Introduction

Completed

Many applications consist of programs that run on several different computers or devices. In such distributed applications, messages must be sent between the components across networks and long distances. Even on the same server or in the same data center, loosely coupled architectures require mechanisms for components to communicate. Reliable messaging is often a critical problem.

Suppose you work at a software company that develops a music-sharing application. Musicians can upload music they create to your platform by using a web front end or a mobile app. They can listen to and comment on other members' work. The application consists of a website that runs at your ISP, a mobile app that runs on users' mobile devices, a web API that runs in Azure, and an Azure SQL Database where data is stored.

You have observed that at times of high demand, some music files are not successfully uploaded, and some comments are not posted. Your testing shows that these issues are caused by dropped messages between front-end components and the web API. You plan to solve these issues by using one or more of the following technologies: Azure Storage queues, Azure Event Hubs, Azure Event Grid, and Azure Service Bus.

Here, you will learn how to choose the right messaging technology in Azure for each communication task in a distributed application.

Learning objectives

In this module, you will:

  • Describe events and messages, and the challenges you can use them to solve in a distributed application.
  • Identify scenarios in which Storage queue is the best messaging technology for an application.
  • Identify scenarios in which Event Grid is the best messaging technology for an application.
  • Identify scenarios in which Event Hubs is the best messaging technology for an application.
  • Identify scenarios in which Service Bus is the best messaging technology for an application.