Deploy Work Folders with AD FS and Web Application Proxy: Step 2, AD FS Post-Configuration Work

Applies to: Windows Server (Semi-Annual Channel), Windows Server 2016

This topic describes the second step in deploying Work Folders with Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) and Web Application Proxy. You can find the other steps in this process in these topics:

Note

The instructions covered in this section are for a Server 2016 environment. If you're using Windows Server 2012 R2, follow the Windows Server 2012 R2 instructions.

In step 1, you installed and configured AD FS. Now, you need to perform the following post-configuration steps for AD FS.

Configure DNS entries

You must create two DNS entries for AD FS. These are the same two entries that were used in the pre-installation steps when you created the subject alternative name (SAN) certificate.

The DNS entries are in the form:

  • AD FS service name.domain

  • enterpriseregistration.domain

  • AD FS server name.domain (DNS entry should already exist. e.g., 2016-ADFS.contoso.com)

In the test example, the values are:

  • blueadfs.contoso.com

  • enterpriseregistration.contoso.com

Create the A and CNAME records for AD FS

To create A and CNAME records for AD FS, follow these steps:

  1. On your domain controller, open DNS Manager.

  2. Expand the Forward Lookup Zones folder, right-click on your domain, and select New Host (A).

  3. The New Host window opens. In the Name field, enter the alias for the AD FS service name. In the test example, this is blueadfs.

    The alias must be the same as the subject in the certificate that was used for AD FS. For example, if the subject was adfs.contoso.com, then the alias entered here would be adfs.

    Important

    When you set up AD FS by using the Windows Server user interface (UI) instead of Windows PowerShell, you must create an A record instead of a CNAME record for AD FS. The reason is that the service principal name (SPN) that is created via the UI contains only the alias that is used to set up the AD FS service as the host.

  4. In IP address, enter the IP address for the AD FS server. In the test example, this is 192.168.0.160. Click Add Host.

  5. In the Forward Lookup Zones folder, right-click on your domain again, and select New Alias (CNAME).

  6. In the New Resource Record window, add the alias name enterpriseregistration and enter the FQDN for the AD FS server. This alias is used for Device Join and must be called enterpriseregistration.

  7. Click OK.

To accomplish the equivalent steps via Windows PowerShell, use the following command. The command must be executed on the domain controller.

Add-DnsServerResourceRecord  -ZoneName "contoso.com" -Name blueadfs -A -IPv4Address 192.168.0.160   
Add-DnsServerResourceRecord  -ZoneName "contoso.com" -Name enterpriseregistration -CName  -HostNameAlias 2016-ADFS.contoso.com   

Set up the AD FS relying party trust for Work Folders

You can set up and configure the relying party trust for Work Folders, even though Work Folders hasn't been set up yet. The relying party trust must be set up to enable Work Folders to use AD FS. Because you're in the process of setting up AD FS, now is a good time to do this step.

To set up the relying party trust:

  1. Open Server Manager, on the Tools menu, select AD FS Management.

  2. In the right-hand pane, under Actions, click Add Relying Party Trust.

  3. On the Welcome page, select Claims aware and click Start.

  4. On the Select Data Source page, select Enter data about the relying party manually, and then click Next.

  5. In the Display name field, enter WorkFolders, and then click Next.

  6. On the Configure Certificate page, click Next. The token encryption certificates are optional, and are not needed for the test configuration.

  7. On the Configure URL page, click Next.

  8. On the Configure Identifiers page, add the following identifier: https://windows-server-work-folders/V1. This identifier is a hard-coded value used by Work Folders, and is sent by the Work Folders service when it is communicating with AD FS. Click Next.

  9. On the Choose Access Control Policy page, select Permit Everyone, and then click Next.

  10. On the Ready to Add Trust page, click Next.

  11. After the configuration is finished, the last page of the wizard indicates that the configuration was successful. Select the checkbox for editing the claims rules, and click Close.

  12. In the AD FS snap-in, select the WorkFolders relying party trust and click Edit Claim Issuance Policy under Actions.

  13. The Edit Claim Issuance Policy for WorkFolders window opens. Click Add rule.

  14. In the Claim rule template drop-down list, select Send LDAP Attributes as Claims, and click Next.

  15. On the Configure Claim Rule page, in the Claim rule name field, enter WorkFolders.

  16. In the Attribute store drop-down list, select Active Directory.

  17. In the mapping table, enter these values:

    • User-Principal-Name: UPN

    • Display Name: Name

    • Surname: Surname

    • Given-Name: Given Name

  18. Click Finish. You'll see the WorkFolders rule listed on the Issuance Transform Rules tab and click OK.

Set relying part trust options

After the relying party trust has been set up for AD FS, you must finish the configuration by running five commands in Windows PowerShell. These commands set options that are needed for Work Folders to communicate successfully with AD FS, and can't be set through the UI. These options are:

  • Enable the use of JSON web tokens (JWTs)

  • Disable encrypted claims

  • Enable auto-update

  • Set the issuing of Oauth refresh tokens to All Devices.

  • Grant clients access to the relying party trust

To set these options, use the following commands:

Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier "https://windows-server-work-folders/V1" -EnableJWT $true   
Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier "https://windows-server-work-folders/V1" -Encryptclaims $false   
Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier "https://windows-server-work-folders/V1" -AutoupdateEnabled $true   
Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust -TargetIdentifier "https://windows-server-work-folders/V1" -IssueOAuthRefreshTokensTo AllDevices
Grant-AdfsApplicationPermission -ServerRoleIdentifier "https://windows-server-work-folders/V1" -AllowAllRegisteredClients -ScopeNames openid,profile  

Enable Workplace Join

Enabling Workplace Join is optional, but can be useful when you want users to be able to use their personal devices to access workplace resources.

To enable device registration for Workplace Join, you must run the following Windows PowerShell commands, which will configure device registration and set the global authentication policy:

Initialize-ADDeviceRegistration -ServiceAccountName <your AD FS service account>
    Example: Initialize-ADDeviceRegistration -ServiceAccountName contoso\adfsservice$
Set-ADFSGlobalAuthenticationPolicy -DeviceAuthenticationEnabled $true   

Export the AD FS certificate

Next, export the self-signed AD FS certificate so that it can be installed on the following machines in the test environment:

  • The server that is used for Work Folders

  • The server that is used for Web Application Proxy

  • The domain-joined Windows client

  • The non-domain-joined Windows client

To export the certificate, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.

  2. Type MMC.

  3. On the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in.

  4. In the Available snap-ins list, select Certificates, and then click Add. The Certificates Snap-in Wizard starts.

  5. Select Computer account, and then click Next.

  6. Select Local computer: (the computer this console is running on), and then click Finish.

  7. Click OK.

  8. Expand the folder Console Root\Certificates(Local Computer)\Personal\Certificates.

  9. Right-click the AD FS certificate, click All Tasks, and then click Export....

  10. The Certificate Export Wizard opens. Select Yes, export the private key.

  11. On the Export File Format page, leave the default options selected, and click Next.

  12. Create a password for the certificate. This is the password that you'll use later when you import the certificate to other devices. Click Next.

  13. Enter a location and name for the certificate, and then click Finish.

Installation of the certificate is covered later in the deployment procedure.

Manage the private key setting

You must give the AD FS service account permission to access the private key of the new certificate. You will need to grant this permission again when you replace the communication certificate after it expires. To grant permission, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.

  2. Type MMC.

  3. On the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in.

  4. In the Available snap-ins list, select Certificates, and then click Add. The Certificates Snap-in Wizard starts.

  5. Select Computer account, and then click Next.

  6. Select Local computer: (the computer this console is running on), and then click Finish.

  7. Click OK.

  8. Expand the folder Console Root\Certificates(Local Computer)\Personal\Certificates.

  9. Right-click the AD FS certificate, click All Tasks, and then click Manage Private Keys.

  10. In the Permissions window, click Add.

  11. In the Object Types window, select Service Accounts, and then click OK.

  12. Type the name of the account that is running AD FS. In the test example, this is ADFSService. Click OK.

  13. In the Permissions window, give the account at least read permissions, and click OK.

If you don't have the option to manage private keys, you might need to run the following command: certutil -repairstore my *

Verify that AD FS is operational

To verify that AD FS is operational, open a browser window and go to https://blueadfs.contoso.com/federationmetadata/2007-06/federationmetadata.xml

The browser window will display the federation server metadata without any formatting. If you can see the data without any SSL errors or warnings, your federation server is operational.

Next step: Deploy Work Folders with AD FS and Web Application Proxy: Step 3, Set Up Work Folders

See Also

Work Folders Overview