Lesson 1: Managing Remote Desktop Connections

Remote Desktop is a feature built into Windows that lets you interact with the desktop of a remote computer as if you were logged on to that computer locally. You can use a Remote Desktop Connection to connect from any Windows computer to any other Windows computer on which Remote Desktop is enabled.

After this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Configure Remote Desktop security options.
  • Troubleshoot Remote Desktop connections.

Estimated lesson time: 60 minutes

Understanding Remote Desktop

Remote Desktop is actually a combination of two features. The first feature is the client software that you use to connect to another computer’s desktop. This client software is called Remote Desktop Connection, and you can access it from the Start menu in all versions of Windows Vista. The second feature of Remote Desktop is the portion responsible for accepting connections from the Remote Desktop Connection client. This is the Terminal Services component and, among versions of Windows Vista, appears only in Windows Vista Enterprise, Business, and Ultimate.

Between these client and server components, Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is used to establish a Remote Desktop connection.

Exam Tip

On the 70-622 exam, the term “sharing a desktop” is used to refer to connecting to another computer through a Remote Desktop Connection.

Understanding New Remote Desktop Security Features

Although Remote Desktop is not new to Windows Vista, the version of Remote Desktop native to Windows Vista includes important new security features. You need to understand these security features so that you can configure them properly and be aware of any compatibility problems they might cause.

NOTE Remote Desktop update for Windows XP and Server 2003

You can download an update to Remote Desktop for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 that allows these versions to be compatible with the new security features in Windows Vista. However, be sure not to install this update until you have completed the Practice section of this lesson. The address for the update is http://support.microsoft.com/kb/925876.

Understanding Network Level Authentication

In previous versions of Windows, Remote Desktop established a connection to a remote computer before the user was authenticated. In other words, anyone could connect to a computer with Remote Desktop enabled and be presented with the Log On To Windows screen of that computer. If you could provide the credentials of an account with sufficient privileges, you could then log on and receive a desktop.

However, this behavior was not secure. First, by providing a Log On To Windows screen, Remote Desktop gave attackers an easy method with which to try out user name and password combinations. Second, even if attackers could not guess credentials that worked, every connection attempt to the remote computer demanded relatively significant resources of that computer. This behavior made Remote Desktop–enabled computers particularly susceptible to denial-of-service attacks.

This security problem is addressed by a feature called Network Level Authentication (NLA), which is included in Windows Vista. NLA ensures that a user is authenticated before an RDP connection to the remote computer is established.

When a user running Windows Vista attempts to connect to a remote computer through Remote Desktop, the user receives an authentication prompt such as the one shown in Figure 12-1.

Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_1(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 12-1 Remote Desktop credential prompt

If the remote computer performs NLA, user authentication is completed before the RDP connection is established. If the remote computer is not NLA-compatible, the RDP connection is established first, and the credentials just entered are supplied to the remote computer for authentication.

Server Authentication

Another Remote Desktop security feature new to Windows Vista is server authentication. Server authentication avoids network spoofing by verifying that you are connecting to the correct remote computer or server. By default, Remote Desktop Connection in Windows Vista requests server authentication. If from a Windows Vista computer you attempt to use Remote Desktop to connect to a computer running any earlier version of Windows, you will first receive the warning message shown in Figure 12-2.

Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_1(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 12-2 Warning of no remote server authentication

Configuring Remote Desktop Connection

You can open Remote Desktop Connection from the Start menu by pointing to All Programs, clicking Accessories, and then clicking Remote Desktop Connection. The Remote Desktop Connection dialog box is shown in Figure 12-3. To connect to another computer, simply type a computer name in the Computer text box, and then click Connect.

Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_3(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 12-3 The Remote Desktop Connection dialog box

Clicking the Options button in the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box reveals the Remote Desktop Connection configuration tabs. The following section describes the options available on these tabs.

  • General tab This tab allows you to save all the configuration settings specified in the other tabs, along with a computer name to which to connect, in an RDP file. After you save the file, you can then connect to the remote computer with the desired settings simply by clicking that file.

  • Display tab This tab allows you to specify the dimensions and color depth of the remote desktop.

  • Local Resources tab This tab allows you to choose the local resources (such as printers, clipboard information, and disk drives) that you want available on the remote desktop. It also lets you determine the conditions under which local keystrokes such as ALT+TAB are registered on the remote desktop and whether remote sounds should be played locally.

  • Programs tab This tab lets you automatically configure a program to start on the remote desktop whenever an RDP connection is established.

  • Experience tab This tab allows you to enable and disable graphics features that require additional network bandwidth.

  • Advanced tab This tab allows you to set client options related to server authentication. Three options are available:

    • Always Connect, Even If Authentication Fails (Least Secure) With this option, when Remote Desktop Connection attempts to connect to a computer unable to authenticate itself (a computer running a version of Windows earlier than Windows Vista), the connection continues without warning.
    • Warn Me If Authentication Fails (More Secure) This is the default option. When you select this option, if Remote Desktop Connection attempts to connect to a computer unable to authenticate itself (a computer running a version of Windows earlier than Windows Vista), the warning message shown in Figure 12-2 is displayed before the connection is established.
    • Don’t Connect If Authentication Fails (Most Secure) When you select this option, if Remote Desktop Connection attempts to connect to a computer unable to authenticate itself (a computer running a version of Windows earlier than Windows Vista), the connection is blocked.

    The Advanced tab, along with these three authentication options, is shown in Figure 12-4.

    Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_4(en-us,TechNet.10).png

    Figure 12-4 The Advanced tab of Remote Desktop Connection

    Exam Tip

    You need to understand these three authentication options for the 70-622 exam.

Allowing Remote Desktop Connections

To configure a Windows Vista computer to accept Remote Desktop connections from other computers, you need to enable the feature in the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box. To access this tab, first open the System Control Panel. (You can open the System Control Panel by first clicking System And Maintenance and then System in Control Panel. Alternatively, you can open the properties of Computer in the Start menu or even just enter the keystroke Windows + Pause/Break.) Then, in System Control Panel, click Remote Settings on the Tasks menu, as shown in Figure 12-5.

Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_5(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 12-5 Accessing Remote Desktop settings in Control Panel

This procedure opens the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box, shown in Figure 12-6.

Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_6(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 12-6 Enabling Remote Desktop

By default, in the Remote Desktop area of the tab, the Don’t Allow Connections To This Computer option button is selected. This setting disables or blocks incoming Remote Desktop connections. To allow incoming Remote Desktop connections from any version of the Remote Desktop Client, choose the second option (selected in Figure 12-6). This option is considered less secure because it allows incoming connections from older clients to be established before the remote user is authenticated. If instead you want the local computer to perform user authentication before an RDP connection is established (and thereby reduce susceptibility to denial-of-service attacks), choose the bottom option, Allow Connections Only From Computers Running Remote Desktop With Network Level Authentication. Be aware, however, that this option will block most incoming connections from Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 computers.

Also note that when you enable Remote Desktop in this tab by selecting the second or third option, you are automatically creating a local firewall exception for incoming Remote Desktop connections. You would need to create this firewall exception manually only if it were deleted. But even in that case, you could also just disable and then reenable Remote Desktop in the Remote tab to re-create the firewall exception.

Exam Tip

On the 70-622 exam, expect to see questions related to these settings. For example, if a Windows XP computer cannot connect to a Windows Vista computer through Remote Desktop but other Windows Vista computers can, you know that the third option is selected. To allow the Windows XP computer to connect, choose the second option. Also be aware that you need to be familiar with the term “Network Level Authentication.”

Adding Users to the Remote Desktop Users Group

When you enable Remote Desktop in the System Properties dialog box, the only users who are able to connect to that computer through Remote Desktop are by default administrators on the local computer. To allow other users to connect through Remote Desktop, add them to the Remote Desktop Users group on the local machine. The easiest way to do this is to click the Select Users button in the Remote tab. This procedure opens the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, as shown in Figure 12-7. To add users to the Remote Desktop Users group, simply click Add, and then type in the names of the desired user accounts. (To specify a domain user, be sure to enter the name in the form domain\user name.)

Cc505913.Figure_C12624085_7(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 12-7 Adding users to the Remote Desktop Users local group

NOTE Allow Log On Through Terminal Services

Technically, a user doesn’t really need to be a member of either the Administrators group or the Remote Desktop Users group to connect through Remote Desktop. The user account just needs to be assigned the Allow Log On Through Terminal Services user right. However, all members of both the Administrators and Remote Desktop Users groups are automatically assigned this right.

Troubleshooting Remote Desktop

Aside from networking issues, only five problems can typically block a Remote Desktop connection. If a remote computer is Remote Desktop compatible, yet a local user cannot connect to it through Remote Desktop, be sure to verify that all five of these conditions are met:

  1. Remote Desktop cannot be disabled on the remote computer. You can enable and disable Remote Desktop in the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box.
  2. The authentication options defined in the Remote Desktop Connection client cannot prevent a connection to the Remote Desktop server type.
  3. The NLA options defined at the remote computer (server) cannot prevent a connection from the Remote Desktop Connection client type.
  4. The connecting user needs to be a member of Administrators or Remote Desktop Users on the Remote Desktop server (computer accepting Remote Desktop connections).
  5. In Windows Firewall a firewall exception needs to be defined for Remote Desktop on the computer accepting incoming Remote Desktop connections. (This firewall exception is created by default when you enable Remote Desktop, but it can be deleted.)

Quick Check

  1. Which local groups by default are granted the Allow Log On Through Terminal Services user right?
  2. Where do you configure connection options related to server authentication?
  3. Where do you configure connection options related to NLA?

Quick Check Answers

  1. Administrators and Remote Desktop Users.
  2. You configure connection options related to server authentication in the Remote Desktop Connection options in the Advanced tab of the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box.
  3. You configure connection options related to NLA in the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box.

Practice: Implementing and Troubleshooting Remote Desktop

On the 70-622 exam, you are expected to be familiar with various types of Remote Desktop errors, especially in connections between Windows Vista and Windows XP computers. In this series of practices, you will observe various error messages resulting from such connection attempts, and then you will provide fixes for these errors.

NOTE Substituting Windows Server 2003 for Windows XP

If you do not have access to a Windows XP Professional computer, you can use Dcsrv1 instead. If you do so, however, it’s a good idea to use Local Security Policy to ensure that the Allow Log On Through Terminal Services user right is assigned to the Remote Desktop Users group on Dcsrv1. Also note that when you perform these practices, there will be slight differences between what you see in Windows Server 2003 and what you would see in Windows XP. The wording in the practices reflects the Windows XP user interface.

Even if you do have a Windows XP Professional computer to use for this series of practices, make sure that Dcsrv1 is started before you begin.

Practice 1: Troubleshooting a Remote Desktop Connection to Windows XP, Part 1 (Enabling Remote Desktop)

In this practice, you will attempt to establish a Remote Desktop connection from Vista1 to Xpclient.

  1. Log on to Nwtraders from Vista1 as a standard user (not an administrator).

  2. From the Start menu, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

    The Remote Desktop Connection dialog box opens.

  3. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, type xpclient.nwtraders.msft in the Computer text box, and then press Enter.

    The Windows Security dialog box opens.

  4. In the Windows Security dialog box, type the name of the currently logged-on standard user in the form nwtraders\user name. Then type the associated password and press Enter.

    The Remote Desktop Disconnected message box appears and informs you that the local computer cannot connect to the remote computer.

  5. Click OK to dismiss the error message.

  6. If necessary, spend a few minutes investigating the settings on Vista1 and Xpclient, and then answer the following question: What is the reason that you have received this particular error message?

    Answer: Remote Desktop has not been enabled on Xpclient.

  7. Log on to Nwtraders from Xpclient with a domain administrator account.

  8. On Xpclient, open the System Properties dialog box. (You can find the System Control Panel icon in the Performance And Maintenance category. Alternatively, you can just open the properties of My Computer or enter the keystroke Windows + Pause/Break.)

  9. In the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box, select the Allow Users To Connect Remotely To This Computer check box.

  10. If a Remote Sessions message box appears, read the message, and then click OK.

  11. In the System Properties dialog box, click OK.

  12. Return to Vista1.

  13. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, verify that “xpclient.nwtraders.msft” is still visible in the Computer text box, and then click Connect.

  14. In the Windows Security dialog box, type once again the name of the currently logged-on standard user in the form nwtraders\user name. Then type the associated password and press Enter.

    The Remote Desktop Connection dialog box appears.

  15. Take a few moments to read the message. Note that the message allows you to connect to the remote source, if desired.

  16. Answer the following question:

    Would you have received this message if you were connecting to another Windows Vista computer?

    Answer: No. This particular message appears by default in Windows Vista whenever you use Remote Desktop to connect to a computer that does not support server authentication. (Server authentication for Remote Desktop is not available by default in Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.)

  17. Click No to close the Remote Desktop Connection message box. Leave the Remote Desk-top Connection dialog box open and proceed to Practice 2.

Practice 2: Troubleshooting a Remote Desktop Connection to Windows XP, Part 2 (Server Authentication)

In this practice, you will alter the default Remote Desktop Connection settings on Vista1 and observe the resulting behavior.

  1. On Vista1, in the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, click Options.

  2. In the Advanced tab, in the Authentication Options drop-down list box, select Do Not Connect if Authentication Fails, and then click Connect.

  3. In the Windows Security dialog box, type the name of the currently logged-on standard user in the form nwtraders\user name. Then type the associated password and press Enter.

  4. A Remote Desktop Connection error message appears.

  5. Read the error message. Note that you are no longer given the option to connect.

  6. Click OK to dismiss the error message, and then, in the Advanced tab of the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, select Always Connect, Even If Authentication Fails from the Authentication Options drop-down list box.

  7. Click Connect.

  8. In the Windows Security dialog box, type the name of the currently logged-on standard user in the form nwtraders\user name. Then type the associated password and press Enter.

    The Log On To Windows dialog box appears from the remote Windows XP computer. Then, a Logon Message message box appears and informs you that the local policy of this system does not allow you to log on interactively.

  9. If the Logon Message box has not disappeared on its own, click OK to close it.

  10. If the Log On To Windows dialog box for the Windows XP remote desktop has not disappeared on its own, click the Cancel button to close it.

  11. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, click the Options button to remove the configuration tabs from view.

  12. Leave the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box open and proceed to Practice 3.

Practice 3: Troubleshooting a Remote Desktop Connection to Windows XP, Part 3 (User Rights Issues)

In order for a user to connect to a computer through Remote Desktop, that user needs to be a member either of the Remote Desktop Users group or the Administrators group on the machine in question. In this practice, you add your standard user account to the Remote Desktop Users group and then fix another user-related issue blocking the Remote Desktop connection.

  1. While you are logged on to Nwtraders from Xpclient as a domain administrator, open the System Properties dialog box.

  2. In the System Properties dialog box, in the Remote tab, click Select Remote Users. The Remote Desktop Users dialog box appears.

  3. In the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, click Add. The Select Users Or Groups dialog box appears.

  4. In the Select Users Or Groups dialog box, in the Enter Object Names To Select text box, type the name of the standard user account with which you just attempted to connect to Xpclient from Vista1. Remember to type the account in the form nwtraders\user name.

  5. In the Select Users Or Groups dialog box, click OK.

    In the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, the user account you just added should now be listed in the form NWTRADERS\user name.

  6. In the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, click OK.

  7. In the System Properties dialog box, click OK.

    The procedure you have just performed adds the standard user account to the Remote Desktop Users group on the Windows XP computer.

  8. Return to Vista1.

  9. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, verify that “xpclient.nwtraders.msft” is still visible in the Computer text box, and then click Connect.

  10. In the Windows Security dialog box, type the name of the currently logged-on standard user in the form nwtraders\user name. Then type the associated password and press Enter.

  11. A Logon Message message box appears and informs you that another user is already logged on.

  12. Answer the following questions:

    a. Including local users and remote users, how many users in total can be logged on to a domain-joined Windows XP client computer at once?

    Answer: 1

    b. Under which circumstances can one user remotely kick off a locally logged-on user in order to log on to Windows XP?

    Answer: Only an administrator can kick off another user. In addition, a standard user can kick off another logon session belonging to the same standard user.

  13. If the Logon Message message box has not disappeared on its own, click OK to close it.

  14. Return to Xpclient and log off the current user.

  15. Return to Vista1. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, verify that “xpcli-ent.nwtraders.msft” is still visible in the Computer text box, and then click Connect.

  16. In the Windows Security dialog box, type the name of the currently logged-on standard user in the form nwtraders\user name. Then type the associated password and press Enter.

  17. The Remote Desktop connection from Vista1 to Xpclient is successfully established.

  18. Answer the following question:

    Which four conditions need to be met in order to remotely log on as a standard user to a Windows XP Professional computer from a Windows Vista computer?

    Answer:

    a. Remote Desktop needs to be enabled in the System properties of the Windows XP Professional computer.

    b. The server authentication options in the Remote Desktop Connection on Windows Vista need to be configured to allow the connection even when authentication fails.

    c. The standard user account with which you are trying to connect must be a member of the Remote Desktop Users group on the Windows XP Professional computer.

    d. No other user can currently be logged on to the Windows XP computer in question.

  19. On Vista1, use the Start menu in the Remote Desktop connection to log off the connection to Xpclient, and then log off Vista1.

Practice 4: Troubleshooting a Remote Desktop Connection to Windows Vista (Network Layer Authentication issues)

In this practice, you will configure Remote Desktop settings on Windows Vista. You will then attempt to use Remote Desktop to log on to a Windows Vista computer from Windows XP Professional computer and observe the resulting behavior.

  1. Log on to Nwtraders from Vista1 with a domain administrator account.

  2. Open the System Control Panel.

  3. In the System window, beneath Tasks, click Remote Settings.

  4. In the User Account Control consent prompt, click Continue.

  5. In the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box, select Allow Connections Only From Computers Running Remote Desktop With Network Level Authentication (More Secure).

  6. Click the Select Users button.

  7. In the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, click Add.

  8. In the Select Users Or Groups dialog box, type the name of a standard user account (not an administrator) in the form nwtraders\user name, and then press Enter.

  9. In the Remote Desktop Users dialog box, click OK.

  10. In the System Properties dialog box, click Apply. Leave the System Properties dialog box open.

  11. Switch to Xpclient.

  12. Log on to Nwtraders from Xpclient with the same standard user account you specified in step 8.

  13. Open a Remote Desktop Connection by clicking Start, pointing to All Programs, pointing to Accessories, pointing to Communications, and clicking Remote Desktop Connection.

  14. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, type vista1.nwtraders.msft in the Computer text box, and then press Enter.

  15. In the Remote Desktop Connection credential prompt, enter the credentials of the locally logged-on user. Be sure to specify the user name in the form nwtraders\user name.

    The Remote Desktop Disconnected error message appears and informs you that the remote computer requires NLA.

  16. Answer the following question: Why doesn’t the local computer support NLA?

    Answer: NLA by default does not appear in the Windows XP version of Remote Desktop Connection. By default, it appears only in the versions of Remote Desktop Connection native to Windows Vista and later.

  17. Click OK to close the Remote Desktop Disconnected error message and proceed to Practice 5.

Practice 5: Connecting to Windows Vista Through Remote Desktop

In this practice, you will fix the problem introduced in Practice 4. You will then create a Remote Desktop connection from Windows XP to Windows Vista.

  1. While you are still logged on to Vista1 as an administrator, in the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box, select Allow Connections From Computers Running Any Version Of Remote Desktop (Less Secure).

  2. In the System Properties dialog box, click OK.

  3. Return to Xpclient. In the Remote Desktop Connection dialog box, verify that “vista1.nwtraders.msft” is still visible in the Computer text box, and then click Connect.

  4. In the Remote Desktop Connection credential prompt, enter the credentials of the locally logged-on standard user. Be sure to specify the user name in the form nwtraders \user name

    The Remote Desktop Connection security prompt appears.

  5. In the Remote Desktop Connection security prompt, click Yes to connect to the remote computer despite the certificate errors.

    A Logon Message appears. The message informs you that another user is already logged on to Vista1 and that if you continue, the user will have to disconnect from the computer.

  6. Click Yes to continue, and then quickly switch to Vista1.

    On Vista1, a Remote Desktop Connection dialog box appears on the desktop and informs you that another user is attempting to connect.

  7. On Vista1, read the message, and then click OK.

    Note that if you don’t respond within 30 seconds, the local session will automatically be disconnected (but not logged off), and the Remote Desktop connection will be allowed. Also note that in Windows Vista, the locally logged on user can always choose to cancel the remote user session, even when the remote user is an administrator.

  8. On Vista1, the local user session is disconnected. On Xpclient, a Remote Desktop connection to Vista1 is established.

  9. On Xpclient, use the Start menu to log off the Remote Desktop connection to Vista1, and then log off the local computer.

  10. Answer the following questions:

    a. Can a remote desktop user force a local user to log off Windows Vista?

    Answer: No, but if the local user does not respond, the user session is disconnected (not logged off). No data is lost in the local user session.

    b. Can more than one user stay logged on to a domain-joined Windows Vista computer?

    Answer: Yes, but only one user at a time can be connected to a Windows Vista desktop.

Lesson Summary

  • Remote Desktop allows you to connect to the desktop of a remote computer as if you were logged on to that computer locally.
  • To connect to another computer through Remote Desktop, the feature needs to be enabled on the remote computer, and you need to be a member of either the Administrators group or the Remote Desktop Users group on that remote machine.
  • Remote Desktop in Windows Vista comes with two optional new security features: Network Level Authentication (NLA) and Server Authentication. These features are not compatible with Remote Desktop versions in Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 by default.
  • NLA ensures that a user is authenticated before a Remote Desktop connection is established.
  • Server authentication avoids network spoofing by verifying that you are connecting to the correct remote computer or server.

Lesson Review

The following questions are intended to reinforce key information presented in this lesson. The questions are also available on the companion CD if you prefer to review them in electronic form.

NOTE Answers

Answers to these questions and explanations of why each answer choice is right or wrong are located in the “Answers” section at the end of the book.

  1. You work as a desktop support technician for a company with 200 employees. Approximately half of the company’s client computers are running Windows Vista Enterprise. The remaining clients are running Windows XP Professional.

    Whenever a user named SallyB attempts to use Remote Desktop to connect to a Windows Vista computer named Vista1 from her Windows XP Professional computer, she receives an error informing her that the remote computer requires Network Level Authentication.

    You want to allow SallyB to use Remote Desktop to connect to Vista1 from her Windows XP computer. What should you do?

    1. Add SallyB to the Remote Desktop Users group on Vista1.
    2. Add SallyB to the Administrators group on Vista1.
    3. In the Remote Desktop Connection options on Vista1, configure the Server Authentication settings to always connect, even when authentication fails.
    4. In the System Properties dialog box on Vista1, configure the Remote settings to allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop.
  2. You work as a desktop support technician for a company with 200 employees. Approximately half of the company’s client computers are running Windows Vista Enterprise. The remaining clients are running Windows XP Professional.

    A user named FredL wants to use Remote Desktop to connect to a Windows XP Professional computer, XPClient2, from his Windows Vista computer, Vista2. However, whenever he attempts to do so, he receives an error stating that the connection cannot proceed because Remote Desktop cannot verify the identity of the remote computer. You want to allow Fred to use Remote Desktop to connect to XPClient2 from Vista2. What should you do?

    1. Add FredL to the Remote Desktop Users group on XPClient2.
    2. Add FredL to the Administrators group on XPClient2.
    3. In the Remote Desktop Connection options on Vista2, configure the Server Authentication settings to always connect, even when authentication fails.
    4. In the System properties on Vista2, configure the Remote settings to allow connections from computers running any version of Remote Desktop.

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