Export-​Console

Exports the names of snap-ins in the current session to a console file.

Syntax

Export-Console
      [[-Path] <String>]
      [-Confirm]
      [-Force]
      [-NoClobber]
      [-WhatIf]
      [<CommonParameters>]

Description

The Export-Console cmdlet exports the names of the Windows PowerShell snap-ins in the current session to a Windows PowerShell console file (.psc1). You can use this cmdlet to save the snap-ins for use in future sessions.

To add the snap-ins in the .psc1 console file to a session, start Windows PowerShell (Powershell.exe) at the command line by using Cmd.exe or another Windows PowerShell session, and then use the PSConsoleFile parameter of Powershell.exe to specify the console file.

For more information about Windows PowerShell snap-ins, see about_PSSnapins.

Examples

Example 1: Export the names of snap-ins in the current session

PS C:\> Export-Console -Path $pshome\Consoles\ConsoleS1.psc1

This command exports the names of Windows PowerShell snap-ins in the current session to the ConsoleS1.psc1 file in the Consoles folder of the Windows PowerShell installation folder, $pshome.

Example 2: Export the names of snap-ins to the most recent console file

PS C:\> Export-Console

This command exports the names of Windows PowerShell snap-ins from current session to the Windows PowerShell console file that was most recently used in the current session. It overwrites the previous file contents.

If you have not exported a console file during the current session, you are prompted for permission to continue and then prompted for a file name.

Example 3: Add a snap-in and export the names of snap-ins

PS C:\> Add-PSSnapin NewPSSnapin
PS C:\> Export-Console -path NewPSSnapinConsole.psc1
PS C:\> powershell.exe -PsConsoleFile NewPsSnapinConsole.psc1

These commands add the NewPSSnapin Windows PowerShell snap-in to the current session, export the names of Windows PowerShell snap-ins in the current session to a console file, and then start a Windows PowerShell session with the console file.

The first command uses the Add-PSSnapin cmdlet to add the NewPSSnapin snap-in to the current session. You can only add Windows PowerShell snap-ins that are registered on your system.

The second command exports the Windows PowerShell snap-in names to the NewPSSnapinConsole.psc1 file.

The third command starts Windows PowerShell with the NewPSSnapinConsole.psc1 file. Because the console file includes the Windows PowerShell snap-in name, the cmdlets and providers in the snap-in are available in the current session.

Example 4: Export names of snap-ins to a specified location

PS C:\> export-console -path Console01
PS C:\> notepad console01.psc1
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<PSConsoleFile ConsoleSchemaVersion="1.0">
  <PSVersion>2.0</PSVersion>
  <PSSnapIns>
     <PSSnapIn Name="NewPSSnapin" />
  </PSSnapIns>
</PSConsoleFile>

This command exports the names of the Windows PowerShell snap-ins in the current session to the Console01.psc1 file in the current directory.

The second command displays the contents of the Console01.psc1 file in Notepad.

Example 5: Determine the console file to update

PS C:\> powershell.exe -PSConsoleFile Console01.psc1
PS C:\> Add-PSSnapin MySnapin
PS C:\> Export-Console NewConsole.psc1
PS C:\> $ConsoleFileName
PS C:\> Add-PSSnapin SnapIn03
PS C:\> Export-Console

This example shows how to use the $ConsoleFileName automatic variable to determine the console file that will be updated if you use Export-Console without a Path parameter value.

The first command uses the PSConsoleFile parameter of PowerShell.exe to open Windows PowerShell with the Console01.psc1 file.

The second command uses the Add-PSSnapin cmdlet to add the MySnapin Windows PowerShell snap-in to the current session.

The third command uses the Export-Console cmdlet to export the names of all the Windows PowerShell snap-ins in the session to the NewConsole.psc1 file.

The fourth command displays the $ConsoleFileName variable. It contains the most recently used console file. The sample output shows that NewConsole.ps1 is the most recently used file.

The fifth command adds SnapIn03 to the current console.

The sixth command uses the Export-Console cmdlet without a Path parameter. This command exports the names of all the Windows PowerShell snap-ins in the current session to the most recently used file, NewConsole.psc1.

Optional Parameters

-Confirm

Prompts you for confirmation before running the cmdlet.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:cf
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Force

Indicates that this cmdlet overwrites the data in a console file without warning, even if the file has the read-only attribute. The read-only attribute is changed and is not reset when the command finishes.

Type:SwitchParameter
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-NoClobber

Indicates that this cmdlet does not overwrite an existing console file. By default, if a file occurs in the specified path, Export-Console overwrites the file without warning.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:NoOverwrite
Position:Named
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False
-Path

Specifies a path and file name for the console file (*.psc1). Enter an optional path and name. Wildcard characters are not permitted.

If you specify only a file name, Export-Console creates a file that has that name and the .psc1 file name extension in the current directory.

This parameter is required unless you have opened Windows PowerShell with the PSConsoleFile parameter or exported a console file during the current session. It is also required when you use the NoClobber parameter to prevent the current console file from being overwritten.

If you omit this parameter, Export-Console overwrites the console file that was used most recently in this session. The path of the most recently used console file is stored in the value of the $ConsoleFileName automatic variable. For more information, see about_Automatic_Variables.

Type:String
Aliases:PSPath
Position:0
Default value:None
Accept pipeline input:True (ByPropertyName, ByValue)
Accept wildcard characters:False
-WhatIf

Shows what would happen if the cmdlet runs. The cmdlet is not run.

Type:SwitchParameter
Aliases:wi
Position:Named
Default value:False
Accept pipeline input:False
Accept wildcard characters:False

Inputs

System.String

You can pipe a path string to this cmdlet.

Outputs

System.IO.FileInfo

This cmdlet creates a file that contains the exported aliases.

Notes

  • When a console file (.psc1) is used to start the session, the name of the console file is automatically stored in the $ConsoleFileName automatic variable. The value of $ConsoleFileName is updated when you use the Path parameter of Export-Console to specify a new console file. When no console file is used, $ConsoleFileName has no value ($Null).

    To use a Windows PowerShell console file in a new session, use the following syntax to start Windows PowerShell:

    powershell.exe -PsConsoleFile \<ConsoleFile\>.psc1

    You can also save Windows PowerShell snap-ins for future sessions by adding an Add-PSSnapin command to your Windows PowerShell profile. For more information, see about_Profiles.

*