Customizing and Automating Installations

The System Preparation tool, Sysprep.exe, is an imaging method that you can use to install identical configurations on multiple computers. You can also use Sysprep to customize and automate Mini-Setup and to audit computers. There is no limit to the number of times that you can use Sysprep.

On a master computer, install Windows 2000 Professional and any applications that you want installed on your destination computers. Then run Sysprep to transfer the image to the other computers. Sysprep prepares the hard disk on the master computer for duplication to other computers and then runs a third-party disk-imaging process. The major advantage of Sysprep installation is speed. The image can be packaged and compressed; only the files required for the specific configuration are created as part of the image.

To use Sysprep, your master and destination computers must have identical HALs and Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) support. Windows 2000 Professional automatically detects Plug and Play devices, and Sysprep redetects and reenumerates the devices on the system when the computer is turned on after Sysprep has run. This means that Plug and Play devices, such as network adapters, modems, video adapters, and sound cards, do not have to be the same on the master and destination computers. Additional Plug and Play drivers that you might require on other systems are also created. The image can also be copied to a CD and distributed to remote sites that have slow links.

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Important

When performing disk duplication, check with your software vendor to make sure that you are not violating the licensing agreement for installation of the software that you want to duplicate.

Overview of the Sysprep Process

The following steps describe the process of preparing a master computer to use for disk duplication.

  1. Install Windows 2000 Professional on a computer that has hardware similar to the destination computers. While preparing the computer, do not join it to a domain, and keep the local administrative password blank.

  2. Configure the computer. Log on as the administrator, and then install and customize Windows 2000 Professional and associated applications. These might include productivity applications, such as Microsoft Office, business-specific applications, and other applications or settings that you want included in a common configuration for all clients.

  3. Validate the image. Run an audit, based on your criteria, to verify that the image configuration is correct. Remove residual information, including anything left behind from audit and event logs.

  4. Prepare the image for duplication. When you are confident that the computer is configured exactly as you want, you are ready to prepare the system for duplication. You accomplish this by running Sysprep with the optional Sysprep.inf file, described later in this chapter. When Sysprep has been run, the computer shuts down automatically or indicates that it is safe to shut down.

  5. Duplicate. The computer hard disk is triggered to run Plug and Play detection, create new security identifiers (SIDs), and run the Mini-Setup wizard the next time the system is started. You can duplicate or create an image of the system by using hardware or software. The next time Windows 2000 Professional is started from this master computer or from any destination computer created from this image, the system detects and reenumerates the Plug and Play devices to complete the installation and configuration on the destination computer.
    important-icon
    Important
    Components that depend on the Active Directory directory service cannot be duplicated.

When Hardware Configurations Differ

While the System Preparation tool is especially useful in streamlining the deployment process for large organizations whose desktops and servers have identical hardware configurations, it can also be used for deploying Windows 2000 in heterogeneous computing environments. The only requirement is that the configurations of destination machines are compatible with the copied image. Since Windows 2000 Professional supports hardware detection and Plug and Play, computers with different modems, display adapters, and other hardware devices that are not critical during startup should pose no difficulty. Once the operating system files are copied to the destination machine, Plug and Play runs through the process of detecting and installing whatever hardware devices are on the destination system.

Duplicating onto Computers with Different Mass Storage Controllers

Where hardware devices are critical during startup, they must be compatible with the configuration of the copied image. To help address this issue, the latest version of Sysprep (version 1.1) has an important enhancement that gives administrators the ability to create one master image that they can install onto destination computers with different mass storage controllers. This helps reduce the number of images they need to maintain for their various configurations.

If the mass storage controllers on the destination computers are not identical to those on the master computer, the administrator must identify the different mass storage controllers that may be installed on each destination computer in a list in the Sysprep.inf file before creating the master image. This allows Sysprep to pre-populate the necessary driver information so that Windows 2000 can load the correct drivers when it boots on a computer that has one of the predefined mass storage controllers. This method is ideal for the following situations:

IDE to IDE. The master image is created on a computer that uses a different IDE controller than the destination computers. For example, the master computer uses a PCI IDE controller; the destination computers use an Intel IDE controller.

IDE to SCSI. The master image is created on a computer that uses an IDE controller, and the destination computers use a SCSI controller. For example, the master computer uses a PCI IDE controller; some of the destination computers start from a SCSI controller such as an Adaptec 7800.

SCSI to SCSI. The master image is created on a computer that uses a different SCSI controller than the destination computers. For example, the master computer uses an Adaptec 7800 controller; the destination computers use a Qlogic controller.

SCSI to IDE. The master image is created on a computer that uses a SCSI controller, and the destination computers use IDEW controllers. For example, the master computer uses an Adaptec 7800 controller; some of the destination computers start from an IDE controller.

Sysprep Files

Run Sysprep.exe manually or configure Setup to run Sysprep.exe automatically by using the [GuiRunOnce] section of the answer file. The files Sysprep.exe and Setupcl.exe must be located in a Sysprep folder at the root of the system drive (% SystemDrive %\Sysprep\). To place the files in the correct location during an automated Setup, add these files to your distribution folders under the $OEM$\$1\Sysprep subfolder. For more information about this subfolder, see Create a Distribution Folder earlier in this chapter.

These files prepare the operating system for duplication and start the Mini-Setup wizard. You can also include an optional answer file, Sysprep.inf, in the Sysprep folder. Sysprep.inf contains default parameters that you can use to provide consistent responses where they are appropriate. This limits the requirement for user input, and reduces potential user errors. You can also place the Sysprep.inf file on a floppy disk to insert after the Windows startup screen appears to allow further customization at the location of the destination computer. The floppy disk drive is read when the Please Wait Mini-Setup wizard screen appears. When the Mini-Setup wizard has successfully completed its tasks, the system restarts a final time, the Sysprep folder and all of its contents are deleted, and the system is ready for the user to log on.

The Sysprep files are defined in the following sections.

Sysprep.exe

Sysprep.exe has the following optional parameters:

  • quiet . Runs Sysprep without displaying on-screen messages. This is useful for the administrator who wants to automate Sysprep by adding it to the [GuiRunOnce] key of the Unattend.txt file.

  • nosidgen . Runs Sysprep without regenerating SIDs that are already on the system. This is useful if you do not intend to duplicate the computer on which you are running Sysprep, or if you intend to preinstall domain controllers.

  • /pnp . Forces full hardware detection on reboot. The system actively seeks new devices on the system, whether or not they are Plug and Play. Since this mode increases the time required for MiniSetup, it is only useful if the computer on which the image is being loaded has non-Plug and Play hardware that cannot be dynamically detected.

  • reboot . Automatically restarts the computer after Sysprep shuts it down. This eliminates the need to manually turn on the computer again.

Sysprep.inf

Sysprep.inf is an answer file that is used to automate the Mini-Setup process. It uses the same INI file syntax and key names (for supported keys) as the Setup answer file. Place the Sysprep.inf file in the % SystemDrive %\Sysprep folder or on a floppy disk. If you use a floppy disk, insert it into the floppy disk drive after the Windows startup screen appears. Note that if you do not include Sysprep.inf when running Sysprep, the Mini-Setup wizard requires user input at each customization screen.

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Note

If you provided a Sysprep.inf file on the master computer and want to individually change Sysprep.inf on each destination computer, use the floppy disk method.

Following is an example of a Sysprep.inf file:

[Unattended]

;Prompt the user to accept the EULA.

OemSkipEula=No

;Use Sysprep's default and regenerate the page file for the system

;to accommodate potential differences in available RAM.

KeepPageFile=0

;Provide the location for additional language support files that

;might be required in a global organization.

InstallFilesPath=%systemdrive%\Sysprep\i386

[GuiUnattended]

;Specify a non-null administrator password.

;Any password supplied here only takes effect if the original source

;for the image (master computer) specified a non-null password.

;Otherwise, the password used on the master computer is

;the password used on this computer. This can only be changed by

;logging on as local administrator and manually changing the password.

AdminPassword=

;Set the time zone

TimeZone=20

;Skip the Welcome screen when the system boots.

OemSkipWelcome=1

;Do not skip the regional options dialog box so that the user can indicate

;which regional options apply to them.

OemSkipRegional=0

[UserData]

;Prepopulate user information for the system

FullName=Authorized User

OrgName=Organization Name

ComputerName=XYZ_Computer1

[Identification]

;Join the computer to the domain ITDOMAIN

JoinDomain=ITDOMAIN

[Networking]

;Bind the default protocols and services to the (s) network adapter used.

;in this computer.

InstallDefaultComponents=Yes

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Note

You can change the administrative password using Sysprep.inf only if the existing administrative password is null. This is also true if you want to change the administrator password by using the Sysprep GUI.

For more information about answer file parameters and syntax, see Unattend.doc in Support\Tools\Deploy.cab on the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD. In Windows 98, Windows NT, or Windows 2000 Professional, use Windows Explorer to extract this document. In Windows 95 and earlier, or in MS-DOS, use the Extract command to access the file.

Setupcl.exe

Setupcl.exe does the following:

  • Regenerates new SIDs for the computer

  • Starts the Mini-Setup wizard

Mini-Setup Wizard

The Mini-Setup wizard starts the first time that a computer starts from a disk that has been duplicated when using Sysprep. The wizard gathers information that is required to further customize the destination computer. If you do not use Sysprep.inf, or if you leave some sections of the file blank, the Mini-Setup wizard displays screens for which no answer was provided. The possible screens include the following:

  • Welcome to Windows 2000 Professional Setup wizard (always shown)

  • EULA (always shown)

  • Regional options (can be hidden)

  • User name and company (can be hidden)

  • Product key (always shown unless you prepopulate this information for the user)

  • Computer name and administrator password (can be hidden)

  • TAPI settings (displayed only if a modem or a new modem device exists on the computer)

  • Date and time settings (can be hidden)

  • Networking settings (can be hidden)

  • Workgroup or computer domain

Optional information appears unless you prepopulate answers for the end user by using the Sysprep.inf file. For more information about the Sysprep.inf file, see Unattend.doc in Support\Tools\Deploy.cab on the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD.

To bypass these screens, specify certain parameters within Sysprep.inf. These parameters are listed in Table 5.16.

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Note

Because Setup detects optimal settings for display devices, you no longer see the Display Settings screen when Setup or the Mini-Setup wizard are running. You can specify the settings in the [Display] section either in the answer file that is used for your master computer or in the Sysprep.inf file used for your destination computer. If settings in the [Display] section are in the answer file that is used for your master computer, Sysprep retains those settings unless Sysprep.inf contains different settings or unless a video adapter or monitor is detected that requires settings different from those of the master computer.

Table 5.16 Parameters in Sysprep.inf for Bypassing the Mini-Setup Wizard

Parameter

Section

Regional options

[RegionalSettings]

– Or –

[GuiUnattended]

OemSkipRegional=1

User name and company

[UserData]

FullName=User Name

OrgName=Organization Name

Computer name and administrator password

[UserData]

ComputerName=W2B32054

[GuiUnattended]

AdminPassword=

TAPI settings

[TapiLocation]

AreaCode=425

Network settings

[Networking]

Server licensing (server only)

[LicenseFilePrintData]

AutoMode = PerServer

AutoUsers = 5

Time zone selection

[GuiUnattended]

TimeZone=<desired time zone index>

Running Sysprep.exe

You can run Sysprep manually or automatically. This section lists the requirements for running Sysprep and procedures for running it manually or automatically.

Requirements to Run Sysprep

To use Sysprep, the following requirements must be met:

  • The master and destination computers must have compatible, if not identical, HALs. For example, HAL Advanced Processor Interrupt Controller (APIC) and HAL MPs (multiprocessor systems) are compatible, whereas HAL PIC (Programmable Interrupt Controller) is not compatible with either HAL APIC or HAL MPs.

  • The mass storage controllers (IDE or SCSI) must either be identical between the master and destination computers, or the administrator must identify the different mass storage controllers that may be installed on each destination computer in a list in the Sysprep.inf file before creating the master image.

  • Plug and Play devices such as modems, sound cards, network adapters, and video cards do not have to be the same, but drivers for those devices should be available.

  • Third-party software or disk-duplicating hardware devices are required. These products create binary images of a computer's hard disk and either duplicate the image to another hard disk or store the image in a file on a separate disk.

  • The size of the hard disk on the destination computer must be at least the same size as the hard disk on the master computer. If the destination computer has a larger hard disk, the difference is not included in the primary partition. However, you can use the ExtendOemPartition key in the Sysprep.inf file to extend the primary partition if it was formatted as NTFS.

Running Sysprep

After you install Windows 2000 Professional, you can use Sysprep to prepare the system for transfer to other similarly configured computers. To run Sysprep manually, first install Windows 2000 Professional, configure the system, and install the applications. Then run Sysprep without the reboot command-line ** switch. After the system shuts down, duplicate the image of the drive to the similarly configured computers.

When users start up their duplicated computers for the first time, the Mini-Setup wizard runs, allowing the users to customize their systems. You can also preassign all or some of the Sysprep configuration parameters by using Sysprep.inf. The Sysprep folder (which contains Sysprep.exe and Setupcl.exe) is automatically deleted after Mini-Setup is completed.

To prepare a Windows 2000 Professional installation for duplication

  1. From the Start menu, click Run , and then type:
    cmd

  2. At the command prompt, change to the root folder of drive C, and then type:
    md sysprep

  3. Insert the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD into the appropriate CD-ROM drive. Open the Deploy.cab file in the folder Support\Tools.

  4. Copy Sysprep.exe and Setupcl.exe to the Sysprep folder.
    If you are using Sysprep.inf, copy this file to the Sysprep folder. Sysprep.exe, Setupcl.exe, and Sysprep.inf must be in the same folder for Sysprep to function properly.

  5. At the command prompt, change to the Sysprep folder by typing:
    cd sysprep

  6. At the command prompt, type one of the following, as required:
    **sysprep/**optional_parameter

  7. If the *–*reboot command-line switch was not specified, perform the following:
    When a message requesting that you shut down the computer appears, from the Start menu, click Shut Down . You are now ready to use a third-party disk-imaging tool to create an image of the installation.

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Note

You can add a Cmdlines.txt file to the Sysprep folder, to be processed by Setup. This file is used to run post-setup commands, including commands for application installation.

Using Sysprep with Nonnetworked Computers

Even if you don't have a network, you can still install Windows 2000 Professional and various applications on destination computers, one computer at a time.

To install Windows 2000 Professional on nonnetworked computers

  1. Choose a setup method, and then start Setup.

  2. Add custom information and additional files.

  3. Install applications. If you have no applications to install, skip this step.
    important-icon
    Important
    Each destination computer must have a CD-ROM drive.

Step 1: Choose a Setup Method and Then Start Setup

Setup can typically be started from an MS-DOS bootable floppy disk, from the Windows 2000 Professional Setup floppy disks, from the hard disk of the destination computer (if it has an operating system installed), or from the CD-ROM drive. CD Boot is available only with computers that support starting from the CD-ROM drive by using the El Torito No Emulation Mode CD Boot specification. Choose from the methods provided later in this section.

To install from the Setup floppy disks

  1. Start the computer using the Windows 2000 Professional Setup floppy disks.

  2. When Setup is complete, you're ready to add applications and run Sysprep.
    For more information about how to install applications, see Step 3: Customize earlier in this chapter.

To install from MS-DOS or Windows 3.x

  1. Make sure that the drivers required for the CD-ROM drive are available on the disk or the drive and that they are loaded correctly.

  2. Start the computer.

  3. Change to the distribution folder and, at the command prompt, type:
    winnt /s:install_source /u:Unattend.txt
    where:
    install_source is the location of the Windows 2000 Professional files.
    Unattend.txt is the answer file, which contains answers to installation questions that you want to automate.
    For more information about Unattend.txt, see Unattend.doc in Support\Tools\Deploy.cab on the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD.

  4. When Setup is complete, you can add applications and run Sysprep.
    For more information about how to install applications, see Step 3: Customize earlier in this chapter.

To install from Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT Workstation 4.0

  1. Start the computer.

  2. From the Start menu, click Run , and then type:
    < path to distribution folder > winnt32 /unattend:Unattend.txt
    where:

    • Unattend.txt is the answer file, which contains answers to installation questions that you want to automate.
  3. When Setup is complete, you're ready to add applications and run Sysprep to prepare for creating an image.

For instructions about how to install applications, see Step 3: Customize earlier in this chapter.

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Note

To ensure a clean installation, make sure that you do not install Windows 2000 Professional as an upgrade.

Before you use CD Boot, make sure that the following conditions are met:

  • Your computer has El Torito No Emulation CD Boot support.

  • The answer file is called Winnt.sif and is located on a floppy disk.

  • The answer file contains a [Data] section with the required keys.
    note-icon
    Note
    The /udf switch cannot be used with the CD Boot method.

To install by using CD Boot

  1. Start the computer from the Windows 2000 Professional operating system CD. Setup begins automatically.

  2. When Setup displays the message that it is examining the hardware configuration, insert the floppy disk containing the Winnt.sif file.

  3. When the floppy drive light goes off, remove the floppy disk. Setup begins copying files to the hard disk.
    For more information about how to install applications, see Step 3: Customize ealier in this chapter.

Step 2: Add Customized Information and Components

During this step, you can add customized information (such as your company's name) and components (such as custom help files and documentation).

To add customized information and components

  • Create a file called Oeminfo.ini and copy it to the %systemroot%\System32 folder. The SystemRoot folder is usually C:\Winnt.

Step 3: Install Applications

After Windows 2000 Professional installation is complete, install any applications that you want to include with the computer. If you don't have any applications to install, you can skip this step.

To install applications

  1. After the computer restarts, log on to Windows 2000 Professional as an administrator, leaving the password field blank.

  2. Install any applications that your user has requested.

Using Sysprep to Extend Disk Partitions

When installing Windows 2000 Professional, you might find it necessary to extend the partition of the destination computer. You can use Sysprep with the appropriate entries in the answer file to extend an NTFS partition. You might want to do this to do the following:

  • Create images that can be extended into larger disk partitions to take full advantage of hard disks that might have more space than the original hard disk on the master computer.

  • Create images on smaller hard disks.

Review the steps that follow and choose the method that works best for you based on the tools that you are using to create an image of the operating system.

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Caution

Make sure that you do not accidentally delete the files Pagefile.sys, Setupapi.log, and Hyberfil.sys (if applicable) when modifying the image. These files are recreated when the Mini-Setup wizard runs on the destination computer. Deleting these files on an active system can cause the system to function improperly.

When used in an answer file, the ExtendOemPartition key causes Setup to extend the destination partition into any available unpartitioned space that physically follows it on the disk.

The values for ExtendOemPartition are 0, 1, and < extra size in MB >

where:

  • 0 Setup does not extend the partition.

  • 1 Setup extends the partition to fill out the hard disk.

  • < extra size in MB > Setup increases the current partition size by this amount.

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Note

ExtendOemPartition automatically leaves the last cylinder on the hard disk free to allow dynamic disk support.

ExtendOemPartition can be set to a number other than 1 to indicate a specific disk size for extending the hard disk in addition to the current space used. This is useful if more than one partition is requested on a computer.

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Important

Only NTFS partitions can be extended. If the destination partition you plan to extend is FAT or FAT32, set FileSystem = ConvertNTFS in the answer file to convert the partition. Setup does not extend FAT16 and FAT32 partitions.

ExtendOemPartition can be used with both the Unattend.txt and Sysprep.inf Setup files.

When used in Sysprep.inf for imaged computers, the destination computer's hard disk must be the same size or larger than the master computer's hard disk.

The partition to be extended must have available, unpartitioned space following it to allow the extension.

To extend a hard disk partition when using a third-party imaging product or a hardware imaging device that supports NTFS used by Windows 2000 Professional

  1. Create a partition on the master computer hard disk that is just large enough to install Windows 2000 Professional with all the components and applications that you intend to add. This helps keep the size of the master image file to a minimum.

  2. Include FileSystem=ConvertNTFS in the [Unattended] section of the answer file that creates the master image. You do not need to include ExtendOemPartition because you want to maintain the smallest possible image size.
    note-icon
    Note
    ConvertNTFS does not work in Sysprep.inf because this is a text mode–only function and Sysprep does not go through text mode.

  3. In the [Unattended] section of Sysprep.inf, include the statement:

ExtendOemPartition = 1

Or additional size in megabytes to extend the partition.

  1. Install Windows 2000 Professional on the master computer. Sysprep shuts down the system automatically.

  2. Generate the image.

  3. Place the image on the destination computer where the destination computer has the same size system partition as the master computer.

  4. Restart the destination computer.
    When you place the master image on a destination computer, drive C is converted when the computer is turned on. The computer then restarts and starts Mini-Setup. During Mini-Setup, Windows extends drive C to the rest of the unpartitioned space on the hard disk in an almost instantaneous process. The destination computer then restarts again, and the end user can log on and begin using Windows 2000 Professional.
    The Mini-Setup wizard starts and the partition is extended.

To extend a hard disk partition when using an imaging product that does not support NTFS used by Windows 2000 Professional

  1. In the [Unattended] section of Sysprep.inf, include the statement:

ExtendOemPartition = 1

Or additional size in megabytes to extend the partition.

  1. Convert short file names using Cmdlines.txt

  2. Run Sysprep.

The following occurs when you restart the destination computer:

  • The computer initially starts in conversion mode to convert the system partition on the destination computer to NTFS.

  • The computer automatically restarts.

  • The Mini-Setup wizard starts, and the partition is extended almost instantaneously.

Reducing the Number of Master Images

With Sysprep you can minimize the number of images you need to use for preinstalling Windows 2000 Professional from multi-processor (MP) to uni-processor (UP) computers or from UP to MP computers. However, this onlys work for APIC or ACPI APIC computers.

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Note

More interrupts are available with APIC systems than with Processor Interrupt Controller (PIC) uni-processor systems. As a result, your computers:

  • Will have faster response times.

  • Will be able to support more hardware devices than PIC HALs.

There are two methods for creating images that you can use between MP and UP systems. Each method has advantages and disadvantages associated with it, as outline in the following sections. Choose the method that works best for you and your preinstallation environment.

Table 5.17 illustrates the compatibility of computers based on their HAL type. One image is required for each compatibility group.

Table 5.17 HAL Compatibility

Compatibility

ACPI PIC

ACPI APIC UP

ACPI APIC MP

Non-ACPI UP PIC

Non-ACPI APIC UP

Non-ACPI APIC MP

ACPI PIC

x

 

 

 

 

 

ACPI APIC UP

 

x

x

 

 

 

ACPI APIC MP

 

x

x

 

 

 

Non-ACPI APIC UP

 

 

 

 

x

x

Non-ACPI UP PIC

 

 

 

x

 

 

Non-ACPI APIC MP

 

 

 

 

x

x

Multiprocessor to Uniprocessor

For this process, the image is created on an multiprocessor master computer. This image can be used on other multiprocessor computers or on uniprocessor computers.

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Important

This image can only be used in one of the following configurations depending on the HAL type you are using:

  • From an ACPI APIC MP-based master computer for use on other ACPI APIC MP or ACPI APIC UP-based computers.

  • From a non-ACPI APIC MP-based master computer for use on other non-ACPI APIC MP or non-ACPI APIC UP-based computers.

To create an multiprocessor to uniprocessor image

  1. Copy the Mp2up.inf and associated Mp2up files to the location you are using for your Plug and Play device drivers in your distribution folders, for example, \$OEM$\$1\Sysprep\Hal.
    note-icon
    Note
    For System Builders, the necessary Mp2up files can be downloaded from the Microsoft OEM System Builder Web site link on the Web Resources page at http://windows.microsoft.com/windows2000/reskit/webresources .

  2. In Sysprep.inf, add:

[Unattended]

UpdateUPHAL = hwid,%systemdrive%\Sysprep\Hal\Mp2up.inf

where:

  • hwid is either MPS_UP or ACPI APIC_UP.
  1. Install Windows 2000 Professional from the distribution folders to an multiprocessor computer.

  2. Run Sysprep with the Sysprep.inf created in step 2.

  3. Image the computer.

  4. Place the image on comparable destination computers.

Advantage    You can create a single entry in the Sysprep.inf which then prompts Windows 2000 Professional to determine, after Mini-Setup is complete, if a single processor or if multiple processors are running and to then use the correct kernel files.

Disadvantage    This process requires that, when you create the master image, you include each of the Mp2up.inf files and other related Mp2up files in the distribution folders.

Uniprocessor to Multiprocessor

For this process, the image is created on a uniprocessor master computer with an APIC HAL. This image can then be used on computers with compatible hardware, including the HAL, to be used between either APIC UP HALs or APIC MP HALs.

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Important

This image can only be used in one of the following configurations depending on the HAL type you are using:

  • From an ACPI APIC UP-based master computer for use on other ACPI APIC UP or ACPI APIC MP-based computers.

  • From a non-ACPI APIC UP-based master computer for use on other non-ACPI APIC UP or non-ACPI APIC MP-based computers.

To create the uniprocessor to multiprocessor image

  1. Install Windows 2000 Professional on a uniprocessor computer.

  2. Run Sysprep.

  3. Create the image of the computer.

  4. In Sysprep.inf, add:

[Unattended]

UpdateHAL = hwid,%windir%\inf\hal.inf

where:

  • hwid is either MPS_MP or ACPI APIC_MP.
  1. Place the image on comparable destination computers.

  2. On multiprocessory computers, use the Sysprep.inf file created in step 4 to replace all previous Sysprep.inf files.
    You can use any tools you normally use to manipulate files on the hard disk when creating new computers from an image.

Advantage    You do not have to install the Mp2up files on the computer.

Disadvantage    Before the computers can be shipped, the Sysprep.inf file must be replaced depending on the type of computer being shipped: uniprocessor or multiprocessor.