Stable channel release notes for the Windows App SDK

The stable channel provides releases of the Windows App SDK that are supported for use by apps in production environments. Apps that use the stable release of the Windows App SDK can also be published to the Microsoft Store.

The following releases of the stable channel are currently available:

If you'd like to upgrade an existing app from an older version of the Windows App SDK to a newer version, see Update existing projects to the latest release of the Windows App SDK.

Downloads for Windows App SDK

The Windows App SDK VSIX and runtime (installer and MSIX packages) are available at Downloads for the Windows App SDK. The SDK downloads include the Visual Studio extensions to create and build new projects using the Windows App SDK. The runtime downloads include the installer and MSIX packages used to deploy apps. If you haven't done so already, Install tools for the Windows App SDK.

Note

If you have Windows App SDK Visual Studio extensions (VSIX) already installed, then uninstall them before installing a new version. For directions, see Manage extensions for Visual Studio.

Version 1.0

The latest available release of the 1.0.x lineage of the stable channel of the Windows App SDK is version 1.0.3. 1.0.x supports all stable channel features (see the Features available by release channel section in Windows App SDK release channels).

Version 1.0.3

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes critical bug fixes for the 1.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Fixed issue causing C# apps with WebView2 to crash on launch when the C/C++ Runtime (CRT) isn't installed.
  • Fixed touch input issues causing problems with keyboard shortcuts and other scenarios. For more information, see issue 6291 on GitHub.

Note: We don't usually add functionality in a servicing release, but this release's WebView2 fix required us to update to the latest version of the WebView2 SDK (1020.46 to 1185.39). See Release Notes for the WebView2 SDK for additional information on WebView2 1.0.1185.39 and Distribute your app and the WebView2 Runtime for additional information on the WebView2 Runtime.

Version 1.0.2

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes critical bug fixes for the 1.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Fixed layout cycle issue causing an app to crash when scrolling to the end of a ListView. For more information see issue 6218 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue causing C# apps to crash on launch when the C/C++ Runtime (CRT) isn't installed. However, the CRT is still required for C# apps using WebView2. For more information see issue 2117 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue where applications with Single-project MSIX did not generate a .appinstaller file. For more information see issue 1821 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue where WinUI applications did not support .NET 6 dotnet build.

Version 1.0.1

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes critical bug fixes and multi-window support for the 1.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Fixed issue causing the MddBootstrapAutoinitializer to not compile with enabled ImplicitUsings. For more information see issue 1686 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue where focus in WebView2 would be unexpectedly lost causing input and selection issues. For more information, see issue 5615 & issue 5570 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue causing the in-app toolbar in Visual Studio to be unclickable when using a custom title bar in a WinUI 3 app.
  • Fixed issue causing Snap Layout to not appear when using a custom title bar in a WinUI 3 app. For more information, see issue 6333 & issue 6246 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue causing an exception when setting Window.ExtendsContentIntoTitleBar property when Window.SetTitlebar has been called with a still-loading UIElement.
  • Fixed issue where Single-project MSIX apps did not support dotnet build.
  • Fixed issue causing unpackaged apps to not install after installing a packaged app. For more information, see issue 1871 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue reducing performance during mouse drag operations.
  • Fixed crash when calling GetWindowIdFromWindow() in unpackaged apps. For more information, see discussion 1891 on GitHub.

The limitations and known issues for version 1.0 also apply to version 1.0.1.

Additionally, for apps with custom title bars, we have made changes in this release (and fixed numerous issues) that include fixes to the glass window used for drag&drop operations. The recommendation is to use the default values and behaviors (give them a try!). If your title bar used margins so that the default caption buttons were interactive, we recommend visualizing your drag region by setting the background of your title bar to red and then adjusting the margins to extend the drag region to the caption controls.

New features

We have stabilized and enabled the creation of multiple windows on the same thread in WinUI 3 applications. See issue 5918 for more information.

Version 1.0 Stable

The following sections describe new and updated features, limitations, and known issues for 1.0 Stable.

WinUI 3

WinUI 3 is the native user experience (UX) framework for Windows App SDK. In this release we've added multiple new features from Windows App SDK 0.8 and stabilized issues from 1.0 Preview releases.

New features and updates:

  • We've added new controls (PipsPager, Expander, BreadcrumbBar) and updated existing controls to reflect the latest Windows styles from WinUI 2.6.
  • Single-project MSIX packaging is supported in WinUI by creating a new application using the “Blank App, Packaged…” template.
  • We now support deploying WinUI 3 apps without MSIX-packaging on Windows versions 1809 and above. Please view Create your first WinUI 3 project for additional information.
  • WinUI 3 projects can now set their target version down to Windows 10, version 1809. Previously, they could only be set as low as version 1903.
  • In-app toolbar, Hot Reload, & Live Visual Tree for WinUI packaged apps are supported in Visual Studio 2022 Preview 5 and GA.

Important limitations:

  • Known issues for both packaged and unpackaged WinUI applications:

    • Run-time error in C++ or C# apps that reference a C++ Windows Runtime Component:
      • To resolve, add the below target to the end of the Windows Runtime Component's .vcxproj:

        <Target Name="GetPriIndexName">
        <PropertyGroup>
            <!-- Winmd library targets use the default root namespace of the project for the App package name -->
            <PriIndexName Condition="'$(RootNamespace)' != ''">$(RootNamespace)</PriIndexName>
            <!-- If RootNamespace is empty fall back to TargetName -->
            <PriIndexName Condition="$(PriIndexName) == ''">$(TargetName)</PriIndexName>
        </PropertyGroup>
        </Target>
        
      • The expected error will be similar to WinRT originate error - 0x80004005 : 'Cannot locate resource from 'ms-appx:///BlankPage.xaml'.'.

  • Known issues for WinUI applications with Single-project MSIX (Blank App, Packaged template):

    • Missing Package & Publish menu item until you restart Visual Studio: When creating a new app with Single-project MSIX in both Visual Studio 2019 and Visual Studio 2022 using the Blank App, Packaged (WinUI 3 in Desktop) project template, the command to publish the project doesn't appear in the menu until you close and re-open Visual Studio.
    • A C# app with Single-project MSIX will not compile without the "C++ (v14x) Universal Windows Platform Tools" optional component installed. See Install tools for the Windows App SDK for additional information.
    • Potential run-time error in an app with Single-project MSIX that consumes types defined in a referenced Windows Runtime Component: To resolve, manually add activatable class entries to the appxmanifest.xml.
      • The expected error in C# applications is “COMException: Class not registered (0x80040154 (REGDB_E_CLASSNOTREG)).
      • The expected error in C++/WinRT applications is “winrt::hresult_class_not_registered”.
  • Known issues for WinUI applications without MSIX-packaging (unpackaged apps):

  • Known issues for packaging and deploying WinUI applications:

    • The Package command is not supported in WinUI apps with Single-project MSIX (Blank App, Packaged template). Instead, use the Package & Publish command to create an MSIX package.
    • To create a NuGet package from a C# Class Library with the Pack command, ensure the active Configuration is Release.
    • The Pack command is not supported in C++ Windows Runtime Components to create a NuGet package.

For more info, or to get started developing with WinUI, see:

Windowing

The Windows App SDK provides an AppWindow class that evolves the previous easy-to-use Windows.UI.WindowManagement.AppWindow preview class and makes it available to all Windows apps, including Win32, WPF, and WinForms.

New Features

  • AppWindow is a high-level windowing API that allows for easy-to-use windowing scenarios that integrates well with the Windows user experience and with other apps. Represents a high-level abstraction of a system-managed container of the content of an app. This is the container in which your content is hosted, and represents the entity that users interact with when they resize and move your app on screen. For developers familiar with Win32, the AppWindow can be seen as a high-level abstraction of the HWND.
  • DisplayArea represents a high-level abstraction of a HMONITOR, follows the same principles as AppWindow.
  • DisplayAreaWatcher allows a developer to observe changes in the display topology and enumerate DisplayAreas currently defined in the system.

For more info, see Manage app windows.

Input

These are the input APIs that support WinUI and provide a lower level API surface for developers to achieve more advanced input interactions.

New Features

Important limitations

  • All PointerPoint static factory functions have been removed: GetCurrentPoint, GetCurrentPointTransformed, GetIntermediatePoints, and GetIntermediatePointsTransformed.
  • The Windows App SDK doesn't support retrieving PointerPoint objects with pointer IDs. Instead, you can use the PointerPoint member function GetTransformedPoint to retrieve a transformed version of an existing PointerPoint object. For intermediate points, you can use the PointerEventArgs member functions GetIntermediatePoints and GetTransformedIntermediatePoints.
  • Direct use of the platform SDK API Windows.UI.Core.CoreDragOperation will not work with WinUI applications.
  • PointerPoint properties RawPosition and ContactRectRaw were removed because they referred to non-predicted values, which were the same as the normal values in the OS. Use Position and ContactRect instead. Pointer prediction is now handled with the Microsoft.UI.Input.PointerPredictor API object.

App Lifecycle

Most of the App Lifecycle features already exist in the UWP platform, and have been brought into the Windows App SDK for use by desktop app types, especially unpackaged Console apps, Win32 apps, Windows Forms apps, and WPF apps. The Windows App SDK implementation of these features cannot be used in UWP apps, since there are equivalent features in the UWP platform itself.

Important

If you're working on a UWP app, refer to Migrate from UWP to the Windows App SDK.

Non-UWP apps can also be packaged into MSIX packages. While these apps can use some of the Windows App SDK App Lifecycle features, they must use the manifest approach where this is available. For example, they cannot use the Windows App SDK RegisterForXXXActivation APIs and must instead register for rich activation via the manifest.

All the constraints for packaged apps also apply to WinUI apps, which are packaged, and there are additional considerations as described below.

Important considerations:

  • Rich activation: GetActivatedEventArgs

  • Register/Unregister for rich activation

    • Unpackaged apps: Fully usable.
    • Packaged apps: Not usable use the app's MSIX manifest instead.
    • For more info, see Rich activation.
  • Single/Multi-instancing

    • Unpackaged apps: Fully usable.
    • Packaged apps: Fully usable.
    • WinUI apps: If an app wants to detect other instances and redirect an activation, it must do so as early as possible, and before initializing any windows, etc. To enable this, the app must define DISABLE_XAML_GENERATED_MAIN, and write a custom Main (C#) or WinMain (C++) where it can do the detection and redirection.
    • RedirectActivationToAsync is an async call, and you should not wait on an async call if your app is running in an STA. For Windows Forms and C# WinUI apps, you can declare Main to be async, if necessary. For C++ WinUI and C# WPF apps, you cannot declare Main to be async, so instead you need to move the redirect call to another thread to ensure you don't block the STA.
    • For more info, see App instancing.
  • Power/State notifications

    • Unpackaged apps: Fully usable.
    • Packaged apps: Fully usable.
    • For more info, see Power management.

Known issue:

  • File Type associations incorrectly encode %1 to be %251 when setting the Verb handler's command line template, which crashes unpackaged Win32 apps. You can manually edit the Registry value to be %1 instead as a partial workaround. If the target file path has a space in it, then it will still fail and there is no workaround for that scenario.
  • These Single/Multi-instancing bugs will be fixed in an upcoming servicing patch:
    • AppInstance redirection doesn't work when compiled for x86
    • Registering a key, unregistering it, and re-registering it causes the app to crash

DWriteCore

DWriteCore is the Windows App SDK implementation of DirectWrite, which is the DirectX API for high-quality text rendering, resolution-independent outline fonts, and full Unicode text and layout support. DWriteCore is a form of DirectWrite that runs on versions of Windows down to Windows 10, version 1809 (10.0; Build 17763), and opens the door for you to use it cross-platform.

Features DWriteCore contains all of the features of DirectWrite, with a few exceptions.

Important limitations

  • DWriteCore does not contain the following DirectWrite features:
    • Per-session fonts
    • End-user defined character (EUDC) fonts
    • Font-streaming APIs
  • Low-level rendering API support is partial.
  • DWriteCore doesn't interoperate with Direct2D, but you can use IDWriteGlyphRunAnalysis and IDWriteBitmapRenderTarget.

For more information, see DWriteCore overview.

MRT Core

MRT Core is a streamlined version of the modern Windows Resource Management System that is distributed as part of the Windows App SDK.

Important limitations

  • In .NET projects, resource files copy-pasted into the project folder aren't indexed on F5 if the app was already built. As a workaround, rebuild the app. See issue 1503 for more info.
  • In .NET projects, when a resource file is added to the project using the Visual Studio UI, the files may not be indexed by default. See issue 1786 for more info. To work around this issue, please remove the entries below in the CSPROJ file:
    <ItemGroup>
        <Content Remove="<image file name>" />
    </ItemGroup>
    <ItemGroup>
        <PRIResource Remove="<resw file name>" />
    </ItemGroup>
    
  • For unpackaged C++ WinUI apps, the resource URI is not built correctly. To work around this issue, add the following in the vcxproj:
    <!-- Add the following after <Import Project="$(VCTargetsPath)\Microsoft.Cpp.props" /> -->
    
    <PropertyGroup>
        <AppxPriInitialPath></AppxPriInitialPath>   
    </PropertyGroup>
    

For more information, see Manage resources with MRT Core.

Deployment

New Features and updates

  • You can auto-initialize the Windows App SDK through the WindowsPackageType project property to load the Windows App SDK runtime and call the Windows App SDK APIs. See Create your first WinUI 3 project for instructions.
  • Unpackaged apps can deploy Windows App SDK by integrating in the standalone Windows App SDK .exe installer into your existing MSI or setup program. For more info, see Windows App SDK deployment guide for unpackaged apps.
  • Unpackaged .NET apps can also use .NET wrapper for the bootstrapper API to dynamically take a dependency on the Windows App SDK framework package at run time. For more info about the .NET wrapper, see .NET wrapper library.
  • Packaged apps can use the deployment API to verify and ensure that all required packages are installed on the machine. For more info about how the deployment API works, see the deployment guide for packaged apps.

Important limitations

  • The .NET wrapper for the bootstrapper API is only intended for use by unpackaged .NET applications to simplify access to the Windows App SDK.
  • Only MSIX packaged apps that are full trust or have the packageManagement restricted capability have the permission to use the deployment API to install the main and singleton package dependencies. Support for partial-trust packaged apps will be coming in later releases.
  • When F5 testing an x86 app which uses the DeploymentManager.Initialize method on an x64 system, ensure that the x64 framework is first installed by running the WindowsAppRuntimeInstall.exe. Otherwise, you will encounter a NOT_FOUND error due to Visual Studio not deploying the x64 framework, which normally occurs through Store deployment or sideloading.

Other limitations and known issues

  • No support for Any CPU build configuration: When adding the Windows App SDK to an existing .NET application or component that supports Any CPU, you must specify the desired architecture: x86, x64 or arm64.

  • Upgrading from .NET 5 to .NET 6: When upgrading in the Visual Studio UI, you may run into build errors. As a workaround, manually update your project file's TargetFrameworkPackage to the below:

        <TargetFramework>net6.0-windows10.0.19041.0</TargetFramework> 
    
  • C# Single-project MSIX app doesn't compile if C++ UWP Tools aren't installed. If you have a C# Single-project MSIX project, then you'll need to install the C++ (v14x) Universal Windows Platform Tools optional component.

  • Subsequent language VSIX fails to install into Visual Studio 2019 when multiple versions of Visual Studio 2019 are installed. If you have multiple versions of Visual Studio 2019 installed (e.g. Release and Preview) and then install the Windows App SDK VSIX for both C++ and C#, the second installation will fail. To resolve, uninstall the Single-project MSIX Packaging Tools for Visual Studio 2019 after the first language VSIX. View this feedback for additional information about this issue.

  • An alternative to DispatcherQueue.TryEnqueue (for resuming execution on the dispatcher queue thread) is to use the resume_foreground helper function in the Windows Implementation Library (WIL):

    1. Add a reference to your project to the Microsoft.Windows.ImplementationLibrary NuGet package.
    2. Add #include <wil/cppwinrt_helpers.h> to your pch.h.
    3. Add #include <winrt/Microsoft.UI.Dispatching.h> to your pch.h.
    4. Now co_await wil::resume_foreground(your_dispatcherqueue);.

Version 0.8

The latest available release of the 0.8.x lineage of the stable channel of the Windows App SDK is version 0.8.8.

Note

The Windows App SDK was previously known by the code name Project Reunion. Some SDK assets in version 0.8 and earlier still use the code name. Some areas of the documentation still use Project Reunion when referring to an existing asset or a specified earlier release.

Version 0.8.8

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes critical bug fixes for the 0.8.0 release.

Note

For C# developers, one of the following .NET SDK versions (or later) is required: 6.0.202, 6.0.104, 5.0.407, 5.0.213. To update your .NET SDK version, visit .NET Downloads or update to the latest version of Visual Studio. Without the required .NET SDK version, when updating your NuGet package you will see an error like: "This version of WindowsAppSDK requires WinRT.Runtime.dll version 1.6 or greater.".

Bug fixes:

  • Fixed touch input issues in TextBox regarding soft keyboard and general interaction. These issues also affected keyboard shortcuts. For more information, see issue 6291 on GitHub.
  • Fixed issue where an app window would sometimes show as inactive when active.
  • Fixed performance issue caused by UIA (UI Automation) running in external processes.
  • Fixed app stability issue with pen input.
  • Fixed issue where the render of png icons in a Menu are dramatically delayed because of UIA.

Version 0.8.7

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes several performance updates for C#/.NET applications. To update to this version, you'll need to reference the latest Windows SDK package version. To do that, add the property <WindowsSdkPackageVersion>10.0.<sdk_version>.24</WindowsSdkPackageVersion> to your .csproj file with the SDK version your app is targeting from the TargetFramework property. For example:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
   <PropertyGroup>
       <OutputType>WinExe</OutputType>
       <TargetFramework>net6.0-windows10.0.19041.0</TargetFramework>
       <TargetPlatformMinVersion>10.0.17763.0</TargetPlatformMinVersion>
       <WindowsSdkPackageVersion>10.0.19041.24</WindowsSdkPackageVersion>
   <PropertyGroup>
   ...

This version of the Windows SDK projection will be available in an upcoming .NET 6 and .NET 5 servicing release. After that .NET SDK update is available, you should remove the <WindowsSdkPackageVersion> property from your project file.

If you don't set this property, then you'll see an error like: "Error: This version of Project Reunion requires WinRT.Runtime.dll version 1.6 or greater."

Version 0.8.6

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes several performance improvements for C#/.NET applications for the 0.8.0 release.

To update to this version of Windows App SDK, you will need to have the latest .NET SDK December update installed (either .NET SDK 5.0.404 or later, or .NET SDK 5.0.210 or later). You can now download the latest .NET 5 SDK here. If you do not have the minimum required version of the .NET SDK installed, you will see an error like "Error: This version of Project Reunion requires WinRT.Runtime.dll version 1.4 or greater."

Bug Fixes

For a detailed list of the performance improvements, see the C#/WinRT 1.4.1 release notes.

Version 0.8.5

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes more critical bug fixes for the 0.8.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Fixed issue that was causing WinUI apps using pointer input to crash.
  • Fixed issue causing the title bar buttons (min, max, close) to not have rounded corners on Windows 11.
  • Fixed issue causing the resizing layout options to not appear when hovering over maximize/restore button on Windows 11.
  • Fixed issue causing a crashing exception where creating a PointCollection object. For more information, see issue 971 on Github.

The limitations and known issues for version 0.8 also apply to version 0.8.5, unless marked otherwise in the section below.

Version 0.8.4

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes more critical bug fixes for the 0.8.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Fixes for custom title bars so that ContentDialog doesn't cover it up, and the title bar buttons are rounded.
  • Fix for a crash in image processing when the display scale is changed.
  • Fixes clipping bugs where UI disappear or clipped incorrectly

The limitations and known issues for version 0.8 also apply to version 0.8.4, unless marked otherwise in the section below.

Version 0.8.3

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes more critical bug fixes for the 0.8.0 release.

Bug fixes

Keyboard focus was being lost when a window was minimized and then restored, requiring a mouse click to restore focus.

The limitations and known issues for version 0.8 also apply to version 0.8.3, unless marked otherwise in the section below.

Version 0.8.2

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes more critical bug fixes for the 0.8.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Windows App SDK and WinUI 3 are now supported in Visual Studio 2022 Preview 2 and later.
  • For .NET apps, you may receive the following error when passing in an array of enums: Object contains non-primitive or non-blittable data.
  • Writing using the HandWriting Panel inside a textbox causes a crash
  • Icons/images always load at their 100% scale value rather than based on the monitor scale value
  • Garbage collection of EventSource<T> causes subsequent failure to unsubscribe handlers (see GitHub issue for more details)
  • Security fix – see CVE-2021-34533 for more details.
  • SwapChainPanel.CompositionScaleChanged sometimes returning incorrect CompositionScale values after changing display scale

The limitations and known issues for version 0.8 also apply to version 0.8.2, unless marked otherwise in the section below.

Version 0.8.1

This is a servicing release of the Windows App SDK that includes a few critical bug fixes for the 0.8.0 release.

Bug fixes

  • Windows App SDK cannot run on the latest Windows Insider build
  • Crash in EditableComboBox when entering a value that does not appear in dropdown
  • WebView2 doesn't allow user to tab out once focused has been received
  • Fully qualify Windows.Foundation.Metadata.DefaultOverload namespace in WinUI generated code to avoid namespace ambiguity
  • Security fix – see CVE-2021-34489 for more details.

The limitations and known issues for version 0.8 also apply to version 0.8.1, unless marked otherwise in the section below.

Version 0.8.0 Stable

New features and updates

This release supports all stable channel features.

WinUI 3

This release includes many bug fixes and improved stabilization across WinUI 3. These are all of the new changes in WinUI 3 since the release of WinUI 3 - Project Reunion 0.5:

  • The Pivot control has been added back in and can now be used in any WinUI 3 app.

  • All bug fixes from Project Reunion v0.5.5, v0.5.6, and v0.5.7 are included with this release.

  • New bug fixes, including:

    • Mouse right-click in TextBox crashes the application
    • NavigationView causes crash in UWP, Reunion 0.5 Preview
    • ProgressBar doesn't show difference between Paused and Error option
    • Crash in RichEditBox when copying/pasting/changing text style
    • Window caption buttons are misplaced when SetTitleBar is not set or null

    For the full list of bugs addressed in this release, see our GitHub repo.

  • The ColorHelper.ToDisplayName API is no longer available.

  • The following types have been removed:

    • Microsoft.Graphics.IGeometrySource2D
    • Microsoft.Graphics.IGeometrySource2DInterop

    Use Windows.Graphics.IGeometrySource2D and Windows.Graphics.IGeometrySource2DInterop instead.

  • All types in the Microsoft.System namespace have been moved to the Microsoft.UI.Dispatching namespace, including the DispatcherQueue class.

  • The AcrylicBrush.BackgroundSource property has been removed, since HostBackdrop is not supported as a BackgroundSource in WinUI 3.

For more information on WinUI, see Windows UI 3 Library (WinUI).

To see WinUI 3 controls and features in action, you can clone and build the WinUI 3 Controls Gallery app from GitHub, or download the app from the Microsoft Store.

To get started developing with WinUI, check out the following articles:

DWriteCore

This release of DWriteCore includes the following new and updated features. DWriteCore is introduced and described in the DWriteCore overview.

Note

DWriteCoreCreateFactory is functionally the same as the DWriteCreateFactory function exported by the system version of DirectWrite. The DWriteCore function has a different name to avoid ambiguity in the event that you link both DWriteCore.lib and DWrite.lib.

For DWriteCore and DirectWrite API reference, see DWriteCore API Reference and DirectWrite API Reference.

MRTCore

  • The Build Action for resources is automatically set when you add the resource to your project, reducing the need for manual project configuration.

Limitations

  • This release is not currently supported on the Dev Channel of the Windows Insider Program. This is fixed in version 0.8.1.

  • Desktop apps (C# or C++ desktop): This release is supported for use only in desktop apps (C++ or C#) that are packaged using MSIX. To use the Windows App SDK in unpackaged desktop apps, you must use the experimental release channel.

Important

If you're working on a UWP app, refer to Migrate from UWP to the Windows App SDK.

Known issues

  • WinUI 3 tooling such as Live Visual Tree, Live Property Explorer, and Hot Reload in version 0.8 and later requires Visual Studio 2019 16.11 Preview 3 and later.

  • Apps currently using WinUI 3 and the Windows App SDK 0.8 cannot use class libraries that use Project Reunion 0.5. Update the class libraries to use the Windows App SDK 0.8.

  • .NET apps must target build 18362 or higher: Your TFM must be set to net5.0-windows10.0.18362 or higher, and your packaging project's must be set to 18362 or higher. For more info, see GitHub issue #921.

  • You may encounter a crash when switching frequently between light and dark mode.

  • For .NET apps, you may receive the following error when passing in an array of enums: Object contains non-primitive or non-blittable data. This is fixed in version 0.8.2.

  • For .NET apps, there is currently no way to opt out of an image getting indexed as an app resource using the Visual Studio UI. To work around this, add a Directory.Build.targets (see Customize your build - Visual Studio for instructions) to the project and remove the image(s) as follows:

    • To remove specific images (note that the relative path is needed):

      <Project> 
      <ItemGroup> 
          <Content Remove="..\Bitmap1.bmp" />
      </ItemGroup>
      </Project>
      
    • To remove images based on metadata:

      <Project>
      <ItemGroup>
          <Content Remove="@(None->WithMetadataValue('Pack','true'))" />
      </ItemGroup>
      </Project>
      

    A fix for this issue is planned for an upcoming release - at that point, the above workarounds will no longer be needed.

Version 0.5

The latest available release of the 0.5.x lineage of the stable channel of the Windows App SDK is version 0.5.9.

New features and updates

This release supports all stable channel features.

Known issues and limitations

This release has the following limitations and known issues:

  • Desktop apps (C# or C++ desktop): This release is supported for use only in desktop apps (C++ or C#) that are packaged using MSIX. To use the Windows App SDK in unpackaged desktop apps, you must use the experimental release channel.
  • .NET apps must target build 18362 or higher: Your TFM must be set to net5.0-windows10.0.18362 or higher, and your packaging project's <TargetPlatformVersion> must be set to 18362 or higher. For more info, see the known issue on GitHub.

Important

If you're working on a UWP app, refer to Migrate from UWP to the Windows App SDK.