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Important

This release is not "go-live" and not intended for use on production computers or for creating production code. For instructions on installing and updating Visual Studio 2019, see this documentation on updating Visual Studio 2019 to the most recent release.

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What's New in Visual Studio 2019

Support Timeframe

Visual Studio 2019 version 16.9 will be the fourth supported servicing baseline for Visual Studio 2019. Enterprise and Professional customers needing to adopt a long term stable and secure development environment are encouraged to standardize on this version.  As explained in more detail in our lifecycle and support policy, version 16.9 will be supported with fixes and security updates for one year after the release of the next servicing baseline.

Additionally, once version 16.9 is released, version 16.7, which was the most recent servicing baseline, will be supported for an additional 12 months and will go out of support in early 2022, a year after 16.9 ships. Once version 16.9 ships, versions 16.8 will no longer be under support.

For more information about Visual Studio supported baselines, please review the support policy for Visual Studio 2019.

Visual Studio 2019 Preview Releases

Visual Studio 2019 Blog

The Visual Studio 2019 Blog is the official source of product insight from the Visual Studio Engineering Team. You can find in-depth information about the Visual Studio 2019 releases in the following posts:


Release Notes Icon Visual Studio 2019 version 16.9 Preview 1 New release icon

released November 10, 2020

Summary of What's New in this Release of Visual Studio 2019 version 16.9 Preview 1

Git Productivity

  • Push all tags from the Git Changes window

.NET Productivity

  • A refactoring that suggests using new(…) in non-contentious scenarios
  • A code fix that removes redundant equality expressions for both C# and Visual Basic
  • The .NET Code Style (IDE) analyzers can now be enforced on build
  • The Syntax Visualizer shows the current foreground color for enhanced colors
  • A new tooltip when hovering over the diagnostic ID for pragma warnings
  • When you type the return key from within a comment the new line is now automatically commented out
  • Inline parameter name hints enhancements

C++

  • Implementation of the More Constexpr Containers proposal, which allows destructors and new expressions to be constexpr. This paves the way for utilities like constexpr std::vector and std::string.
  • Extended support for C++20 modules IntelliSense, including Go To Definition, Go To Module, and member completion.

Debugger

  • Added a new Auto Analyzer that inspects the .NET Core Finalizer queue and detects potentially blocking objects.

.NET

  • .NET Core Debugging with WSL 2

Experimental Razor Editor Updates

  • HTML and C# semantic colorization
  • Renames of C# symbols reflected in closed Razor files
  • More C# light bulbs in Razor files
  • Further improvements to mixed content formatting in Razor files

Issues Addressed in this Release

Details of What's New in Visual Studio 2019 version 16.9 Preview 1

Git Productivity

  • Push all tags from the Git Changes window.
Push all Tags
Push all tags to your remote

.NET Productivity

  • There is now a refactoring that suggests using new(…) in non-contentious scenarios. Place your cursor on the field declaration. Press (Ctrl+.) to trigger the Quick Actions and Refactorings menu. Select Use ‘new(…)’.
Use new(...) refactoring
Use new(...) refactoring
  • There is now a code fix that removes redundant equality expressions for both C# and Visual Basic. Place your cursor on the redundant equality expression. Press (Ctrl+.) to trigger the Quick Actions and Refactorings menu. Select Remove redundant equality.
Remove redundant equality expressions code fix
Remove redundant equality expressions code fix
  • The .NET Code Style (IDE) analyzers can now be enforced on build. You can either install the .NET Code Style analyzers as a NuGet package for C# and Visual Basic or you can enable them in Project Properties. To access the Project Properties right-click on a project within Solution Explorer and select Properties. Next, select the Code Analysis tab where you can select Enforce CodeStyle on build (experimental).
Project Properties window to enable .NET Code Style Analyzers
Project Properties window to enable .NET Code Style Analyzers
  • The Syntax Visualizer (installed with the .NET Compiler Platform SDK) now shows the current foreground color for enhanced colors. Simply use the visualizer to navigate to the text you want to change colors for, or select in the editor, and then click on the classified color to change it.
Syntax Visualizer Colorization
Syntax Visualizer Colorization
  • There is now a tooltip when hovering over the diagnostic ID for pragma warnings. The diagnostic tooltip also has a clickable link that navigates to the documentation.
Diagnostic Tooltip for Pragma Warnings
Diagnostic Tooltip for Pragma Warnings
  • When you type the return key from within a comment you may notice that the new line is now automatically commented out. This is a new option that is on by default. To prevent the new line from automatically being commented out, go to Tools > Options > Text Editor > C# or Basic > Advanced and uncheck Insert // at the start of new lines when writing // comments.

In 16.8 Preview 2 we added inline parameter name hints that inserts adornments for literals, casted literals, and object instantiations prior to each argument in function calls. In this release we added the following enhancements:

  • More customization options for the types of adornments you would like inserted.
  • Inline type hints for variables with inferred types and lambda parameter types.
  • An option to disable inline parameter name hints when parameter names match the method’s intent and when parameter names differ only by suffix.

XAML Tools (WPF, UWP & Xamarin.Forms)

XAML Tools (WPF, UWP & Xamarin.Forms)

  • Additional support for more WinUI 3.0 tooling is now available: In this release we have enabled XAML Hot Reload, Live Visual Tree, Live Property Explorer and IntelliSense support for developers building apps using the new WinUI 3.0 preview 3 or newer. Please note that XAML Designer is not yet available and is a known limitation. To learn more about WinUI 3.0 see the documentation and to provide feedback visit the Windows UI XAML GitHub repo.

  • XAML Designer Suggested Actions continues to be available in this release as an early preview. This feature enables easy access to common properties when a control is selected within the XAML Designer. To use this feature first enable it through Options > Preview Features > XAML Suggested Actions. Once enabled click on a supported control and use the lightbulb to expand and interact with the Suggestion Actions UI. In this release supported controls include:

    • For UWP: Border, Button, Canvas, CheckBox, ComboBox, Grid, HyperlinkButton, Image, ListBox, ListView, NavigationView, RadioButton, Slider, StackPanel, TextBlock
    • For WPF: Border, Button, Canvas, CheckBox, ComboBox, Grid, Image, Label, ListBox, ListView, StackPanel, TextBlock, TextBox.

    This feature is available for UWP, WPF .NET Core and WPF .NET Framework (with enabled “New WPF XAML Designer for .NET Framework” feature flag) applications and does not support extensibility, nor is it feature complete.

XAML Suggested Actions
XAML Suggested Actions
  • XAML Suggested Actions - Extensibility: We've also introduced extensibility for 'Suggested Actions'. You can now customize and build your own suggestion dialog for your controls. For more details see our documentation in GitHub

  • The New WPF XAML Designer for .NET Framework Projects: Our new XAML Designer for .NET Framework projects continues to be available for early preview. This brings the same designer and extensibility support available for WPF .NET Core developers to WPF .NET Framework. Benefits of this improved XAML designer includes faster load performance, 64-bit configuration support (custom controls would load normally just like they do in x86 configuration), improved stability and new features such as Suggested Actions.

    • To get started, go to Options > Preview Features, select “New WPF XAML Designer for .NET Framework” and restart Visual Studio. This feature is only available in the Preview channel for early testing; its final release details have not yet been determined. We encourage all WPF .NET Framework customers to give this designer a try and report any issues you encounter through the VS Feedback Hub.

.NET

  • .NET Core Debugging with WSL 2 lets you run and debug your .NET Core console and web applications in WSL 2 from Visual Studio. This allows Windows developers targeting Linux production environments to have a higher fidelity local debugging experience.
.NET Core Debugging with WSL 2
.NET Core Debugging with WSL 2

Experimental Razor Editor Updates

  • HTML and C# semantic colorization
  • Renames of C# symbols reflected in closed Razor files
  • More C# light bulbs in Razor files:
    • Add DebuggerDisplay attribute
    • Create and assign property
    • Create and assign field
    • Implement interface or abstract class, including support for "with pattern", i.e. "Implement interface with Dispose pattern"
    • Generate Equals, Hashcode, Constructor
  • Add null check & Add all null checks for parameters
  • Further improvements to mixed content formatting in Razor files

To enable the experimental Razor editor, go to Tools > Options > Environment > Preview Features, select Enable experimental Razor editor, and then restart Visual Studio.

From Developer Community


Known Issues

See all open issues and available workarounds in Visual Studio 2019 by following the below link.


Feedback and suggestions

We would love to hear from you! For issues, let us know through the Report a Problem option in the upper right-hand corner of either the installer or the Visual Studio IDE itself. The Feedback Icon icon is located in the upper right-hand corner. You can make a product suggestion or track your issues in the Visual Studio Developer Community, where you can ask questions, find answers, and propose new features. You can also get free installation help through our Live Chat support.


Blogs

Take advantage of the insights and recommendations available in the Developer Tools Blogs site to keep you up-to-date on all new releases and include deep dive posts on a broad range of features.


Visual Studio 2019 Release Notes History

For more information relating to past versions of Visual Studio 2019, see the Visual Studio 2019 Release Notes History page.


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