Math.Ceiling Math.Ceiling Math.Ceiling Math.Ceiling Method

Definition

Returns the smallest integral value greater than or equal to the specified number.

Overloads

Ceiling(Decimal) Ceiling(Decimal) Ceiling(Decimal) Ceiling(Decimal)

Returns the smallest integral value that is greater than or equal to the specified decimal number.

Ceiling(Double) Ceiling(Double) Ceiling(Double) Ceiling(Double)

Returns the smallest integral value that is greater than or equal to the specified double-precision floating-point number.

Remarks

The behavior of this method follows IEEE Standard 754, section 4. This kind of rounding is sometimes called rounding toward positive infinity.

Ceiling(Decimal) Ceiling(Decimal) Ceiling(Decimal) Ceiling(Decimal)

Returns the smallest integral value that is greater than or equal to the specified decimal number.

public:
 static System::Decimal Ceiling(System::Decimal d);
public static decimal Ceiling (decimal d);
static member Ceiling : decimal -> decimal
Public Shared Function Ceiling (d As Decimal) As Decimal

Parameters

d
Decimal Decimal Decimal Decimal

A decimal number.

Returns

The smallest integral value that is greater than or equal to d. Note that this method returns a Decimal instead of an integral type.

Examples

The following example illustrates the Math.Ceiling(Decimal) method and contrasts it with the Floor(Decimal) method.

decimal[] values = {7.03m, 7.64m, 0.12m, -0.12m, -7.1m, -7.6m};
Console.WriteLine("  Value          Ceiling          Floor\n");
foreach (decimal value in values)
   Console.WriteLine("{0,7} {1,16} {2,14}", 
                     value, Math.Ceiling(value), Math.Floor(value));
// The example displays the following output to the console:
//         Value          Ceiling          Floor
//       
//          7.03                8              7
//          7.64                8              7
//          0.12                1              0
//         -0.12                0             -1
//          -7.1               -7             -8
//          -7.6               -7             -8
Dim values() As Decimal = {7.03d, 7.64d, 0.12d, -0.12d, -7.1d, -7.6d}
Console.WriteLine("  Value          Ceiling          Floor")
Console.WriteLine()
For Each value As Decimal In values
   Console.WriteLine("{0,7} {1,16} {2,14}", _
                     value, Math.Ceiling(value), Math.Floor(value))
Next   
' The example displays the following output to the console:
'         Value          Ceiling          Floor
'       
'          7.03                8              7
'          7.64                8              7
'          0.12                1              0
'         -0.12                0             -1
'          -7.1               -7             -8
'          -7.6               -7             -8

Remarks

The behavior of this method follows IEEE Standard 754, section 4. This kind of rounding is sometimes called rounding toward positive infinity. In other words, if d is positive, the presence of any fractional component causes d to be rounded to the next highest integer. If d is negative, the rounding operation causes any fractional component of d to be discarded. The operation of this method differs from the Floor(Decimal) method, which supports rounding toward negative infinity.

See Also

Ceiling(Double) Ceiling(Double) Ceiling(Double) Ceiling(Double)

Returns the smallest integral value that is greater than or equal to the specified double-precision floating-point number.

public:
 static double Ceiling(double a);
public static double Ceiling (double a);
static member Ceiling : double -> double
Public Shared Function Ceiling (a As Double) As Double

Parameters

a
Double Double Double Double

A double-precision floating-point number.

Returns

The smallest integral value that is greater than or equal to a. If a is equal to NaN, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity, that value is returned. Note that this method returns a Double instead of an integral type.

Examples

The following example illustrates the Math.Ceiling(Double) method and contrasts it with the Floor(Double) method.

double[] values = {7.03, 7.64, 0.12, -0.12, -7.1, -7.6};
Console.WriteLine("  Value          Ceiling          Floor\n");
foreach (double value in values)
   Console.WriteLine("{0,7} {1,16} {2,14}", 
                     value, Math.Ceiling(value), Math.Floor(value));
// The example displays the following output to the console:
//         Value          Ceiling          Floor
//       
//          7.03                8              7
//          7.64                8              7
//          0.12                1              0
//         -0.12                0             -1
//          -7.1               -7             -8
//          -7.6               -7             -8
Dim values() As Double = {7.03, 7.64, 0.12, -0.12, -7.1, -7.6}
Console.WriteLine("  Value          Ceiling          Floor")
Console.WriteLine()
For Each value As Double In values
   Console.WriteLine("{0,7} {1,16} {2,14}", _
                     value, Math.Ceiling(value), Math.Floor(value))
Next   
' The example displays the following output to the console:
'         Value          Ceiling          Floor
'       
'          7.03                8              7
'          7.64                8              7
'          0.12                1              0
'         -0.12                0             -1
'          -7.1               -7             -8
'          -7.6               -7             -8

Remarks

The behavior of this method follows IEEE Standard 754, section 4. This kind of rounding is sometimes called rounding toward positive infinity. In other words, if a is positive, the presence of any fractional component causes a to be rounded to the next highest integer. If a is negative, the rounding operation causes any fractional component of a to be discarded. The operation of this method differs from the Floor(Double) method, which supports rounding toward negative infinity.

See Also

Applies to