Replaceable parameters

Replaceable parameters, or tokens, can be used inside project files to provide values for SharePoint solution items whose actual values aren't known at design time. They're similar in function to the standard Visual Studio template tokens. For more information, see Template Parameters.

Token format

Tokens begin and end with a dollar sign ($) character. On deployment, any tokens used are replaced with actual values when a project is packaged into a SharePoint solution package (.wsp file). For example, the token $SharePoint.Package.Name$ might resolve to the string "Test SharePoint Package".

Token rules

The following rules apply to tokens:

  • Tokens can be specified anywhere in a line.

  • Tokens cannot span multiple lines.

  • The same token may be specified more than once on the same line and in the same file.

  • Different tokens may be specified on the same line.

    Tokens that do not follow these rules are ignored and do not result in a warning or error.

    The replacement of tokens by string values is done immediately after manifest transformation. This replacement allows the user to edit the manifest templates with tokens.

Token name resolution

In most cases, a token resolves to a specific value regardless of where it is contained. However, if the token is related to a package or feature, the token's value depends on where it is contained. For example, if a feature is in Package A, then the token $SharePoint.Package.Name$ resolves to the value "Package A." If the same feature is in Package B, then $SharePoint.Package.Name$ resolves to "Package B."

Tokens list

The following table lists the available tokens.

Name Description
$SharePoint.Project.FileName$ The name of the containing project file, such as, NewProj.csproj.
$SharePoint.Project.FileNameWithoutExtension$ The name of the containing project file without the file name extension. For example, "NewProj".
$SharePoint.Project.AssemblyFullName$ The display name (strong name) of the containing project's output assembly.
$SharePoint.Project.AssemblyFileName$ The name of the containing project's output assembly.
$SharePoint.Project.AssemblyFileNameWithoutExtension$ The name of the containing project's output assembly, without the file name extension.
$SharePoint.Project.AssemblyPublicKeyToken$ The public key token of the containing project's output assembly, converted to a string. (16-characters in "x2" hexadecimal format.)
$SharePoint.Package.Name$ The name of the containing package.
$SharePoint.Package.FileName$ The name of the containing package's definition file.
$SharePoint.Package.FileNameWithoutExtension$ The name (without extension) of the containing package's definition file.
$SharePoint.Package.Id$ The SharePoint ID for the containing package. If a feature is used in more than one package, then this value will change.
$SharePoint.Feature.FileName$ The name of the definition file of the containing feature, such as Feature1.feature.
$SharePoint.Feature.FileNameWithoutExtension$ The name of the feature definition file, without the file name extension.
$SharePoint.Feature.DeploymentPath$ The name of the folder that contains the feature in the package. This token equates to the "Deployment Path" property in the Feature Designer. An example value is, "Project1_Feature1".
$SharePoint.Feature.Id$ The SharePoint ID of the containing feature. This token, as with all feature-level tokens, can be used only by files included in a package via a feature, not added directly to a package outside of a feature.
$SharePoint.ProjectItem.Name$ The name of the project item (not its file name), as obtained from ISharePointProjectItem.Name.
$SharePoint.Type.<GUID>.AssemblyQualifiedName$ The assembly qualified name of the type matching the GUID of the token. The format of the GUID is lowercase and corresponds to the Guid.ToString("D") format (that is, xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx).
$SharePoint.Type.<GUID>.FullName$ The full name of the type matching the GUID in the token. The format of the GUID is lowercase and corresponds to the Guid.ToString("D") format (that is, xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx).

Add extensions to the token replacement file extensions list

Although tokens can theoretically be used by any file that belongs to a SharePoint project item included in the package, by default, Visual Studio searches for tokens only in package files, manifest files, and files that have the following extensions:

  • XML

  • ASCX

  • ASPX

  • Webpart

  • DWP

    These extensions are defined by the <TokenReplacementFileExtensions> element in the Microsoft.VisualStudio.SharePoint.targets file, located in the ...\<program files>\MSBuild\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v11.0\SharePointTools folder.

    You can, however, add additional file extensions to the list. Add a <TokenReplacementFileExtensions> element to any PropertyGroup in the SharePoint project file that is defined before the <Import> of the SharePoint targets file.

Note

Because token replacement occurs after a project is compiled, you should not add file extensions for file types that are compiled, such as .cs, .vb or .resx. Tokens are replaced only in files that are not compiled.

For example, to add the file name extensions (.myextension and .yourextension) to the list of token replacement file name extensions, you would add the following to a project (.csproj) file:

<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" DefaultTargets="Build" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">  
  <PropertyGroup>  
    <Configuration Condition=" '$(Configuration)' == '' ">Debug</Configuration>  
    <Platform Condition=" '$(Platform)' == '' ">AnyCPU</Platform>  
.  
.  
.  
    <!-- Define the following property to add your extension to the list of token replacement file extensions.  -->  
<TokenReplacementFileExtensions>myextension;yourextension</TokenReplacementFileExtensions>  
</PropertyGroup>  

You can add the extension directly to the targets (.targets) file. However, adding the extension alters the extensions list for all SharePoint projects packaged on the local system, not just your own. This extension may be convenient when you are the sole developer on the system or if most of your projects require it. However, because it is system-specific, this approach is not portable, and therefore, it is recommended that you add any extensions to the project file instead.

See also

Developing SharePoint Solutions