Remove-Job

Deletes a PowerShell background job.

Syntax

Remove-Job
      [-Id] <Int32[]>
      [-Force]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Remove-Job
      [-Job] <Job[]>
      [-Force]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Remove-Job
      [-Name] <String[]>
      [-Force]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Remove-Job
      [-InstanceId] <Guid[]>
      [-Force]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Remove-Job
      [-Filter] <Hashtable>
      [-Force]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Remove-Job
      [-State] <JobState>
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]
Remove-Job
      [-Command <String[]>]
      [-WhatIf]
      [-Confirm]
      [<CommonParameters>]

Description

The Remove-Job cmdlet deletes PowerShell background jobs that were started by the Start-Job cmdlet or by cmdlets such as Invoke-Command that support the AsJob parameter.

You can use Remove-Job to delete all jobs or delete selected jobs. The jobs are identified by their Name, ID, Instance ID, Command, or State. Or, a job object can be sent down the pipeline to Remove-Job. Without parameters or parameter values, Remove-Job has no effect.

Since PowerShell 3.0, Remove-Job can delete custom job types, such as scheduled jobs and workflow jobs. For example, Remove-Job deletes the scheduled job, all instances of the scheduled job on disk, and the results of all triggered job instances.

If you try to delete a running job, Remove-Job fails. Use the Stop-Job cmdlet to stop a running job. Or, use Remove-Job with the Force parameter to delete a running job.

Jobs remain in the global job cache until you delete the background job or close the PowerShell session.

Examples

Example 1: Delete a job by using its name

This example uses a variable and the pipeline to delete a job by name.

$batch = Get-Job -Name BatchJob
$batch | Remove-Job

Get-Job uses the Name parameter to specify the job, BatchJob. The job object is stored in the $batch variable. The object in $batch is sent down the pipeline to Remove-Job.

An alternative is to use the Job parameter, such as Remove-Job -Job $batch.

Example 2: Delete all jobs in a session

In this example, all the jobs in the current PowerShell session are deleted.

Get-job | Remove-Job

Get-Job gets all the jobs in the current PowerShell session. The job objects are sent down the pipeline to Remove-Job.

Example 3: Delete NotStarted jobs

This example deletes all jobs from the current PowerShell session that haven't started.

Remove-Job -State NotStarted

Remove-Job uses the State parameter to specify the job status.

Example 4: Delete jobs by using a friendly name

This example deletes all jobs from the current session with friendly names that end with batch*, including jobs that are running.

Remove-Job -Name *batch -Force

Remove-Job uses the Name parameter to specify a job name pattern. The pattern includes the asterisk (*) wildcard to find all job names that end with batch. The Force parameter deletes jobs that running.

Example 5: Delete a job that was created by Invoke-Command

This example removes a job that was started on a remote computer using Invoke-Command with the AsJob parameter.

Because the example uses the AsJob parameter, the job object is created on the local computer. But, the job runs on a remote computer. As a result, you use local commands to manage the job.

$job = Invoke-Command -ComputerName Server01 -ScriptBlock {Get-Process} -AsJob
$job | Remove-Job

Invoke-Command runs a job on the Server01 computer. The AsJob parameter runs the ScriptBlock as a background job. The job object is stored in the $job variable. The $job variable object is sent down the pipeline to Remove-Job.

Example 6: Delete a job that was created by Invoke-Command and Start-Job

This example shows how to remove a job on a remote computer that was started by using Invoke-Command to run Start-Job. The job object is created on the remote computer and remote commands are used to manage the job. A persistent connection is required when running a remote Start-Job command.

$S = New-PSSession -ComputerName Server01
Invoke-Command -Session $S -ScriptBlock {Start-Job -ScriptBlock {Get-Process} -Name MyJob}
Invoke-Command -Session $S -ScriptBlock {Remove-Job -Name MyJob}

New-PSSession creates a PSSession, a persistent connection, to the Server01 computer. The connection is saved in the $S variable.

Invoke-Command connects to the session saved in $S. The ScriptBlock uses Start-Job to start a remote job. The job runs a Get-Process command and uses the Name parameter to specify a friendly job name, MyJob.

Invoke-Command uses the $S session and runs Remove-Job. The Name parameter specifies that the job named MyJob is deleted.

Example 7: Delete a job by using its InstanceId

This example removes a job based on its InstanceId.

$job = Start-Job -ScriptBlock {Get-Process PowerShell}
$job | Format-List -Property *
Remove-Job -InstanceId ad02b942-8007-4407-87f3-d23e71955872

State         : Completed
HasMoreData   : True
StatusMessage :
Location      : localhost
Command       : Get-Process PowerShell
JobStateInfo  : Completed
Finished      : System.Threading.ManualResetEvent
InstanceId    : ad02b942-8007-4407-87f3-d23e71955872
Id            : 3
Name          : Job3
ChildJobs     : {Job4}
PSBeginTime   : 7/26/2019 11:36:56
PSEndTime     : 7/26/2019 11:36:57
PSJobTypeName : BackgroundJob
Output        : {}
Error         : {}
Progress      : {}
Verbose       : {}
Debug         : {}
Warning       : {}
Information   : {}

Start-Job starts a background job and the job object is saved in the $job variable.

The object in $job is sent down the pipeline to Format-List. The Property parameter uses an asterisk (*) to specify that all the object's properties are displayed in a list.

Remove-Job uses the InstanceId parameter to specify the job to delete.

Parameters

-Command

Deletes jobs that include the specified words in the command. You can enter a comma-separated array.

Type:String[]
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Confirm

Prompts you for confirmation before Remove-Job is run.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:cf
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Filter

Deletes jobs that satisfy all the conditions established in the associated hash table. Enter a hash table where the keys are job properties and the values are job property values.

This parameter works only on custom job types, such as workflow jobs and scheduled jobs. It doesn't work on standard background jobs, such as those created by using the Start-Job.

This parameter is introduced in PowerShell 3.0.

Type:Hashtable
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Force

Deletes a job even if the job's state is Running. If the Force parameter isn't specified, Remove-Job doesn't delete running jobs.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:F
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Id

Deletes background jobs with the specified Id. You can enter a comma-separated array. The job's Id is a unique integer that identifies a job within the current session.

To find a job's Id, use Get-Job without parameters.

Type:Int32[]
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-InstanceId

Deletes jobs with the specified InstanceId. You can enter a comma-separated array. An InstanceId is a unique GUID that identifies a job.

To find a job's InstanceId, use Get-Job.

Type:Guid[]
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Job

Specifies the jobs to be deleted. Enter a variable that contains the jobs or a command that gets the jobs. You can enter a comma-separated array.

You can send job objects down the pipeline to Remove-Job.

Type:Job[]
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName, ByValue)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Name

Only deletes jobs with the specified friendly name. Wildcards are permitted. You can enter a comma-separated array.

Friendly names for jobs aren't guaranteed to be unique, even within a PowerShell session. Use the WhatIf and Confirm parameters when you delete files by name.

Type:String[]
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters:True
-State

Only deletes jobs with the specified state. To delete jobs with a state of Running, use the Force parameter.

Accepted values:

  • AtBreakpoint
  • Blocked
  • Completed
  • Disconnected
  • Failed
  • NotStarted
  • Running
  • Stopped
  • Stopping
  • Suspended
  • Suspending
Type:JobState
Accepted values:AtBreakpoint, Blocked, Completed, Disconnected, Failed, NotStarted, Running, Stopped, Stopping, Suspended, Suspending
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-WhatIf

Shows what would happen if Remove-Job runs. The cmdlet isn't run.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:wi
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

Inputs

System.Management.Automation.Job

You can send a job object down the pipeline to Remove-Job.

Outputs

None

Remove-Job doesn't generate any output.

Notes

A PowerShell job creates a new process. When the job completes, the process exits. When Remove-Job is run, the job's state is removed.

If a job stops before completion and its process hasn't exited, the process is forcibly terminated.