Deploy, manage, and report on Windows Defender Antivirus

Applies to:

  • Windows 10

Audience

  • IT administrators

You can deploy, manage, and report on Windows Defender Antivirus in a number of ways.

As the Windows Defender AV client is installed as a core part of Windows 10, traditional deployment of a client to your endpoints does not apply.

However, in most cases you will still need to enable the protection service on your endpoints with System Center Configuration Manager, Microsoft Intune, Azure Security Center, or Group Policy Objects, which is described in the following table.

You'll also see additional links for:

  • Managing Windows Defender Antivirus protection, including managing product and protection updates
  • Reporting on Windows Defender Antivirus protection
Important

In most cases, Windows 10 will disable Windows Defender Antivirus if it finds another antivirus product running and up-to-date. You must disable or uninstall third-party antivirus products before Windows Defender Antivirus will be functioning. If you re-enable or install third-party antivirus products, then Windows 10 will automatically disable Windows Defender Antivirus.

Tool Deployment options (2) Management options (network-wide configuration and policy or baseline deployment) (3) Reporting options
System Center Configuration Manager (1) Use the Endpoint Protection point site system role and enable Endpoint Protection with custom client settings With default and customized antimalware policies and client management With the default Configuration Manager Monitoring workspace and email alerts
Microsoft Intune Deploy the Microsoft Intune client to endpoints Use and deploy a custom Intune policy and use the Intune console to manage tasks Monitor endpoint protection in the Microsoft Intune administration console
Windows Management Instrumentation Deploy with Group Policy, System Center Configuration Manager, or manually on individual endpoints. Use the Set method of the MSFT_MpPreference class and the Update method of the MSFT_MpSignature class Use the MSFT_MpComputerStatus class and the get method of associated classes in the Windows Defender WMIv2 Provider
PowerShell Deploy with Group Policy, System Center Configuration Manager, or manually on individual endpoints. Use the Set-MpPreference and Update-MpSignature cmdlets available in the Defender module Use the appropriate Get- cmdlets available in the Defender module
Group Policy and Active Directory (domain-joined) Use a Group Policy Object to deploy configuration changes and ensure Windows Defender Antivirus is enabled. Use Group Policy Objects (GPOs) to Configure update options for Windows Defender Antivirus and Configure Windows Defender features Endpoint reporting is not available with Group Policy. You can generate a list of Group Policies to determine if any settings or policies are not applied
Microsoft Azure Deploy Microsoft Antimalware for Azure in the Azure portal, by using Visual Studio virtual machine configuration, or using Azure PowerShell cmdlets. You can also Install Endpoint protection in Azure Security Center Configure Microsoft Antimalware for Virtual Machines and Cloud Services with Azure PowerShell cmdlets or use code samples Use Microsoft Antimalware for Virtual Machines and Cloud Services with Azure PowerShell cmdlets to enable monitoring. You can also review usage reports in Azure Active Directory to determine suspicious activity, including the Possibly infected devices report and configure an SIEM tool to report on Windows Defender Antivirus events and add that tool as an app in AAD.
  1. The availability of some functions and features, especially related to cloud-delivered protection, differ between System Center Configuration Manager, current branch (for example, System Center Configuration Manager 2016) and System Center Configuration Manager 2012. In this library, we've focused on Windows 10, Windows Server 2016, and System Center Configuration Manager, current branch (2016). See the Utilize Microsoft cloud-provided protection in Windows Defender Antivirus topic for a table that describes the major differences. (Return to table)

  2. In Windows 10, Windows Defender Antivirus is a component available without installation or deployment of an additional client or service. It will automatically be enabled when third-party antivirus products are either uninstalled or out of date (except on Windows Server 2016). Traditional deployment therefore is not required. Deployment here refers to ensuring the Windows Defender Antivirus component is available and enabled on endpoints or servers. (Return to table)

  3. Configuration of features and protection, including configuring product and protection updates, are further described in the Configure Windows Defender Antivirus features section in this library. (Return to table)

In this section

Topic Description
Deploy and enable Windows Defender Antivirus protection While the client is installed as a core part of Windows 10, and traditional deployment does not apply, you will still need to enable the client on your endpoints with System Center Configuration Manager, Microsoft Intune, or Group Policy Objects.
Manage Windows Defender Antivirus updates and apply baselines There are two parts to updating Windows Defender Antivirus: updating the client on endpoints (product updates), and updating definitions (protection updates). You can update definitions in a number of ways, using System Center Configuration Manager, Group Policy, PowerShell, and WMI.
Monitor and report on Windows Defender Antivirus protection You can use System Center Configuration Manager, the Update Compliance add-in for Microsoft Operations Management Suite, a third-party SIEM product (by consuming Windows event logs), or Microsoft Intune to monitor protection status and create reports about endpoint protection