StringDictionary.GetEnumerator Method

Definition

Returns an enumerator that iterates through the string dictionary.

public:
 virtual System::Collections::IEnumerator ^ GetEnumerator();
public virtual System.Collections.IEnumerator GetEnumerator ();
abstract member GetEnumerator : unit -> System.Collections.IEnumerator
override this.GetEnumerator : unit -> System.Collections.IEnumerator
Public Overridable Function GetEnumerator () As IEnumerator

Returns

An IEnumerator that iterates through the string dictionary.

Implements

Examples

The following code example enumerates the elements of a StringDictionary.

#using <System.dll>

using namespace System;
using namespace System::Collections;
using namespace System::Collections::Specialized;

void PrintKeysAndValues1( StringDictionary^ myCol );
void PrintKeysAndValues2( StringDictionary^ myCol );
void PrintKeysAndValues3( StringDictionary^ myCol );

int main()
{
   // Creates and initializes a new StringDictionary.
   StringDictionary^ myCol = gcnew StringDictionary;
   myCol->Add( "red", "rojo" );
   myCol->Add( "green", "verde" );
   myCol->Add( "blue", "azul" );
   
   // Display the contents of the collection using for each. This is the preferred method.
   Console::WriteLine( "Displays the elements using for each:" );
   PrintKeysAndValues1( myCol );

   // Display the contents of the collection using the enumerator.
   Console::WriteLine( "Displays the elements using the IEnumerator:" );
   PrintKeysAndValues2( myCol );
   
   // Display the contents of the collection using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties.
   Console::WriteLine( "Displays the elements using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties:" );
   PrintKeysAndValues3( myCol );
}

// Uses the for each statement which hides the complexity of the enumerator.
// NOTE: The for each statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
void PrintKeysAndValues1( StringDictionary^ myCol )  {
   Console::WriteLine( "   KEY                       VALUE" );
   for each ( DictionaryEntry^ de in myCol )
      Console::WriteLine( "   {0,-25} {1}", de->Key, de->Value );
   Console::WriteLine();
}

// Uses the enumerator. 
void PrintKeysAndValues2( StringDictionary^ myCol )
{
   IEnumerator^ myEnumerator = myCol->GetEnumerator();
   DictionaryEntry^ de;
   Console::WriteLine( "   KEY                       VALUE" );
   while ( myEnumerator->MoveNext() )
   {
      de =  (DictionaryEntry^)(myEnumerator->Current);
      Console::WriteLine( "   {0,-25} {1}", de->Key, de->Value );
   }
   Console::WriteLine();
}

// Uses the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties.
void PrintKeysAndValues3( StringDictionary^ myCol )
{
   array<String^>^myKeys = gcnew array<String^>(myCol->Count);
   myCol->Keys->CopyTo( myKeys, 0 );
   Console::WriteLine( "   INDEX KEY                       VALUE" );
   for ( int i = 0; i < myCol->Count; i++ )
      Console::WriteLine( "   {0,-5} {1,-25} {2}", i, myKeys[ i ], myCol[ myKeys[ i ] ] );
   Console::WriteLine();
}

/*
This code produces the following output.

Displays the elements using for each:
   KEY                       VALUE
   red                       rojo
   blue                      azul
   green                     verde

Displays the elements using the IEnumerator:
   KEY                       VALUE
   red                       rojo
   blue                      azul
   green                     verde

Displays the elements using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties:
   INDEX KEY                       VALUE
   0     red                       rojo
   1     blue                      azul
   2     green                     verde

*/
using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

public class SamplesStringDictionary  {

   public static void Main()  {

      // Creates and initializes a new StringDictionary.
      StringDictionary myCol = new StringDictionary();
      myCol.Add( "red", "rojo" );
      myCol.Add( "green", "verde" );
      myCol.Add( "blue", "azul" );

      // Display the contents of the collection using foreach. This is the preferred method.
      Console.WriteLine( "Displays the elements using foreach:" );
      PrintKeysAndValues1( myCol );

      // Display the contents of the collection using the enumerator.
      Console.WriteLine( "Displays the elements using the IEnumerator:" );
      PrintKeysAndValues2( myCol );

      // Display the contents of the collection using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties.
      Console.WriteLine( "Displays the elements using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties:" );
      PrintKeysAndValues3( myCol );
   }

   // Uses the foreach statement which hides the complexity of the enumerator.
   // NOTE: The foreach statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
   public static void PrintKeysAndValues1( StringDictionary myCol )  {
      Console.WriteLine( "   KEY                       VALUE" );
      foreach ( DictionaryEntry de in myCol )
         Console.WriteLine( "   {0,-25} {1}", de.Key, de.Value );
      Console.WriteLine();
   }

   // Uses the enumerator. 
   // NOTE: The foreach statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
   public static void PrintKeysAndValues2( StringDictionary myCol )  {
      IEnumerator myEnumerator = myCol.GetEnumerator();
      DictionaryEntry de;
      Console.WriteLine( "   KEY                       VALUE" );
      while ( myEnumerator.MoveNext() )  {
         de = (DictionaryEntry) myEnumerator.Current;
         Console.WriteLine( "   {0,-25} {1}", de.Key, de.Value );
      }
      Console.WriteLine();
   }

   // Uses the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties.
   public static void PrintKeysAndValues3( StringDictionary myCol )  {
      String[] myKeys = new String[myCol.Count];
      myCol.Keys.CopyTo( myKeys, 0 );

      Console.WriteLine( "   INDEX KEY                       VALUE" );
      for ( int i = 0; i < myCol.Count; i++ )
         Console.WriteLine( "   {0,-5} {1,-25} {2}", i, myKeys[i], myCol[myKeys[i]] );
      Console.WriteLine();
   }
}

/*
This code produces the following output.

Displays the elements using foreach:
   KEY                       VALUE
   red                       rojo
   blue                      azul
   green                     verde

Displays the elements using the IEnumerator:
   KEY                       VALUE
   red                       rojo
   blue                      azul
   green                     verde

Displays the elements using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties:
   INDEX KEY                       VALUE
   0     red                       rojo
   1     blue                      azul
   2     green                     verde

*/
Imports System.Collections
Imports System.Collections.Specialized

Public Class SamplesStringDictionary

   Public Shared Sub Main()

      ' Creates and initializes a new StringDictionary.
      Dim myCol As New StringDictionary()
      myCol.Add("red", "rojo")
      myCol.Add("green", "verde")
      myCol.Add("blue", "azul")

      ' Display the contents of the collection using For Each. This is the preferred method.
      Console.WriteLine("Displays the elements using For Each:")
      PrintKeysAndValues1(myCol)

      ' Display the contents of the collection using the enumerator.
      Console.WriteLine("Displays the elements using the IEnumerator:")
      PrintKeysAndValues2(myCol)

      ' Display the contents of the collection using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties.
      Console.WriteLine("Displays the elements using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties:")
      PrintKeysAndValues3(myCol)

   End Sub


   ' Uses the For Each statement which hides the complexity of the enumerator.
   ' NOTE: The For Each statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
   Public Shared Sub PrintKeysAndValues1(myCol As StringDictionary)
      Console.WriteLine("   KEY                       VALUE")
      Dim de As DictionaryEntry
      For Each de In  myCol
         Console.WriteLine("   {0,-25} {1}", de.Key, de.Value)
      Next de
      Console.WriteLine()
   End Sub


   ' Uses the enumerator. 
   ' NOTE: The For Each statement is the preferred way of enumerating the contents of a collection.
   Public Shared Sub PrintKeysAndValues2(myCol As StringDictionary)
      Dim myEnumerator As IEnumerator = myCol.GetEnumerator()
      Dim de As DictionaryEntry
      Console.WriteLine("   KEY                       VALUE")
      While myEnumerator.MoveNext()
         de = CType(myEnumerator.Current, DictionaryEntry)
         Console.WriteLine("   {0,-25} {1}", de.Key, de.Value)
      End While
      Console.WriteLine()
   End Sub


   ' Uses the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties.
   Public Shared Sub PrintKeysAndValues3(myCol As StringDictionary)
      Dim myKeys(myCol.Count) As String
      myCol.Keys.CopyTo(myKeys, 0)

      Console.WriteLine("   INDEX KEY                       VALUE")
      Dim i As Integer
      For i = 0 To myCol.Count - 1
         Console.WriteLine("   {0,-5} {1,-25} {2}", i, myKeys(i), myCol(myKeys(i)))
      Next i
      Console.WriteLine()
   End Sub

End Class


'This code produces the following output.
'
'Displays the elements using For Each:
'   KEY                       VALUE
'   red                       rojo
'   blue                      azul
'   green                     verde
'
'Displays the elements using the IEnumerator:
'   KEY                       VALUE
'   red                       rojo
'   blue                      azul
'   green                     verde
'
'Displays the elements using the Keys, Values, Count, and Item properties:
'   INDEX KEY                       VALUE
'   0     red                       rojo
'   1     blue                      azul
'   2     green                     verde

Remarks

The foreach statement of the C# language (for each in Visual Basic) hides the complexity of the enumerators. Therefore, using foreach is recommended, instead of directly manipulating the enumerator.

Enumerators can be used to read the data in the collection, but they cannot be used to modify the underlying collection.

Initially, the enumerator is positioned before the first element in the collection. Reset also brings the enumerator back to this position. At this position, Current is undefined. Therefore, you must call MoveNext to advance the enumerator to the first element of the collection before reading the value of Current.

Current returns the same object until either MoveNext or Reset is called. MoveNext sets Current to the next element.

If MoveNext passes the end of the collection, the enumerator is positioned after the last element in the collection and MoveNext returns false. When the enumerator is at this position, subsequent calls to MoveNext also return false. If the last call to MoveNext returned false, Current is undefined. To set Current to the first element of the collection again, you can call Reset followed by MoveNext.

An enumerator remains valid as long as the collection remains unchanged. If changes are made to the collection, such as adding, modifying, or deleting elements, the enumerator is irrecoverably invalidated and its behavior is undefined.

The enumerator does not have exclusive access to the collection; therefore, enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. To guarantee thread safety during enumeration, you can lock the collection during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization.

This method is an O(1) operation.

Applies to