Deploy an Azure Container Service (AKS) cluster

In this quickstart, an AKS cluster is deployed using the Azure CLI. A multi-container application consisting of web front end and a Redis instance is then run on the cluster. Once completed, the application is accessible over the internet.

Image of browsing to Azure Vote

This quickstart assumes a basic understanding of Kubernetes concepts, for detailed information on Kubernetes see the Kubernetes documentation.

Launch Azure Cloud Shell

The Azure Cloud Shell is a free Bash shell that you can run directly within the Azure portal. It has the Azure CLI preinstalled and configured to use with your account. Click the Cloud Shell button on the menu in the upper-right of the Azure portal.

Cloud Shell

The button launches an interactive shell that you can use to run the steps in this topic:

Screenshot showing the Cloud Shell window in the portal

If you choose to install and use the CLI locally, this quickstart requires that you are running the Azure CLI version 2.0.21 or later. Run az --version to find the version. If you need to install or upgrade, see Install Azure CLI.

Enabling AKS preview for your Azure subscription

While AKS is in preview, creating new clusters requires a feature flag on your subscription. You may request this feature for any number of subscriptions that you would like to use. Use the az provider register command to register the AKS provider:

az provider register -n Microsoft.ContainerService

After registering, you are now ready to create a Kubernetes cluster with AKS.

Create a resource group

Create a resource group with the az group create command. An Azure resource group is a logical group in which Azure resources are deployed and managed.

The following example creates a resource group named myResourceGroup in the eastus location.

az group create --name myResourceGroup --location eastus

Output:

{
  "id": "/subscriptions/00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000/resourceGroups/myResourceGroup",
  "location": "eastus",
  "managedBy": null,
  "name": "myResourceGroup",
  "properties": {
    "provisioningState": "Succeeded"
  },
  "tags": null
}

Create AKS cluster

The following example creates a cluster named myK8sCluster with one node.

az aks create --resource-group myResourceGroup --name myK8sCluster --node-count 1 --generate-ssh-keys

After several minutes, the command completes and returns JSON-formatted information about the cluster.

Connect to the cluster

To manage a Kubernetes cluster, use kubectl, the Kubernetes command-line client.

If you're using Azure Cloud Shell, kubectl is already installed. If you want to install it locally, run the following command.

az aks install-cli

To configure kubectl to connect to your Kubernetes cluster, run the following command. This step downloads credentials and configures the Kubernetes CLI to use them.

az aks get-credentials --resource-group myResourceGroup --name myK8sCluster

To verify the connection to your cluster, use the kubectl get command to return a list of the cluster nodes.

kubectl get nodes

Output:

NAME                          STATUS    ROLES     AGE       VERSION
k8s-myk8scluster-36346190-0   Ready     agent     2m        v1.7.7

Run the application

A Kubernetes manifest file defines a desired state for the cluster, including what container images should be running. For this example, a manifest is used to create all objects needed to run the Azure Vote application.

Create a file named azure-vote.yml and copy into it the following YAML code. If you are working in Azure Cloud Shell, this file can be created using vi or Nano as if working on a virtual or physical system.

apiVersion: apps/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: azure-vote-back
spec:
  replicas: 1
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: azure-vote-back
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: azure-vote-back
        image: redis
        ports:
        - containerPort: 6379
          name: redis
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: azure-vote-back
spec:
  ports:
  - port: 6379
  selector:
    app: azure-vote-back
---
apiVersion: apps/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: azure-vote-front
spec:
  replicas: 1
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: azure-vote-front
    spec:
      containers:
      - name: azure-vote-front
        image: microsoft/azure-vote-front:redis-v1
        ports:
        - containerPort: 80
        env:
        - name: REDIS
          value: "azure-vote-back"
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: azure-vote-front
spec:
  type: LoadBalancer
  ports:
  - port: 80
  selector:
    app: azure-vote-front

Use the kubectl create command to run the application.

kubectl create -f azure-vote.yml

Output:

deployment "azure-vote-back" created
service "azure-vote-back" created
deployment "azure-vote-front" created
service "azure-vote-front" created

Test the application

As the application is run, a Kubernetes service is created that exposes the application front end to the internet. This process can take a few minutes to complete.

To monitor progress, use the kubectl get service command with the --watch argument.

kubectl get service azure-vote-front --watch

Initially the EXTERNAL-IP for the azure-vote-front service appears as pending.

NAME               TYPE           CLUSTER-IP   EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)        AGE
azure-vote-front   LoadBalancer   10.0.37.27   <pending>     80:30572/TCP   6s

Once the EXTERNAL-IP address has changed from pending to an IP address, use CTRL-C to stop the kubectl watch process.

azure-vote-front   LoadBalancer   10.0.37.27   52.179.23.131   80:30572/TCP   2m

You can now browse to the external IP address to see the Azure Vote App.

Image of browsing to Azure Vote

Delete cluster

When the cluster is no longer needed, you can use the az group delete command to remove the resource group, container service, and all related resources.

az group delete --name myResourceGroup --yes --no-wait

Get the code

In this quickstart, pre-created container images have been used to create a Kubernetes deployment. The related application code, Dockerfile, and Kubernetes manifest file are available on GitHub.

https://github.com/Azure-Samples/azure-voting-app-redis

Next steps

In this quick start, you deployed a Kubernetes cluster and deployed a multi-container application to it.

To learn more about AKS, and walk through a complete code to deployment example, continue to the Kubernetes cluster tutorial.