Evaluating ACPI Control Methods Synchronously

A device driver can use the following device control requests to synchronously evaluate control methods that are defined in the ACPI namespace of a device:

  • IOCTL_ACPI_EVAL_METHOD

    Starting with Windows 2000, this request evaluates a control method that is an immediate child object in the ACPI namespace of the device to which the request is sent.

  • IOCTL_ACPI_EVAL_METHOD_EX

    Starting with Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista, this request synchronously evaluates a control method that is supported by the device or a descendant child object of the device to which the request is sent.

The Windows ACPI driver, Acpi.sys, handles these requests on behalf of devices that are specified in the system description tables in the ACPI BIOS. These requests can be used by kernel-mode device drivers that comply with the requirements of Kernel-Mode Driver Framework (KMDF) or Windows Driver Model (WDM). Starting with Windows 8, user-mode device drivers that comply with the requirements of User-Mode Driver Framework (UMDF) can use these requests.

For example, a WDM driver performs the following sequence of operations to use one of these IOCTLs:

  1. Calls IoBuildDeviceIoControlRequest to build the request.

  2. Calls IoCallDriver to send the request down the device stack.

  3. Waits for the I/O manager to signal the driver that the lower-level drivers have completed the request.

  4. Checks the status of the request.

  5. Checks the validity of the output arguments.

  6. Processes the output arguments that are returned to the driver.

  7. Completes the request.

To build a request, a driver calls IoBuildDeviceIoControlRequest and supplies the following parameters:

  • IoControlCode is set to IOCTL_ACPI_EVAL_METHOD or IOCTL_ACPI_EVAL_METHOD_EX.

  • DeviceObject is set to a pointer to the physical device object (PDO) of the device.

  • InputBuffer is set to a pointer to an input buffer structure that depends on the type of input arguments to be passed to the control method. The ACPI driver supports methods that take no input arguments, that take a single integer, that take an ASCII string, or that take a custom array of input arguments. For more information about the supported input buffer structures, see Control Method Input Buffer Structures.

  • InputBufferLength is set to the size, in bytes, of the input buffer that is supplied by InputBuffer.

  • OutputBufferLength supplies the size, in bytes, of the output buffer that is supplied by OutputBuffer.

  • InternalDeviceIoControl is set to FALSE.

  • Event is set to a pointer to a caller-allocated and initialized event object. The driver waits until the I/O manager signals this event, which indicates that the lower-level drivers have completed the request.

  • OutputBuffer supplies a pointer to an ACPI_EVAL_OUTPUT_BUFFER structure that contains the output arguments from the control method. Output arguments are specific to a given control method. For a driver to return any output, it must allocate a buffer that is large enough to hold all the output arguments.

  • IoStatusBlock is set to an IO_STATUS_BLOCK structure. This returns the status of the request that was set by the lower-level drivers.

For a code example of how to evaluate a control method that does not take input arguments, see Evaluating a Control Method Without Input Arguments.

For a code example of how to evaluate a control method that takes input arguments, see Evaluating a Control Method that Takes Input Arguments.