Advanced formatting options in financial reporting

When you create a report in financial reporting, additional formatting functions are available, including filters for dimensions, restrictions for columns and reporting units, non-printing rows, and IF/THEN/ELSE statements in calculations.

The following table explains the advanced formatting functions that are available when you design reports.

Function Description
Dimension filter To access specific sets of data, you can use dimensions in the row definition and column definition. Many reports use only the natural segment in the row format. However, rows can be modified so that they include dimension values. Dimension filters in the column definition are used to access specific dimension values.
Reporting unit restriction You can set up a report row so that it shows only information that is linked to a specific reporting unit.
Non-printing (NP) rows Non-printing rows are useful on many reports. If several calculations are required in order to obtain a value, these calculations can be hidden on the printed report. Non-printing rows are also useful for troubleshooting report designs and for advanced cell placement.
Column restriction The column restriction in the row definition is useful for hiding values that are relevant only on some rows of the report. When percentage calculations are performed on a row, the column restriction prevents total columns or other columns from being printed when those numbers don't apply.
Column break You can add column breaks in a row definition to show report information side by side. You can add multiple column breaks in a single row definition, and column headers are repeated at the top of each column after the column break. Comments for a report are shown between the column breaks.
IF/THEN/ELSE statement You can modify calculations in a row definition or a column definition.

Advanced cell placement

Advanced cell placement, or forcing, involves the placement of specific values into specific cells. For example, forcing is often used to move the correct balance in a cash flow statement. You can use forcing for the following purposes:

  • Move values from Microsoft Excel into specific cells.
  • Hard-code specific values into a report.
  • Modify signs by copying a value from a previous cell and multiplying that value by -1.

Note: In many cases, you must configure your report definition so that column calculations are done before row calculations. To complete this configuration, follow these steps.

  1. In Report Designer, open the report definition.
  2. On the Settings tab, under Calculation priority, select Perform column calculation first and then row.

Designing the report

When you design a report, you should create all the detail rows first to make sure that values are pulled in as expected. Then add NP (No Print) format overrides to suppress the detail that includes the final values. Important: When you use the CAL format code in the row definition, you can't drill down into transaction detail. For forcing, formulas use the following format: <destination column>=<originating column>.<row code> Separate any additional placements for a row by a comma and a space. Here is an example: D=C.190,E=C.100

Examples of advanced formatting options

The following examples show how to format the row definition and column definition to force a basic cash flow report (example 1) and a statistical report (example 2).

Example 1: Basic forcing

The following table shows an example of a row definition that uses basic forcing.

Row Code Description Format Code Related Formulas/Rows/Units Format Override Normal Balance Print Control Column Restriction Row Modifier Link to Financial Dimensions
100 Cash at Beginning of Period (NP) Account Modifier = [/BB] +Segment2 = [1100]
130 Cash at Beginning of Period CAL C=C.100,F=D.100
160
190

The following table shows an example of column definition that uses basic forcing in the row.

A B C D E F
Header 1
Header 2 A B C D E F
Header 3
Column Type ROW DESC FD FD FD CALC
Book Code/Attribute Category ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL
Fiscal Year BASE BASE BASE
Period BASE BASE BASE
Periods Covered PERIODIC YTD/BB YTD
Formula E-D
Column Width 5 30 14 14 14 14

Example 2: Statistical reports

The following table shows an example of a row definition that uses forcing for a statistical report.

Row Code Description Format Code Related Formulas/Rows/Units Format Override Normal Balance Print Control Column Restriction Row Modifier Link to Financial Dimensions
50 Statistical Information REM
100 Headcount - US CAL 4 ###0.;($###0.)
115 Headcount - International CAL 11 ###0.;($###0.)
130
190 US Sales C +Segment2 = [41*], Segment3 = [00]
220 International Sales C +Segment2 = [41*], Segment3 = [01:99]
250
280
310 US Sales CAL D=C.190,E=C.100,F=(C.100/C.190)
340 International Sales CAL D=C.220,E=C115,F=(C.220/C.115)

The following table shows an example of a column definition that uses forcing for a statistical report.

A B C D E F
Header 1 A B C D E F
Header 2 - - YTD Yearly Sales Staff $ Per Person
Header 3
Column Type ROW DESC FD CALC CALC CALC
Book Code/Attribute Category ACTUAL
Fiscal Year BASE
Period BASE
Periods Covered YTD
Formula E-D
Column Width 5 30 14 14 14 14

Restricting a row to a specific reporting unit

When a report row is restricted to a specific reporting unit, that row shows the linked data only for the named reporting unit and ignores the data for other reporting units in the reporting tree. For example, you can create a row that provides details for the total operating expenses for a specific department. Your report might contain duplicate data if the report contains both a reporting tree and a row definition that has more than just the natural account. For example, you have a reporting tree that lists the six departments in your organization, and you also have a row definition that lists a specific combination of an account and a department in the row. When you generate the report, the specific combination of an account and a department is printed on every level of the reporting tree, even though that department might not match what is in the tree. This behavior occurs because the row overrides what is typically filtered out by the report definition. One way that you can avoid duplication of data is by restricting a row to a specific reporting unit. Note: If a row includes dimensions, and you restrict that row to a child reporting unit, the row amount is included for that child unit and for its parent units, but no duplication occurs.

Restrict a row to a reporting unit

  1. In Report Designer, click Row Definitions, and then select a row definition to modify.
  2. Double-click the appropriate Related Formulas/Rows/Units cell.
  3. In the Reporting Unit Selection dialog box, in the Reporting tree field, select the tree that is assigned in the report definition.
  4. Select a reporting unit, and then click OK. The restriction appears in the cell of the row definition.
  5. Double-click the cell in the Link to Financial Dimensions column of the restricted row, and then enter a link to the financial data system.

Selecting print control in a row definition

You can specify print control codes for each column by using the Print Control cell.

Add print control codes to a report row

  1. In Report Designer, open the row definition to modify.
  2. Double-click the Print Control cell.
  3. In the Print Control dialog box, select a print control code, or press and hold the Ctrl key to select multiple codes. You can also type print control codes directly in the Print Control cell. Use commas to separate multiple print control codes.
  4. Select any conditional print options.
  5. Click OK.

Regular print control codes

The following table describes the regular print control codes for a row definition.

Print control code Interpretation of the print control code Description
NP Non-printing row Prevent the amounts in the row from being printed on the report, and exclude the amounts from calculations. To include a non-printing column in a calculation, refer to the column directly in the calculation formula. For example, non-printing row 240 is included in the following calculation: 230+240+250. However, non-printing row 240 isn't included in the following calculation: 230:250.
CS Currency symbol; use currency format in this row Include the currency symbol in all non-percentage amounts. Percentage values never receive a currency symbol.
XD Suppress row in account detail report Suppress the display of accounts on account detail reports and transaction detail reports. This print control is useful when a row includes multiple accounts that should not be listed on the account detail report or transaction detail report.
X0 Suppress row if all zeros Exclude a row from the report if all cells in that row are either empty or contain zeros. This print control is meaningful only when the option to suppress zero balance isn't selected in the report definition.
B0 Leave zero columns blank Leave columns empty in a row that contain zero amounts.
XR Suppress rollup Suppress a rollup. If the report uses a reporting tree, the amounts in this row aren't rolled up into subsequent parent nodes.
SR Suppress rounding Prevent the amounts in this row from being rounded.
XT Suppress row in transaction detail report Suppress the display of transactions on transaction detail reports. This print control is useful when a row includes multiple accounts that should not be listed on a transaction detail report.

Conditional print control codes

The following table describes the conditional print control codes for a row definition.

Print control code Description
(none) Clear the conditional print selection.
DR Print only the debit balances for this row.
CR Print only the credit balances for this row.

Column Restriction cell in a row definition

The Column Restriction cell in a row definition has multiple purposes. Depending on the type of row, you can use the Column Restriction cell to specify one of the following functions:

  • The cell can limit the printing of row amounts to a specific column. This function is useful if you're creating a tabular balance sheet.
  • The cell can specify the column of amounts to sort.

Using a calculation formula in a row definition

A calculation formula in a row definition can include the +, -, \, and **/* operators, and also IF/THEN/ELSE statements. Additionally, a calculation can involve individual cells and absolute amounts (actual numbers that are included in the formula). The formula can contain up to 1,024 characters. Calculations can't be applied to rows that contain cells of the Link to Financial Dimensions (FD) type. However, you can include calculations on consecutive rows, suppress the printing of those rows, and then total the calculation rows.

Operators in a calculation formula

A calculation formula uses more complex operators than a row total formula. However, can you use the \* and / operators together with the additional operators to multiply (*) and divide (/) amounts. To use a range or sum in a calculation formula, you must use an at sign (@) in front of any row code, unless you're using a column in the row definition. For example, to add the amount in row 100 to the amount in row 330, you can use the row total formula 100+330 or the calculation formula @100+@330. Note: You must use an at sign (@) before every row code that you use in a calculation formula. Otherwise, the number is read as an absolute amount. For example, the formula @100+330 adds USD 330 to the amount in row 100. When you reference a column in a calculation formula, an at sign (@) isn't required.

Create a calculation formula

  1. In Report Designer, click Row Definitions, and then open the row definition to modify.
  2. Double-click the Format Code cell, and then select CAL.
  3. In the Related Formulas/Rows/Units cell, type the calculation formula.

Example of a calculation formula for specific rows

In this example, the calculation formula @100+@330 means that the amount in row 100 is added to the amount in row 330. The row total formula 340+370 adds the amount in row 340 to the amount in row 370. (The amount in row 370 is the amount from the calculation formula.)

Row Code Description Format Code Related Formulas/Rows/Unit Print Control Row Modifier Link to Financial Dimensions
340 Cash at Beginning of Period NP BB +Account=[1100:1110]
370 Cash at Beginning of Year CAL @100+@330 NP
400 Cash at Beginning of Period TOT 340+370

When the row in a row definition has a format code of CAL, and you enter a mathematical calculation in the Related Formulas/Rows/Units cell, you must also enter the letter of the associated column and row on the report. For example, enter A.120 to represent column A, row 120. Alternatively, you can use an at sign (@) to indicate all columns. For example, enter @120 to represent all columns in row 120. Any mathematical calculation that doesn't have a column letter or an at sign (@) is assumed to be a real number. Note: If you use a label row code to reference a row, you must use a period (.) as a separator between the column letter and the label (for example, A.GROSS_MARGIN/A.SALES). If you use an at sign (@), a separator isn't required (for example, @GROSS\_MARGIN/@SALES).

Example of a calculation formula for a specific column

In this example, the calculation formula E=C.340 means that the calculation in the cell in column C, row 340, is performed only on column E. Note: When you reference a column in a calculation formula, an at sign (@) isn't required.

Row Code Description Format Code Related Formulas/Rows/Unit Print Control Row Modifier Link to Financial Dimensions
340 Cash at Beginning of Period NP BB +Account=[1100:1110]
370 Cash at Beginning of Year CAL E=C.340 NP
400 Cash at Beginning of Period TOT 340+370

Modifying a number in selected columns

When you modify a number or calculation in one column of a particular row but don't want to affect other columns on the report, you can specify CAL (Calculation) in the Format Code column of the row definition.

  • To perform a calculation on all report (FD) columns, don't enter a column assignment.
  • To restrict a formula to specific columns, enter the column letter, an equal sign (=), and then the formula.
  • You can specify multiple columns. When you use an at sign (@) with specific column placement, the at sign (@) is related to the row.
  • You can enter multiple column formulas in one row. Separate the formulas by using commas.

Calculation examples

Calculation Action that is created
@130*.75 For every column, the value in row 130 is multiplied by 0.75. The result is then put in the current row of every column.
B=@130*.75 The same calculation is performed only on column B.
A,B,C=(@100/@130)*.75 A=(A.100/A.130)*.75 B=(B.100/B.130)*.75 C=(C.100/C.130)*.75

IF/THEN/ELSE statements in a row definition

IF/THEN/ELSE statements can be added to any valid calculation and used with the CAL format. You enter IF/THEN/ELSE calculation formulas in the cell in the Related Formulas/Rows/Units column. IF/THEN/ELSE calculation formulas use the following format: IF <true/false statement> THEN <formula> ELSE <formula> The ELSE <formula> part of the statement is optional.

IF statements

The statement that follows the IF statement can be any statement that can be evaluated as true or false. The statement that follows the IF statement might involve a simple evaluation, or it might be a complex statement that can contain multiple expressions. Here are some examples:

  • IF A.200>0 (Simple evaluation)
  • IF A.200>0 AND A.200<10,000 (Complex statement)
  • IF A.200>10000 OR ((A.340/B.1200)*2 <1200) (Complex statement that contains multiple expressions)

The term Periods in an IF statement represents the number of periods for the report. This term is typically used to calculate a year-to-date average. For example, when you run a report for period 7 YTD, the statement B.150/Periods means that the value in row 150 of column B is divided by 7.

THEN and ELSE formulas

The THEN and ELSE formulas can be any valid calculation, from very simple value assignments to complex formulas. For example, the statement IF A.200>0 THEN A=B.200 means, "If the value in the cell in column A of row 200 is more than 0 (zero), put the value from the cell in column B of row 200 into the cell in column A of the current row." The preceding IF/THEN statement puts a value in one column of the current row. However, you can also use an at sign (@) in either true/false evaluations or the formula to represent all columns. Here are some other examples that are described in the following sections:

  • IF A.200 >0 THEN B.200: If the value in cell A.200 is positive, the value from cell B.200 is put into every column of the current row.
  • IF A.200 >0 THEN @200: If the value in cell A.200 is positive, the value from each column in row 200 is put into the corresponding column in the current row.
  • IF @200 >0 THEN @200: If the value in row 200 of the current column is positive, the value from row 200 is put into the same column in the current row.

Restricting a calculation to a reporting unit in a row definition

To restrict a calculation to a single reporting unit in a reporting tree, so that the resulting amount isn't rolled up to a higher-level unit, you can use the @Unit code in the Related Formulas/Rows/Units cell in the row definition. The @Unit code is listed in column B of the reporting tree, Unit Name. When you use the @Unit code, the values aren't rolled up, but the calculation is evaluated at every level of the reporting tree. Note: To use this function, a reporting tree must be associated with the row definition. The calculation row can refer to a calculation row or a financial data row. The calculation is recorded in the Related Formulas/Rows/Units cell of the row definition and the financial data–type restriction. The calculation must use a conditional calculation that starts with an IF @Unit construction. Here is an example: IF @Unit(SALES) THEN @100 ELSE 0 This calculation includes the amount from row 100 in every column of the report, but only for the SALES unit. If multiple units are named SALES, the amount appears in each of those units. Additionally, row 100 can be a financial data row and can be defined as non-printing. In this case, the amount is prevented from appearing in all units in the tree. You can also limit the amount to a single column of the report, such as column H, by using a column restriction to print the value only in that column of the report. You can include OR combinations in an IF statement. Here is an example: IF @Unit(SALES) OR @Unit(SALESWEST) THEN 5 ELSE @100 You can specify a unit in a calculation-type restriction in one of the following ways:

  • Enter a unit name to include units that match. For example, IF @Unit(SALES) enables the calculation for any unit that is named SALES, even if there are several SALES units in the reporting tree.
  • Enter the company and unit name to restrict the calculation to specific units in a specific company. For example, enter IF @Unit(ACME:SALES) to restrict the calculation to SALES units in the ACME company.
  • Enter the full hierarchy code from the reporting tree to restrict the calculation to a specific unit. For example, enter IF @Unit(SUMMARY^ACME^WEST COAST^SALES). Note: To find the full hierarchy code, right-click in the reporting tree definition, and then select Copy Reporting Unit Identifier (H-code).

Restrict a calculation to a reporting unit

  1. In Report Designer, click Row Definitions, and then open the row definition to modify.
  2. Double-click the Format Code cell, and then select CAL.
  3. Click the Related Formulas/Rows/Units cell, and then enter a conditional calculation that starts with an IF @Unit construction.

IF/THEN/ELSE statements in a column definition

An IF/THEN/ELSE statement enables any calculation to depend on the results from any other column. You can refer to other columns, but you can't refer to a report cell in the IF statement. Any calculation must be applied to the whole column. For example, the statement IF B>100 THEN B ELSE C*1.25 means, "If the amount in column B is more than 100, put the value from column B into the CALC column. If the amount in column B isn't more than 100, multiply the value in column C by 1.25, and put the result into the CALC column." Always follow the IF statement with a logic statement that can be evaluated as true or false. The formulas that you use for both the THEN statement and the ELSE statement can contain references to any number of columns, and these formulas can be as complex as you want to make them. Note: You can't put the results of a calculation into any other column. The results must be in the column that contains the formula.