Deploy VMs on your Azure Stack Edge device via Azure PowerShell

APPLIES TO: Yes for Pro GPU SKUAzure Stack Edge Pro - GPUYes for Pro R SKUAzure Stack Edge Pro RYes for Mini R SKUAzure Stack Edge Mini R                  

This article describes how to create and manage a virtual machine (VM) on your Azure Stack Edge device by using Azure PowerShell.

VM deployment workflow

The high-level deployment workflow of the VM deployment is as follows:

  1. Connect to the local Azure Resource Manager of your device.
  2. Identify the built-in subscription on the device.
  3. Bring your VM image.
  4. Create a resource group in the built-in subscription. The resource group will contain the VM and all the related resources.
  5. Create a local storage account on the device to store the VHD that will be used to create a VM image.
  6. Upload a Windows/Linux source image into the storage account to create a managed disk.
  7. Use the managed disk to create a VM image.
  8. Enable compute on a device port to create a virtual switch.
  9. This creates a virtual network using the virtual switch attached to the port on which you enabled compute.
  10. Create a VM using the previously created VM image, virtual network, and virtual network interface(s) to communicate within the virtual network and assign a public IP address to remotely access the VM. Optionally include data disks to provide more storage for your VM.

Prerequisites

Before you can deploy VMs on your Azure Stack Edge device, you must configure your client to connect to the device via Azure Resource Manager over Azure PowerShell. For detailed instructions, see Connect to Azure Resource Manager on your Azure Stack Edge device.

Make sure that you can use the following steps to access the device from your client. You've already done this configuration when you connected to Azure Resource Manager, and now you're verifying that the configuration was successful.

  1. Verify that Azure Resource Manager communication is working by running the following command:

    Add-AzEnvironment -Name <Environment Name> -ARMEndpoint "https://management.<appliance name>.<DNSDomain>"
    
  2. To call the local device APIs to authenticate, enter:

    login-AzAccount -EnvironmentName <Environment Name> -TenantId c0257de7-538f-415c-993a-1b87a031879d
    

    To connect via Azure Resource Manager, provide the username EdgeArmUser and your password.

  3. If you configured compute for Kubernetes, you can skip this step. Otherwise, ensure that you've enabled a network interface for compute by doing the following:

    a. On your local user interface, go to Compute settings.
    b. Select the network interface that you want to use to create a virtual switch. The VMs you create will be attached to a virtual switch that's attached to this port and the associated network. Be sure to choose a network that matches the IP address you'll use for the VM.

    Screenshot of the Compute configuration network settings pane.

    c. Under Enable for compute on the network interface, select Yes. Azure Stack Edge will create and manage a virtual switch that corresponds to that network interface. Don't enter specific IPs for Kubernetes at this time. It can take several minutes to enable compute.

    Note

    If you're creating GPU VMs, select a network interface that's connected to the internet. Doing so enables you to install a GPU extension on your device.

Query for a built-in subscription on the device

For Azure Resource Manager, only a single fixed subscription that's user-visible is supported. This subscription is unique per device, and the subscription name and subscription ID can't be changed.

The subscription contains all the resources that are required for VM creation.

Important

The subscription is created when you enable VMs from the Azure portal, and it lives locally on your device.

The subscription is used to deploy the VMs.

  1. To list the subscription, run the following command:

    Get-AzSubscription
    

    Here's some example output:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> Get-AzSubscription
    
    Name                          Id                                   TenantId
    ----                          --                                   --------
    Default Provider Subscription ...                                  ...
    
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    
  2. Get a list of the registered resource providers that are running on the device. The list ordinarily includes compute, network, and storage.

    Get-AzResourceProvider
    

    Note

    The resource providers are pre-registered, and they can't be modified or changed.

    Here's some example output:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>  Get-AzResourceProvider
    
    ProviderNamespace : Microsoft.AzureBridge
    RegistrationState : Registered
    ResourceTypes     : {locations, operations, locations/ingestionJobs}
    Locations         : {DBELocal}
    
    ProviderNamespace : Microsoft.Compute
    RegistrationState : Registered
    ResourceTypes     : {virtualMachines, virtualMachines/extensions, locations, operations...}
    Locations         : {DBELocal}
    
    ProviderNamespace : Microsoft.Network
    RegistrationState : Registered
    ResourceTypes     : {operations, locations, locations/operations, locations/usages...}
    Locations         : {DBELocal}
    
    ProviderNamespace : Microsoft.Resources
    RegistrationState : Registered
    ResourceTypes     : {tenants, locations, providers, checkresourcename...}
    Locations         : {DBELocal}
    
    ProviderNamespace : Microsoft.Storage
    RegistrationState : Registered
    ResourceTypes     : {storageaccounts, storageAccounts/blobServices, storageAccounts/tableServices,
                        storageAccounts/queueServices...}
    Locations         : {DBELocal}
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

Create a resource group

Start by creating a new Azure resource group and use this as a logical container for all the VM related resources, such as storage account, disk, network interface, and managed disk.

Important

All the resources are created in the same location as that of the device, and the location is set to DBELocal.

  1. Set some parameters.

    $ResourceGroupName = "<Resource group name>" 
    
  2. Create a resource group for the resources that you'll create for the VM.

    New-AzResourceGroup -Name $ResourceGroupName -Location DBELocal
    

    Here's some example output:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> New-AzResourceGroup -Name myaseazrg -Location DBELocal
    
    ResourceGroupName : myaseazrg
    Location          : dbelocal
    ProvisioningState : Succeeded
    Tags              :
    ResourceId        : /subscriptions/.../resourceGroups/myaseazrg
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

Create a storage account

Create a new storage account by using the resource group that you created in the preceding step. This is a local storage account that you use to upload the virtual disk image for the VM.

  1. Set some parameters.

    $StorageAccountName = "<Storage account name>"    
    
  2. Create a new local storage account on your device.

    New-AzStorageAccount -Name $StorageAccountName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Location DBELocal -SkuName Standard_LRS
    

    Note

    By using Azure Resource Manager, you can create only local storage accounts, such as locally redundant storage (standard or premium). To create tiered storage accounts, see Tutorial: Transfer data via storage accounts with Azure Stack Edge Pro with GPU.

    Here's an example output:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> New-AzStorageAccount -Name myaseazsa -ResourceGroupName myaseazrg -Location DBELocal -SkuName Standard_LRS
    
    StorageAccountName ResourceGroupName PrimaryLocation SkuName      Kind    AccessTier CreationTime
    ------------------ ----------------- --------------- -------      ----    ---------- ------------
    myaseazsa          myaseazrg         DBELocal        Standard_LRS Storage            6/10/2021 11:45...
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    
  3. Get the storage account key for the account that you created in the earlier step. When prompted, provide the resource group name and the storage account name.

    Get-AzStorageAccountKey
    

    Here's an example output:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> Get-AzStorageAccountKey
    
    cmdlet Get-AzStorageAccountKey at command pipeline position 1
    Supply values for the following parameters:
    (Type !? for Help.)
    ResourceGroupName: myaseazrg
    Name: myaseazsa
    
    KeyName Value                                                                                    Permissions
    ------- -----                                         ------
    key1    gv3OF57tuPDyzBNc1M7fhil2UAiiwnhTT6zgiwE3TlF/CD217Cvw2YCPcrKF47joNKRvzp44leUe5HtVkGx8RQ==   Full
    key2    kmEynIs3xnpmSxWbU41h5a7DZD7v4gGV3yXa2NbPbmhrPt10+QmE5PkOxxypeSqbqzd9si+ArNvbsqIRuLH2Lw==   Full
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

Add the blob URI to the host file

You already added the blob URI in the hosts file for the client that you're using to connect to Azure Blob Storage in Modify host file for endpoint name resolution of Connecting to Azure Resource Manager on your Azure Stack Edge device. This entry was used to add the blob URI:

<Device IP address> <storage name>.blob.<appliance name>.<dnsdomain>

Install certificates

If you're using HTTPS, you need to install the appropriate certificates on your device. Here, you install the blob endpoint certificate. For more information, see Use certificates with your Azure Stack Edge Pro with GPU device.

Upload a VHD

Copy any disk images to be used into page blobs in the local storage account that you created earlier. You can use a tool such as AzCopy to upload the virtual hard disk (VHD) to the storage account.

Use the following commands with AzCopy 10:

  1. Set some parameters including the appropriate version of APIs for AzCopy. In this example, AzCopy 10 was used.

    $Env:AZCOPY_DEFAULT_SERVICE_API_VERSION="2019-07-07"    
    $ContainerName = <Container name>
    $ResourceGroupName = <Resource group name>
    $StorageAccountName = <Storage account name>
    $VHDPath = "Full VHD Path"
    $VHDFile = <VHD file name>
    
  2. Copy the VHD from the source (in this case, local system) to the storage account that you created on your device in the earlier step.

    $StorageAccountKey = (Get-AzStorageAccountKey -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Name $StorageAccountName)[0].Value    
    $endPoint = (Get-AzStorageAccount -name $StorageAccountName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName).PrimaryEndpoints.Blob    
    $StorageAccountContext = New-AzStorageContext -StorageAccountName $StorageAccountName -StorageAccountKey $StorageAccountKey -Endpoint $endpoint    
    $StorageAccountSAS = New-AzStorageAccountSASToken -Service Blob -ResourceType Container,Service,Object -Permission "acdlrw" -Context $StorageAccountContext -Protocol HttpsOnly        
    <Path to azcopy.exe> cp "$VHDPath\$VHDFile" "$endPoint$ContainerName$StorageAccountSAS"    
    

    Here's an example output:

    PS C:\windows\system32> $ContainerName = "testcontainer1"
    PS C:\windows\system32> $ResourceGroupName = "myaseazrg"
    PS C:\windows\system32> $StorageAccountName = "myaseazsa"
    PS C:\windows\system32> $VHDPath = "C:\Users\alkohli\Downloads\Ubuntu1604"           
    PS C:\windows\system32> $VHDFile = "ubuntu13.vhd"
    
    PS C:\windows\system32> $StorageAccountKey = (Get-AzStorageAccountKey -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Name $StorageAccountName)[0].Value
    PS C:\windows\system32> $endPoint = (Get-AzStorageAccount -name $StorageAccountName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName).PrimaryEndpoints.Blob
    PS C:\windows\system32> $StorageAccountContext = New-AzStorageContext -StorageAccountName $StorageAccountName -StorageAccountKey $StorageAccountKey -Endpoint $endpoint
    PS C:\windows\system32> $StorageAccountSAS = New-AzStorageAccountSASToken -Service Blob -ResourceType Container,Service,Object -Permission "acdlrw" -Context $StorageAccountContext -Protocol HttpsOnly
    
    PS C:\windows\system32> C:\azcopy\azcopy_windows_amd64_10.10.0\azcopy.exe cp "$VHDPath\$VHDFile" "$endPoint$ContainerName$StorageAccountSAS"
    INFO: Scanning...
    INFO: Any empty folders will not be processed, because source and/or destination doesn't have full folder support
    
    Job 72a5e3dd-9210-3e43-6691-6bebd4875760 has started
    Log file is located at: C:\Users\alkohli\.azcopy\72a5e3dd-9210-3e43-6691-6bebd4875760.log
    
    INFO: azcopy.exe: A newer version 10.11.0 is available to download
    

Create a managed disk from the VHD

You will now create a managed disk from the uploaded VHD.

  1. Set some parameters.

    $DiskName = "<Managed disk name>"
    
  2. Create a managed disk from uploaded VHD. To get the source URL for your VHD, go to the container in the storage account that contains the VHD in Storage Explorer. Select the VHD, and right-click and then select Properties. In the Blob properties dialog, select the URI.

    $StorageAccountId = (Get-AzStorageAccount -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Name $StorageAccountName).Id    
    $DiskConfig = New-AzDiskConfig -Location DBELocal -StorageAccountId $StorageAccountId -CreateOption Import -SourceUri "Source URL for your VHD"
    New-AzDisk -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -DiskName $DiskName -Disk $DiskConfig
    

    Here's an example output:.

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $DiskName = "myazmd"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $StorageAccountId = (Get-AzStorageAccount -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Name $StorageAccountName).Id
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $DiskConfig = New-AzDiskConfig -Location DBELocal -StorageAccountId $StorageAccountId -CreateOption Import -SourceUri "https://myaseazsa.blob.myasegpu.wdshcsso.com/testcontainer1/ubuntu13.vhd"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> New-AzDisk -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -DiskName $DiskName -Disk $DiskConfig
    
    ResourceGroupName            : myaseazrg
    ManagedBy                    :
    Sku                          : Microsoft.Azure.Management.Compute.Models.DiskSku
    Zones                        :
    TimeCreated                  : 6/24/2021 12:19:56 PM
    OsType                       :
    HyperVGeneration             :
    CreationData                 : Microsoft.Azure.Management.Compute.Models.CreationDat
                                   a
    DiskSizeGB                   : 30
    DiskSizeBytes                : 32212254720
    UniqueId                     : 53743801-cbf2-4d2f-acb4-971d037a9395
    EncryptionSettingsCollection :
    ProvisioningState            : Succeeded
    DiskIOPSReadWrite            : 500
    DiskMBpsReadWrite            : 60
    DiskState                    : Unattached
    Encryption                   : Microsoft.Azure.Management.Compute.Models.Encryption
    Id                           : /subscriptions/.../r
                                   esourceGroups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.Compute/d
                                   isks/myazmd
    Name                         : myazmd
    Type                         : Microsoft.Compute/disks
    Location                     : DBELocal
    Tags                         : {}
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

Create a VM image from the managed disk

You'll now create a VM image from the managed disk.

  1. Set some parameters.

    $DiskSize = "<Size greater than or equal to size of source managed disk>"
    $OsType = "<linux or windows>" 
    $ImageName = "<Image name>"
    
  2. Create a VM image. The supported OS types are Linux and Windows.

    $imageConfig = New-AzImageConfig -Location DBELocal
    $ManagedDiskId = (Get-AzDisk -Name $DiskName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName).Id
    Set-AzImageOsDisk -Image $imageConfig -OsType $OsType -OsState 'Generalized' -DiskSizeGB $DiskSize -ManagedDiskId $ManagedDiskId 
    New-AzImage -Image $imageConfig -ImageName $ImageName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName  
    

    Here's an example output.

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $OsType = "linux"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $ImageName = "myaseazlinuxvmimage"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $DiskSize = 35
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $imageConfig = New-AzImageConfig -Location DBELocal
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $ManagedDiskId = (Get-AzDisk -Name $DiskName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName).Id
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> Set-AzImageOsDisk -Image $imageConfig -OsType $OsType -OsState 'Generalized' -DiskSizeGB $DiskSize -ManagedDiskId $ManagedDiskId
    
    ResourceGroupName    :
    SourceVirtualMachine :
    StorageProfile       : Microsoft.Azure.Management.Compute.Models.ImageStorageProfile
    ProvisioningState    :
    HyperVGeneration     : V1
    Id                   :
    Name                 :
    Type                 :
    Location             : DBELocal
    Tags                 :
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> New-AzImage -Image $imageConfig -ImageName $ImageName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName
    
    ResourceGroupName    : myaseazrg
    SourceVirtualMachine :
    StorageProfile       : Microsoft.Azure.Management.Compute.Models.ImageStorageProfile
    ProvisioningState    : Succeeded
    HyperVGeneration     : V1
    Id                   : /subscriptions/.../resourceG
                           roups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.Compute/images/myaseazlin
                           uxvmimage
    Name                 : myaseazlinuxvmimage
    Type                 : Microsoft.Compute/images
    Location             : dbelocal
    Tags                 : {}
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> 
    

Create your VM with previously created resources

Before you create and deploy the VM, you must create one virtual network and associate a virtual network interface with it.

Important

The following rules apply:

  • You can create only one virtual network, even across resource groups. The virtual network must have exactly the same address space as the logical network.
  • The virtual network can have only one subnet. The subnet must have exactly the same address space as the virtual network.
  • When you create the virtual network interface card, you can use only the static allocation method. The user needs to provide a private IP address.

Query the automatically created virtual network

When you enable compute from the local UI of your device, a virtual network called ASEVNET is created automatically, under the ASERG resource group.

Use the following command to query the existing virtual network:

$ArmVn = Get-AzVirtualNetwork -Name ASEVNET -ResourceGroupName ASERG 

Create a virtual network interface card

You'll create a virtual network interface card by using the virtual network subnet ID.

  1. Set some parameters.

    $IpConfigName = "<IP config name>"
    $NicName = "<Network interface name>"
    
  2. Create a virtual network interface.

    $ipConfig = New-AzNetworkInterfaceIpConfig -Name $IpConfigName -SubnetId $aRmVN.Subnets[0].Id 
    $Nic = New-AzNetworkInterface -Name $NicName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Location DBELocal -IpConfiguration $IpConfig    
    

    By default, an IP is dynamically assigned to your network interface from the network enabled for compute. Use the -PrivateIpAddress parameter if you are allocating a static IP to your network interface.

    Here's an example output:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $IpConfigName = "myazipconfig1"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $NicName = "myaznic1"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $ipConfig = New-AzNetworkInterfaceIpConfig -Name $IpConfigName -SubnetId $aRmVN.Subnets[0].Id 
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $ipConfig = New-AzNetworkInterfaceIpConfig -Name $IpConfigName -SubnetId $aRmVN.Subnets[0].Id
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $Nic = New-AzNetworkInterface -Name $NicName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Location DBELocal -IpConfiguration $IpConfig
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $Nic
    
    Name                        : myaznic1
    ResourceGroupName           : myaseazrg
    Location                    : dbelocal
    Id                          : /subscriptions/.../re
                                  sourceGroups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.Network/net
                                  workInterfaces/myaznic1
    Etag                        : W/"0b20057b-2102-4f34-958b-656327c0fb1d"
    ResourceGuid                : e7d4131f-6f01-4492-9d4c-a8ff1af7244f
    ProvisioningState           : Succeeded
    Tags                        :
    VirtualMachine              : null
    IpConfigurations            : [
                                    {
                                      "Name": "myazipconfig1",
                                      "Etag":
                                  "W/\"0b20057b-2102-4f34-958b-656327c0fb1d\"",
                                      "Id": "/subscriptions/.../resourceGroups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.
                                  Network/networkInterfaces/myaznic1/ipConfigurations/my
                                  azipconfig1",
                                      "PrivateIpAddress": "10.126.76.60",
                                      "PrivateIpAllocationMethod": "Dynamic",
                                      "Subnet": {
                                        "Delegations": [],
                                        "Id": "/subscriptions/.../resourceGroups/ASERG/providers/Microsoft.Ne
                                  twork/virtualNetworks/ASEVNET/subnets/ASEVNETsubNet",
                                        "ServiceAssociationLinks": []
                                      },
                                      "ProvisioningState": "Succeeded",
                                      "PrivateIpAddressVersion": "IPv4",
                                      "LoadBalancerBackendAddressPools": [],
                                      "LoadBalancerInboundNatRules": [],
                                      "Primary": true,
                                      "ApplicationGatewayBackendAddressPools": [],
                                      "ApplicationSecurityGroups": []
                                    }
                                  ]
    DnsSettings                 : {
                                    "DnsServers": [],
                                    "AppliedDnsServers": [],
                                    "InternalDomainNameSuffix": "auwlfcx0dhxurjgisct43fc
                                  ywb.a--x.internal.cloudapp.net"
                                  }
    EnableIPForwarding          : False
    EnableAcceleratedNetworking : False
    NetworkSecurityGroup        : null
    Primary                     :
    MacAddress                  : 001DD84A58D1
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

Optionally, while you're creating a virtual network interface card for a VM, you can pass the public IP. In this instance, the public IP returns the private IP.

New-AzPublicIPAddress -Name <Public IP> -ResourceGroupName <ResourceGroupName> -AllocationMethod Static -Location DBELocal
$publicIP = (Get-AzPublicIPAddress -Name <Public IP> -ResourceGroupName <Resource group name>).Id
$ipConfig = New-AzNetworkInterfaceIpConfig -Name <ConfigName> -PublicIpAddressId $publicIP -SubnetId $subNetId

Create a VM

You can now use the VM image to create a VM and attach it to the virtual network that you created earlier.

  1. Set the username and password to sign in to the VM that you want to create.

    $pass = ConvertTo-SecureString "<Password>" -AsPlainText -Force;
    $cred = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential("<Enter username>", $pass)
    

    After you've created and powered up the VM, you'll use the preceding username and password to sign in to it.

  2. Set the parameters.

    $VmName = "<VM name>"
    $ComputerName = "<VM display name>"
    $OsDiskName = "<OS disk name>"
    
  3. Create the VM.

    $VirtualMachine =  New-AzVMConfig -VmName $VmName -VMSize "Standard_D1_v2"
    
    $VirtualMachine =  Set-AzVMOperatingSystem -VM $VirtualMachine -Linux -ComputerName $ComputerName -Credential $cred
    
    $VirtualMachine =  Set-AzVmOsDisk -VM $VirtualMachine -Name $OsDiskName -Caching "ReadWrite" -CreateOption "FromImage" -Linux -StorageAccountType Standard_LRS
    
    $nicID = (Get-AzNetworkInterface -Name $NicName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName).Id
    
    $VirtualMachine =  Add-AzVMNetworkInterface -Vm $VirtualMachine -Id $nicID
    
    $image = ( Get-AzImage -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -ImageName $ImageName).Id
    
    $VirtualMachine =  Set-AzVMSourceImage -VM $VirtualMachine -Id $image
    
    New-AzVM -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Location DBELocal -VM $VirtualMachine -Verbose
    

    Here's an example output.

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $pass = ConvertTo-SecureString "Password1" -AsPlainText -Force;
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $cred = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential("myazuser", $pass)
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $VmName = "myazvm"
    >> $ComputerName = "myazvmfriendlyname"
    >> $OsDiskName = "myazosdisk1"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $VirtualMachine =  New-AzVMConfig -VmName $VmName -VMSize "Standard_D1_v2"
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $VirtualMachine =  Set-AzVMOperatingSystem -VM $VirtualMachine -Linux -ComputerName $ComputerName -Credential $cred
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $VirtualMachine =  Set-AzVmOsDisk -VM $VirtualMachine -Name $OsDiskName -Caching "ReadWrite" -CreateOption "FromImage" -Linux -StorageAccountType Standard_LRS
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $nicID = (Get-AzNetworkInterface -Name $NicName -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName).Id
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $nicID/subscriptions/.../resourceGroups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces/myaznic1
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $VirtualMachine =  Add-AzVMNetworkInterface -VM $VirtualMachine -Id $nicID
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $image = ( Get-AzImage -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -ImageName $ImageName).Id
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $VirtualMachine =  Set-AzVMSourceImage -VM $VirtualMachine -Id $image
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> New-AzVM -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -Location DBELocal -VM $VirtualMachine -Verbose
    WARNING: Since the VM is created using premium storage or managed disk, existing
    standard storage account, myaseazsa, is used for boot diagnostics.
    VERBOSE: Performing the operation "New" on target "myazvm".
    
    RequestId IsSuccessStatusCode StatusCode ReasonPhrase
    --------- ------------------- ---------- ------------
                             True         OK OK
    
  4. To figure out the IP assigned to the VM that you created, query the virtual network interface that you created. Locate the PrivateIPAddress and copy the IP for your VM. Here's an example output.

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> $Nic
    
    Name                        : myaznic1
    ResourceGroupName           : myaseazrg
    Location                    : dbelocal
    Id                          : /subscriptions/.../re
                                  sourceGroups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.Network/net
                                  workInterfaces/myaznic1
    Etag                        : W/"0b20057b-2102-4f34-958b-656327c0fb1d"
    ResourceGuid                : e7d4131f-6f01-4492-9d4c-a8ff1af7244f
    ProvisioningState           : Succeeded
    Tags                        :
    VirtualMachine              : null
    IpConfigurations            : [
                                    {
                                      "Name": "myazipconfig1",
                                      "Etag":
                                  "W/\"0b20057b-2102-4f34-958b-656327c0fb1d\"",
                                      "Id": "/subscriptions/.../resourceGroups/myaseazrg/providers/Microsoft.
                                  Network/networkInterfaces/myaznic1/ipConfigurations/my
                                  azipconfig1",
                                      "PrivateIpAddress": "10.126.76.60",
                                      "PrivateIpAllocationMethod": "Dynamic",
                                      "Subnet": {
                                        "Delegations": [],
                                        "Id": "/subscriptions/.../resourceGroups/ASERG/providers/Microsoft.Ne
                                  twork/virtualNetworks/ASEVNET/subnets/ASEVNETsubNet",
                                        "ServiceAssociationLinks": []
                                      },
                                      "ProvisioningState": "Succeeded",
                                      "PrivateIpAddressVersion": "IPv4",
                                      "LoadBalancerBackendAddressPools": [],
                                      "LoadBalancerInboundNatRules": [],
                                      "Primary": true,
                                      "ApplicationGatewayBackendAddressPools": [],
                                      "ApplicationSecurityGroups": []
                                    }
                                  ]
    DnsSettings                 : {
                                    "DnsServers": [],
                                    "AppliedDnsServers": [],
                                    "InternalDomainNameSuffix": "auwlfcx0dhxurjgisct43fc
                                  ywb.a--x.internal.cloudapp.net"
                                  }
    EnableIPForwarding          : False
    EnableAcceleratedNetworking : False
    NetworkSecurityGroup        : null
    Primary                     :
    MacAddress                  : 001DD84A58D1
    
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

Connect to the VM

Depending on whether you created a Windows VM or a Linux VM, the connection instructions can be different.

Connect to a Linux VM

To connect to a Linux VM, do the following:

Connect to the VM by using the private IP that you passed during the VM creation.

  1. Open an SSH session to connect with the IP address.

    ssh -l <username> <ip address>
    
  2. At the prompt, provide the password that you used when you created the VM.

    If you need to provide the SSH key, use this command.

    ssh -i c:/users/Administrator/.ssh/id_rsa Administrator@5.5.41.236

    Here's an example output when you connect to the VM:

    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> ssh -l myazuser "10.126.76.60"
    The authenticity of host '10.126.76.60 (10.126.76.60)' can't be established.
    ECDSA key fingerprint is SHA256:V649Zbo58zAYMKreeP7M6w7Na0Yf9QPg4SM7JZVV0E4.
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no/[fingerprint])? yes
    Warning: Permanently added '10.126.76.60' (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
    myazuser@10.126.76.60's password:
    Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (GNU/Linux 4.18.0-1013-azure x86_64)
    
     * Documentation:  https://help.ubuntu.com
     * Management:     https://landscape.canonical.com
     * Support:        https://ubuntu.com/advantage
    
     System information disabled due to load higher than 1.0
    
      Get cloud support with Ubuntu Advantage Cloud Guest:
        http://www.ubuntu.com/business/services/cloud
    
    284 packages can be updated.
    192 updates are security updates. 
    
    The programs included with the Ubuntu system are free software;
    the exact distribution terms for each program are described in the
    individual files in /usr/share/doc/*/copyright.
    
    Ubuntu comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by
    applicable law.
    
    To run a command as administrator (user "root"), use "sudo <command>".
    See "man sudo_root" for details.
    
    myazuser@myazvmfriendlyname:~$ client_loop: send disconnect: Connection reset
    PS C:\WINDOWS\system32>
    

If you used a public IP address during the VM creation, you can use that IP to connect to the VM. To get the public IP, run the following command:

$publicIp = Get-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $PublicIp -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName

In this instance, the public IP is the same as the private IP that you passed during the creation of the virtual network interface.

Connect to a Windows VM

To connect to a Windows VM, do the following:

Connect to your Windows VM by using the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) via the IP that you passed during the VM creation.

  1. On your client, open RDP.

  2. Go to Start, and then enter mstsc.

  3. On the Remote Desktop Connection pane, enter the IP address of the VM and the access credentials you used in the VM template parameters file. Then select Connect.

    Screenshot of the Remote Desktop Connection pane for connecting via RDP to your Windows VM.

    Note

    You might need to approve connecting to an untrusted machine.

You're now signed in to your VM that runs on the appliance.

Manage the VM

The following sections describe some of the common operations that you can create on your Azure Stack Edge Pro device.

List VMs that are running on the device

To return a list of all the VMs that are running on your Azure Stack Edge device, run this command:

Get-AzVM -ResourceGroupName <String> -Name <String>

For more information about this cmdlet, see Get-AzVM.

Turn on the VM

To turn on a virtual machine that's running on your device, run the following cmdlet:

Start-AzVM [-Name] <String> [-ResourceGroupName] <String>

For more information about this cmdlet, see Start-AzVM.

Suspend or shut down the VM

To stop or shut down a virtual machine that's running on your device, run the following cmdlet:

Stop-AzVM [-Name] <String> [-StayProvisioned] [-ResourceGroupName] <String>

For more information about this cmdlet, see Stop-AzVM cmdlet.

Add a data disk

If the workload requirements on your VM increase, you might need to add a data disk. To do so, run the following command:

Add-AzRmVMDataDisk -VM $VirtualMachine -Name "disk1" -VhdUri "https://contoso.blob.core.windows.net/vhds/diskstandard03.vhd" -LUN 0 -Caching ReadOnly -DiskSizeinGB 1 -CreateOption Empty 
 
Update-AzVM -ResourceGroupName "<Resource Group Name string>" -VM $VirtualMachine

Delete the VM

To remove a virtual machine from your device, run the following cmdlet:

Remove-AzVM [-Name] <String> [-ResourceGroupName] <String>

For more information about this cmdlet, see Remove-AzVm cmdlet.

Next steps

Azure Resource Manager cmdlets