Azure Cosmos DB: Build a MongoDB API console app with Java and the Azure portal

Azure Cosmos DB is Microsoft’s globally distributed multi-model database service. You can quickly create and query document, key/value, and graph databases, all of which benefit from the global distribution and horizontal scale capabilities at the core of Azure Cosmos DB.

This quick start demonstrates how to create an Azure Cosmos DB MongoDB API account, document database, and collection using the Azure portal. You'll then build and deploy a console app built on the MongoDB Java driver.

Prerequisites

Before you can run this sample, you must have the following prerequisites:

  • JDK 1.7+ (Run apt-get install default-jdk if you don't have JDK)
  • Maven (Run apt-get install maven if you don't have Maven)

If you don't have an Azure subscription, create a free account before you begin.

Alternatively, you can Try Azure Cosmos DB for free without an Azure subscription, free of charge and commitments. Or you can use the Azure Cosmos DB Emulator for this tutorial with a connection string of

mongodb://localhost:C2y6yDjf5/R+ob0N8A7Cgv30VRDJIWEHLM+4QDU5DE2nQ9nDuVTqobD4b8mGGyPMbIZnqyMsEcaGQy67XIw/Jw==@localhost:10255/admin?ssl=true

Create a database account

  1. In a new window, sign in to the Azure portal.
  2. In the left menu, click Create a resource, click Databases, and then under Azure Cosmos DB, click Create.

    Screen shot of the Azure portal, highlighting More Services, and Azure Cosmos DB

  3. In the New account blade, specify MongoDB as the API and fill out your desired configuration for the Azure Cosmos DB account.

    • ID must be a unique name you wish to use to identify your Azure Cosmos DB account. It may only contain lower case letters, numbers, the '-' character, and must be between 3 and 50 characters.
    • Subscription is your Azure subscription. It will be filled out for you.
    • Resource Group is the resource group name for your Azure Cosmos DB account. Select Create New, then enter a new resource-group name for your account. For simplicity, you can use the same name as your ID.
    • Location is the geographic location where your Azure Cosmos DB instance is located. Choose the location closest to your users.

      Then click Create.

      The new account page for Azure Cosmos DB

  4. The account creation takes a few minutes. Wait for the portal to display the Congratulations! Your Azure Cosmos DB account with MongoDB API is ready page.

    The Azure portal Notifications pane

Add a collection

Name your new database, db, and your new collection, coll.

You can now use the Data Explorer tool in the Azure portal to create a database and collection.

  1. Click Data Explorer > New Collection.

    The Add Collection area is displayed on the far right, you may need to scroll right to see it.

    The Azure portal Data Explorer, Add Collection blade

  2. In the Add collection page, enter the settings for the new collection.

    Setting Suggested value Description
    Database id Tasks Enter Tasks as the name for the new database. Database names must contain from 1 through 255 characters, and they cannot contain /, \, #, ?, or a trailing space.
    Collection id Items Enter Items as the name for your new collection. Collection ids have the same character requirements as database names.
    Storage capacity Fixed (10 GB) Use the default value of Fixed (10 GB). This value is the storage capacity of the database.
    Throughput 400 RU Change the throughput to 400 request units per second (RU/s). Storage capacity must be set to Fixed (10 GB) in order to set throughput to 400 RU/s. If you want to reduce latency, you can scale up the throughput later.

    In addition to the preceding settings, you can optionally add Unique keys for the collection. Let's leave the field empty in this example. Unique keys provide developers with the ability to add a layer of data integrity to the database. By creating a unique key policy while creating a collection, you ensure the uniqueness of one or more values per partition key. To learn more, refer to the Unique keys in Azure Cosmos DB article.

    Click OK.

    Data Explorer displays the new database and collection.

    The Azure portal Data Explorer, showing the new database and collection

Clone the sample application

Now let's clone a MongoDB API app from github, set the connection string, and run it. You'll see how easy it is to work with data programmatically.

  1. Open a command prompt, create a new folder named git-samples, then close the command prompt.

    md "C:\git-samples"
    
  2. Open a git terminal window, such as git bash, and use the cd command to change to the new folder to install the sample app.

    cd "C:\git-samples"
    
  3. Run the following command to clone the sample repository. This command creates a copy of the sample app on your computer.

    git clone https://github.com/Azure-Samples/azure-cosmos-db-mongodb-java-getting-started.git
    
  4. Then open the code in your favorite editor.

Review the code

This step is optional. If you're interested in learning how the database resources are created in the code, you can review the following snippets. Otherwise, you can skip ahead to Update your connection string.

The following snippets are all taken from the Program.java file.

  • The DocumentClient is initialized.

    MongoClientURI uri = new MongoClientURI("FILLME");`
    
    MongoClient mongoClient = new MongoClient(uri);            
    
  • A new database and collection are created.

    MongoDatabase database = mongoClient.getDatabase("db");
    
    MongoCollection<Document> collection = database.getCollection("coll");
    
  • Some documents are inserted using MongoCollection.insertOne

    Document document = new Document("fruit", "apple")
    collection.insertOne(document);
    
  • Some queries are performed using MongoCollection.find

    Document queryResult = collection.find(Filters.eq("fruit", "apple")).first();
    System.out.println(queryResult.toJson());       
    

Update your connection string

Now go back to the Azure portal to get your connection string information and copy it into the app.

  1. From the Account, select Quick Start, select Java, then copy the connection string to your clipboard

  2. Open the Program.java file, replace the argument to the MongoClientURI constructor with the connection string. You've now updated your app with all the info it needs to communicate with Azure Cosmos DB.

Run the console app

  1. Run mvn package in a terminal to install required npm modules

  2. Run mvn exec:java -D exec.mainClass=GetStarted.Program in a terminal to start your Java application.

You can now use Robomongo / Studio 3T to query, modify, and work with this new data.

Review SLAs in the Azure portal

The throughput, storage, availability, latency, and consistency of the resources in your account are monitored in the Azure portal. Let's take a quick look at these metrics.

  1. Click Metrics in the navigation menu.

    Metrics in the Azure portal

  2. Click through each of the tabs so you're aware of the metrics Azure Cosmos DB provides.

    Each chart that's associated with the Azure Cosmos DB Service Level Agreements (SLAs) provides a line that shows if any of the SLAs have been violated. Azure Cosmos DB makes monitoring your SLAs transparent with this suite of metrics.

    Azure Cosmos DB metrics suite

Clean up resources

If you're not going to continue to use this app, delete all resources created by this quickstart with the following steps so you don't incur any charges:

  1. In the Azure portal, select Resource groups on the far left, and then select the resource group you created.

    If the left menu is collapsed, click Expand button to expand it.

    Metrics in the Azure portal

  2. In the new window select the resource group, and then click Delete resource group.

    Metrics in the Azure portal

  3. In the new window, type the name of the resource group to delete, and then click Delete.

Next steps

In this quickstart, you've learned how to create an Azure Cosmos DB account, create a collection using the Data Explorer, and run a console app. You can now import additional data to your Cosmos DB account.