Enable-PSBreakpoint
      [-PassThru]
      [-Breakpoint] <Breakpoint[]>
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Enable-PSBreakpoint
      [-PassThru]
      [-Id] <Int32[]>
      [-Runspace <Runspace>]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]

Description

The Enable-PSBreakpoint cmdlet re-enables disabled breakpoints. You can use it to enable all breakpoints, or specific breakpoints by providing breakpoint objects or IDs.

A breakpoint is a point in a script where execution stops temporarily so that you can examine the state of the script. Newly created breakpoints are automatically enabled, but can be disabled using Disable-PSBreakpoint.

Technically, this cmdlet changes the value of the Enabled property of a breakpoint object to True.

Enable-PSBreakpoint is one of several cmdlets designed for debugging PowerShell scripts. For more information about the PowerShell debugger, see about_Debuggers.

Examples

Example 1: Enable all breakpoints

This example enables all breakpoints in the current session.

Get-PSBreakpoint | Enable-PSBreakpoint

Using aliases, this example can be abbreviated as gbp | ebp.

Example 2: Enable breakpoints by ID

This example enables multiple breakpoints using their breakpoint IDs.

Enable-PSBreakpoint -Id 0, 1, 5

Example 3: Enable a disabled breakpoint

This example re-enables a breakpoint that has been disabled.

$B = Set-PSBreakpoint -Script "sample.ps1" -Variable Name -PassThru
$B | Enable-PSBreakpoint -PassThru

AccessMode : Write
Variable   : Name
Action     :
Enabled    : False
HitCount   : 0
Id         : 0
Script     : C:\ps-test\sample.ps1
ScriptName : C:\ps-test\sample.ps1

AccessMode : Write
Variable   : Name
Action     :
Enabled    : True
HitCount   : 0
Id         : 0
Script     : C:\ps-test\sample.ps1
ScriptName : C:\ps-test\sample.ps1

Set-PSBreakpoint creates a breakpoint on the Name variable in the Sample.ps1 script saving the breakpoint object in the $B variable. The PassThru parameter displays the value of the Enabled property of the breakpoint is False.

Enable-PSBreakpoint re-enables the breakpoint. Again, using the PassThru parameter we see that the value of the Enabled property is True.

Example 4: Enable breakpoints using a variable

This example enables a set of breakpoints using the breakpoint objects.

$B = Get-PSBreakpoint -Id 3, 5
Enable-PSBreakpoint -Breakpoint $B

Get-PSBreakpoint gets the breakpoints and saves them in the $B variable. Using the Breakpoint parameter, Enable-PSBreakpoint enables the breakpoints.

This example is equivalent to running Enable-PSBreakpoint -Id 3, 5.

Parameters

-Breakpoint

Specifies the breakpoints to enable. Provide a variable containing breakpoints or a command that gets breakpoint objects, such as Get-PSBreakpoint. You can also pipe breakpoint objects to Enable-PSBreakpoint.

Type:Breakpoint[]
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Confirm

Prompts you for confirmation before running the cmdlet.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:cf
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Id

Specifies the Id numbers of the breakpoints to enable. The default value is all breakpoints. Provide the Id by number or in a variable. You can't pipe Id numbers to Enable-PSBreakpoint. To find the Id of a breakpoint, use the Get-PSBreakpoint cmdlet.

Type:Int32[]
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True
Accept wildcard characters:False
-PassThru

Returns an object representing the breakpoint being enabled. By default, this cmdlet doesn't generate any output.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Runspace

Specifies the Id of a Runspace object so you can interact with breakpoints in the specified runspace.

Type:Runspace
Aliases:RunspaceId
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True
Accept wildcard characters:False
-WhatIf

Shows what would happen if the cmdlet runs. The cmdlet isn't run.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:wi
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

Inputs

Breakpoint

You can pipe a breakpoint object to Enable-PSBreakpoint.

Outputs

None or System.Management.Automation.Breakpoint

When you use the PassThru parameter, Enable-PSBreakpoint returns a breakpoint object that represents that breakpoint that was enabled. Otherwise, this cmdlet doesn't generate any output.

Notes

  • The Enable-PSBreakpoint cmdlet doesn't generate an error if you try to enable a breakpoint that is already enabled. As such, you can enable all breakpoints without error, even when only a few are disabled.

  • Breakpoints are enabled when you create them by using the Set-PSBreakpoint cmdlet. You don't need to enable newly created breakpoints.