IObservableVector<T>.VectorChanged IObservableVector<T>.VectorChanged IObservableVector<T>.VectorChanged IObservableVector<T>.VectorChanged IObservableVector<T>.VectorChanged Event

Definition

Occurs when the vector changes.

public : event VectorChangedEventHandler<T> VectorChanged
// Register
event_token VectorChanged(VectorChangedEventHandler<T> const& handler) const;

// Revoke with event_token
void VectorChanged(event_token const& cookie) const;

// Revoke with event_revoker
VectorChanged_revoker VectorChanged(auto_revoke_t, VectorChangedEventHandler<T> const& handler) const;
public event VectorChangedEventHandler<T> VectorChanged
Public Event VectorChanged As VectorChangedEventHandler (Of T)
function onVectorChanged(eventArgs){/* Your code */}


iObservableVector`1.addEventListener("vectorchanged", onVectorChanged);
iObservableVector`1.removeEventListener("vectorchanged", onVectorChanged);

Remarks

The event handler receives an IVectorChangedEventArgs object that contains data that describes the event.

.NET usage

IObservableVector; isn't hidden for .NET usage. However, it's more common to use the .NET ObservableCollection type as a base class, or implement a List type or interface (generic or nongeneric) and INotifyCollectionChanged separately. If you do use IObservableVector; for .NET code, the base interfaces (and their members) project as IList and IEnumerable<T>. VectorChanged is the only API that's shared between the projections.

See also